Tag Archives: Stone Temple Pilots

Widow Says Scott Weiland Was Drinking Heavily, STP Drummer Never Gave Up Hope

Jamie Weiland, Scott’s third wife and widow, tells Rolling Stone that her husband was drinking heavily “before he left on this tour. He did tell me, ‘I’m going to get it together.'” She joined him on the road for a week in November and says Scott was “just killing it” onstage, “every night taking it up a notch.”

Wildabouts guitarist Jeremy Brown’s death “completely destroyed” Weiland, Jamie confirms. He rebuilt the Wildabouts and went on tour. But “even up to a couple of weeks ago, when I saw him, he’d talk about Jeremy every day. He always had tears in his eyes.”

Stone Temple Pilots drummer Eric Kretz said he never gave up hope on Weiland, despite their issues.

“He was so tenacious in his lust for life in the early years, I really hoped he would come back – and have a second chance.”

He did say though that STP had to fire him in 2013.

“It wasn’t spontaneous by any means,” Kretz insists, defending that action. “He was making choices, and they were all going bad.”

Chris Cornell Talks ‘Glamorizing’ Of Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain & Layne Staley’s Deaths

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was recently interviewed by 105.7 the Point, and Alternative Nation has transcribed several quotes. The reporter asked Cornell if it blows his mind that he’s still here, especially with fellow Grunge icons Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain, and Layne Staley having died.

“I don’t know, it’s hard to say. I guess the overall attitude ends up being that it’s a drug issue, but that’s kind of cloudy. I have other friends that are extremely talented musicians that died in different ways.”

He said he doesn’t blame the music industry for rock star deaths.

“What I’m getting at is if you go into a 12-step meeting in any city, and you count 75 people and you ask how many people are musicians, you’re going to get 2, and everybody else is going to be from every walk of life as you can imagine. The same as Scott Weiland’s mother crying, there are mothers crying who have lost their sons who are construction workers, mechanics, literally anything you can think of, and it’s happening every day. The only difference between a musician that’s famous, and that other kid, is we don’t talk about them on the radio, that’s kind of it. They’re not somebody that is a public personality that’s already been talked about for other reasons.”

“Then I also think there’s kind of a history of glamorizing a little bit the ‘dead guy,’ whether it’s a rock star or a famous actor. James Dean, he only made three movies, and he’s one of the best known actors of all time. Granted, I think everyone agreed that he was really talented, and he died in a sort of glamorous bad ass way, which was in a little race car on his way to a race, driving it himself. I think there’s something to the legend of that, and the story of that, but one of the things I’ve experienced over and over again, which I think is a way that people deal with it, particularly when it’s somebody that is already kind of celebrated for something, is that we kind of invent the idea that it was ‘predetermined’ I think. That’s where I get impatient with it, because if that’s the case, then it’s predetermined with every kid that ends up with a substance abuse habit, and dies from it.”

Cornell also discussed personal responsibility when it comes to an addict dying, not blaming hanging out with ‘the wrong crowd’ for death. Cornell said he sees it as a parental way of dealing with it, and that he doesn’t agree with blaming other people for the addict’s death. “I’m not saying that is entirely wrong, but if someone has the propensity to abuse alcohol or drugs, and if they didn’t meet the wrong sort this weekend, they’re going to meet another guy somewhere else, if you have that in you.”

He later said, “I don’t think that, at the end of the day, if a person really wants to get better, anything can stop them, and if a person doesn’t want to, they won’t. You can’t make them do it.”

Fuel Cover Stone Temple Pilots “Vasoline” In Honor Of Scott Weiland

Fuel recently opened their east coast December shows with a cover of Stone Temple Pilots’ “Vasoline.”

“This one’s for a fallen comrade,” says frontman Brett Scallions, before launching into the classic slide-driven riff. The song closes with a “Love ya brother,” from Scallions as well.

In addition to sharing the stage numerous times, Scallions and Scott Weiland were also co-owners in a New York City Rock Club called Snitch, for a few years.

Alternative Nation would like to wish a very happy (belated) birthday to Brett Scallions!

Watch Fuel open with “Vaoline” at their 12/19 show at the Chameleon Club in Lancaster, PA:

Stone Temple Pilots Release Scott Weiland Tribute ‘Memories Of Candles & Incense’

Stone Temple Pilots’ surviving members Robert DeLeo, Dean DeLeo, and Eric Kretz have released an emotional tribute to their late frontman Scott Weiland. In the video, the band listen back to “Atlanta” off of 1999’s No. 4.

Robert: Dean, Eric, and I wanted to honor Scott, and we thought the best way to do that would be musically. We chose this song because we felt it was one of the times in his career where Scott was truly at his best.

Dean:
When you hear this track, we hope to share in the same feeling, and spirit, that each of us had while recording it. The four of us in a room, capturing a moment in time on tape. So enjoy the song, and the depth of this brilliant performance from Scott.

Eric:
Once again, another amazing vocal performance from Scott. This is one song in particular that hits me the same way today as it did the day that we recorded it. I mean, love how he crafted such great lyrics, melody, and that true and honest tone in his voice. It was truly something special.

Robert: You know, pulling up the multitracks of this song 16 years after it was recorded was very emotional, especially with Scott’s passing. It brought back a lot of great memories of the person who added so much to these songs. This music lives on, and we’ll always remember Scott this way.

STP have also released two alternate versions of “Atlanta” on their official website.

Watch Stone Temple Pilots Perform In Underwear At First Ever 1989 Concert

The first ever video of an early incarnation of Stone Temple Pilots performing live in the 1980’s has surfaced online. Scott Weiland, Robert DeLeo, and guitarist Corey Hickok had performed together in the band Swing with other members, including the Tubbs brothers, dating back to sometime in 1987, with Eric Kretz later joining and the band eventually shifting into a 4 piece.

The band changed their name to Mighty Joe Young in 1989. According to the uploader, this is the first ever live video of Weiland, Robert DeLeo, Hickok, and Kretz performing together in 1989 in Huntington Beach, CA. The song performed is called “Pink Panther Smoke It.” Dean DeLeo joined the band later in 1989, replacing Hichok and completely transforming the band’s sound. Gary Dalton uploaded the video to YouTube with the following description:

“As far as I have knowledge…this is the first time ever that Scott Weiland, Robert DeLeo and Eric Kretz ever took the stage together. This is 1989…I had been working with them mostly Robert as a mentor in recording techniques…they had rehearsed as a band but never played on a stage. This was in Huntington Beach CA. I was running the sound (a couple quik glimpes of striped shirt). I am finally posting this clip as a tribute to Scott…we all have a beginning and we all have an end.”

As far as I have knowledge…this is the first time ever that Scott Weiland, Robert DeLeo and Eric Kretz ever took the stage together. This is 1989…I had been working with them mostly Robert as a mentor in recording techniques…they had rehearsed as a band but never played on a stage. This was in Huntington Beach CA. I was running the sound (a couple quik glimpes of striped shirt). I am finally posting this clip as a tribute to Scott…we all have a beginning and we all have an end. So sorry to hear today’s news. You will be missed little brother…RIP”

Eric Kretz remembered STP’s formative 80’s years in a 2013 Alternative Nation interview.

“God, I think it was ’86 or ’87. I was playing in various bands down in Long Beach, I moved there from San Jose, California. So it began in Long Beach and realizing how hard it is to find a band that is inspiring the music you want to do. I just happened to put an ad in the Recycler magazine down there: ‘Drummer available.’

Robert called me, and man we talked on the phone for 2 to 3 hours about everything from Steely Dan, to Led Zeppelin, to Mