Tag Archives: temple of the dog

Chris Cornell Talks ‘Stupid’ Temple of the Dog Legal Battle

Chris Cornell discussed the legal battle over the Temple of the Dog master tapes in a new interview with Rolling Stone Australia.

“I don’t think so. It’s kind of a stupid thing. Unfortunately the band is not really part of this dispute. Temple of the Dog had a contract with A&M Records and there are specifics in that and it’s A&M Records that owns the masters, and doesn’t have them. And if anyone besides them would have the right to own them it would certainly be us first. But ultimately legally it’s not a fight that we can ever be in. It’s a strange thing.”

He also discussed balancing his solo career with working on a new Soundgarden record, “Yeah. If I’m not on tour or making an album for myself I’m always focusing on Soundgarden. It’s kind of what I do. And in the last five years it’s been pretty amazing to be able to do this acoustic solo career simultaneously with Soundgarden, which is like this sonic assault. And to be able to bounce back between the two always feels refreshing.”

Watch Previously Unreleased Temple of the Dog Video

Chris Cornell was recently interviewed by Live Nation TV, and the interview showcased unreleased Temple of the Dog footage. Watch below for the video!

Chris Cornell discussed Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” in a new AV Club article.

“I don’t really remember it. [Laughs.] I kind of remember the basics but singing on that album happened so quickly. The song itself, it really wasn’t much of a song. It was a verse with just a kind of repeating chorus. It was just where we needed one more song for the album, and I had that down, but I hadn’t played it for anybody yet because I didn’t feel it was a complete song. But I knew we had nine songs, and I thought 10 would be a nice, even round number. I just figured that this would be the 10th song that would wrap up the album, and it would just be what it was, verse for verse and then repeating chorus sort of like a coda for the album listening experience. In rehearsing it, and I think we only rehearsed for two days for that album, but I was singing both parts of the song. I sang the high verse part and then the low chorus part and then the high chorus part and so on.

Eddie and the rest of them were waiting for us to finish because they were about to have one of their first rehearsals as Pearl Jam, and he saw me sort of struggling with it, so he just walked up to the mic and started singing the low part, and I started singing the high part. I immediately got this idea that his voice sounded so rich in that low register that it would become more of a song if I sang the first verse, then the whole band kicks in, and then he sings that verse again, but in effect it becomes a different verse. It’s a different person. It’s a different voice and a different everything. And I think I had that idea right there on the spot; we did it that way, and suddenly it was a real song. I hate to use that term “real song” but to me it was like: Okay, in just a moment this has become an arrangement that changes everything.

I never thought about it as being singular or anything because there were a lot of really well written songs that lent themselves to the notion of a single, but once we played it for other people, that was the choice that was made. But my memory of us singing it together is I just went in and sang my part, he went in and sang his part, and it took probably 40 minutes, and that was it. That was back in the day where you had no record budget, and that album in particular was recorded and mixed in a total of 14 days, not in a row.”

Chris Cornell Talks Audioslave Coming From Temple of the Dog’s Spirit

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell discussed Temple of the Dog and Audioslave during a recent interview with WDHA 105.5 New Jersey, as transcribed by Alternative Nation.

“For me it started to me with Temple of the Dog. I knew that the four members of Soundgarden together in the context of what we were doing was a special thing, and that’s about all I knew. I didn’t know that myself as an addition to any other combination was going to mean much, and that album kind of changed that thought process where I realized that as long as you throw yourself into something, and it’s with the right people, you can do it in lots of different contexts, and that’s where Audioslave was born, in that spirit. I didn’t want to say no to having a creative relationship with those three guys, because I thought they were brilliant. We wrote three albums in a really short period of time, and they felt vital to me. That’s kind of informed what I’ve done.

The other thing has been that I came from kind of a post punk indie musical background, where there were no rules. Basically, you could kind of do anything you wanted, and that was the point of it. I think Soundgarden was very eclectic from the start, we were not ever cornered stylistically. That did something for me personally, in that I never felt I was cornered as an artist or a songwriter to do whatever I want, and I still feel like that.”

Watch Chris Cornell & Mike McCready Play Temple of the Dog & Mad Season

Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready joined Chris Cornell onstage last night at Benayora Hall in Seattle to perform Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” and Mad Season’s “River of Deceit.” Watch videos below.


Setlist:

Before We Disappear
Can’t Change Me
Moonchild
The Times They Are A-Changin’ (Bob Dylan cover) (Rewritten version called “The Times Are A-Changin’ Back”)
As Hope & Promise Fade
Nearly Forgot My Broken Heart
Fell on Black Days (Soundgarden song)
Thank You (Led Zeppelin cover)
River of Deceit (Mad Season cover)
Hunger Strike (Temple of the Dog song)
Wide Awake (Audioslave song)
Doesn’t Remind Me (Audioslave song)
Be Yourself (Audioslave song)
Blow Up the Outside World (Soundgarden song)
Let Your Eyes Wander
All Night Thing (Temple of the Dog song)
Call Me a Dog (Temple of the Dog song)
When I’m Down
Worried Moon
Rusty Cage (Soundgarden song)
Sunshower
Black Hole Sun (Soundgarden song)
Like a Stone (Audioslave song)
Nothing Compares 2 U (Prince cover)
Ave Maria (Franz Schubert cover)
Cleaning My Gun
Wooden Jesus (Temple of the Dog song)

Encore:
I Threw It All Away (Bob Dylan cover)
Josephine
Higher Truth

Mike McCready discussed Mad Season and Chris Cornell in an interview with Alternative Nation earlier this month:

I’m very proud of the whole Mad Season Benayora Hall album that just came out. We got on the classical charts, we’re number 5 on the classical charts, which is bizarre to me, and amazing. That was an incredible journey that I started 2 and a half years ago talking to Ludovic Morlot, who is the head of our Seattle Symphony. When he said yes I would like to do this, and do these Mad Season songs, that’s when I gave him the CD, and he came back about a year later. Then Chris got involved, and it turned into something bigger and more magical than I could have ever imagined. Jeff and Stone came, we did some Temple [of the Dog] stuff, I know I’m going back in time right now, but I’m very proud of that moment and that release, that we recorded it. Maybe we’ll do something else, we filmed some stuff from that show, so maybe we’ll do something with that someday.

I’d like to do something else with the Symphony someday, but I kind of need to figure out what that is, and if they’d even like to do that again. I’d love to do any kind of cool independent movies that touch me, that come my way. I’m sure we’ll end up doing some Pearl Jam stuff next year. Like I said opportunities arise if you are aware of them, if you keep your ear to the ground. I don’t know, I’d love to do something with Cornell again, he’s very busy, but that would be an amazing thing too, and I look forward to doing more stuff with my guys too.

Top 10 Greatest 10 Minute Songs Of The 90’s

While the 60’s and 70’s are known for epic 10 minute plus songs from iconic bands like Pink Floyd and The Doors, the 90’s also featured some epic songs from seminal alternative rock bands like Tool, Smashing Pumpkins, Temple of the Dog, and Jane’s Addiction. Below are the Top 10 Greatest 10 Minute Songs Of The 90’s.

10. Neurosis – “Through Silver In Blood”

“Through Silver in Blood” kicks off Neurosis’ 1996 album Through Silver In Blood. The song opens up with a tribal feel rhymically, gradually building u[ until the vocals and guitar fully kick in. The song is a fan favorite live, and closes many shows.

9. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds – “O’Malley’s Bar”

While “O’Malley’s Bar,” off of 1995’s Murder Ballads, is an epic song in length, Nick Cave told Rolling Stone Australia in 1995 that the key to the track is its simplicity. “In a lot of cases the song is really simple. A guy walks into O’Malley’s Bar and shoots everybody. He knows everybody, it’s his local bar. Little things he observes, the way he is in awe of what he does, what a bullet can do a person, all that kind of stuff. That’s very much what storytelling is about, for me. Those nasty little details.”

8. Jeff Buckley – “Kanga-Roo” (Alex Chilton)

Jeff Buckley’s Big Star cover appeared on 1994’s Grace, and while Buckley’s cover doesn’t change too much from the original, but the tracks builds and sounded significantly different live.

7. NOFX – “The Decline”

NOFX’s “The Decline” is unique because it appeared on a single track EP in 1999. The track clocks in at 18 minutes and is a biting satire of American politics including issues like guns, drugs, the religious right, and the destruction of consitutional rights.

6. Tool – “Disgustipated”

Despite “Disgustipated” having a long length, the song is a great example of Maynard James Keenan’s dark sense of humor, but much more subtle than his work with Puscifer. There are many different fan interpretations of the lyrics, with some thinking certain parts are about alien abductions, mocking vegetarians, a commentary on animal rights, and comparing people to carrots. The track appears on 1993’s Undertow.

5. Guns N’ Roses – “Coma”

“Coma,” off of 1991’s Use Your Illusion 1, opens up with a pulsating heartbeat, and leading into Axl Rose’s story of never wanting to come out of a coma. Musically, the song is Slash’s baby, and while the song is mostly a dark rocker, there’s a feeling of peace during Slash’s solo before Axl Rose’s triumphant vocal finale.

4. Tool – “Third Eye”

“Third Eye,” off of 1996’s Ænima, is another epic Tool tracks with thought provoking lyrics with many different fan interpretations, ranging from peyote ‘prying open my third eye’ to being about the pineal gland in the brain controlling your body. The song certainly feels like a drug trip!

3. Temple of the Dog – “Reach Down”

“Reach Down” is a plodding gospel rocker featuring some of Chris Cornell’s lyrics. On the track Cornell sings about his late friend Andrew Wood, and tries to deal with how to remember him after his tragic death. Cornell frantically contemplates Wood’s essence and how he would want to be remembered. He sings, “And I’m sparking like a heart attack, now I’ve got room to spread my wings and my messages of love, yes love was my drug, but that’s not what I died of, so don’t think of me crying louder than some billion dollar baby.”

2. Smashing Pumpkins – “Starla”

“Starla” features one of Billy Corgan’s most memorable guitar riffs, and it is a quintessential early 90’s Pumpkins song. The track opens with a melodic riff and later cranks up the distortion, before breaking down again before the epic guitar solo. The track is a fan favorite, with a Smashing Pumpkins fansite even named after it (Starla.org), but it never appeared on an official studio album, instead being featured on 1994’s compilation of outtakes and B-sides Pisces Iscariot.

1. Jane’s Addiction – “Three Days”

“Three Days,” off of 1990’s Ritual de lo Habitual, is not only one of the greatest 10 minute songs of the 90’s, but it is one of the great 10 minute songs of all time. “Three Days” has the structure of a three act play or film, the song doesn’t let up structurally and moves from part to part without ever feeling stale or having any filler. Dave Navarro’s solo is one of his best, and Perry Farrell manages to make a song about a three day drug fueled threesome feel like a spiritual journey.

Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” Was Completed Before Pearl Jam’s First Rehearsal

Chris Cornell discussed Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” in a new AV Club article.

“I don’t really remember it. [Laughs.] I kind of remember the basics but singing on that album happened so quickly. The song itself, it really wasn’t much of a song. It was a verse with just a kind of repeating chorus. It was just where we needed one more song for the album, and I had that down, but I hadn’t played it for anybody yet because I didn’t feel it was a complete song. But I knew we had nine songs, and I thought 10 would be a nice, even round number. I just figured that this would be the 10th song that would wrap up the album, and it would just be what it was, verse for verse and then repeating chorus sort of like a coda for the album listening experience. In rehearsing it, and I think we only rehearsed for two days for that album, but I was singing both parts of the song. I sang the high verse part and then the low chorus part and then the high chorus part and so on.

Eddie and the rest of them were waiting for us to finish because they were about to have one of their first rehearsals as Pearl Jam, and he saw me sort of struggling with it, so he just walked up to the mic and started singing the low part, and I started singing the high part. I immediately got this idea that his voice sounded so rich in that low register that it would become more of a song if I sang the first verse, then the whole band kicks in, and then he sings that verse again, but in effect it becomes a different verse. It’s a different person. It’s a different voice and a different everything. And I think I had that idea right there on the spot; we did it that way, and suddenly it was a real song. I hate to use that term “real song” but to me it was like: Okay, in just a moment this has become an arrangement that changes everything.

I never thought about it as being singular or anything because there were a lot of really well written songs that lent themselves to the notion of a single, but once we played it for other people, that was the choice that was made. But my memory of us singing it together is I just went in and sang my part, he went in and sang his part, and it took probably 40 minutes, and that was it. That was back in the day where you had no record budget, and that album in particular was recorded and mixed in a total of 14 days, not in a row.”

Chris Cornell Discusses Mad Season’s Future

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell discussed Mad Season’s possible future following their January 2015 Sonic Evolution performance in a Pearl Jam Radio special with Mike McCready on SiriusXM, as transcribed by Alternative Nation.

“Saying yes was easy, because it’s an honor, but I was a little afraid being in the middle of recording. I have that certain type of ADD that sort of forces you to only focus on one thing, and it was kind of like, oh to do this, I don’t really want to do that. Then I was kind of tossing it up, and it was actually my wife Vicky who said: ‘Well you have to do it.’ Wives have sort of that role, they tell you everything is going to be okay, and tell you to shut up. Then I thought, God you’re right, it’s not going to come up again.”

He added, “Unless, and this is always something to think about, this could be an annual thing. Could do it again and again.”

McCready responded, “Hey, any time you want to do anything like this, especially the Temple [of the Dog] stuff, which sounded great.”

madseason15live

Mike McCready discussed Chris Cornell standing in for the late, great Layne Staley at the Sonic Evolution Mad Season concert from January at Benaroya Hall in Seattle in a new Pearl Jam Radio special on SiriusXM. You can read a quote transcribed by Alternative Nation below.

“We chose to record three Mad Season songs with the symphony. I wanted it to be a representation of each guy that wrote in the band as much as possible. Selfishly, I wanted to do ‘River of Deceit,’ because I wrote the music for that, but also Layne wrote the lyrics for that, as he did with everything else. ‘Long Gone Day,’ which is basically written by Barrett [Martin], and again Layne and Mark Lanegan wrote the lyrics to that. Then Josh Evans had the idea to do ‘I Don’t Know Anything,’ which was kind of out of left field, and I didn’t know how that was gonna work, but it ended up turning out really cool. That was Layne’s song that he wrote on that record, along with others.

So it was kind of a good representation of the whole record, I think for three songs they became way huger than I ever imagined they could be, in a different way with Chris Cornell singing on top of them. When I heard he wanted to do that, I literally jumped for joy, I couldn’t believe it. He brought his take to it, and did it beautifully, and I think Layne would have been proud.”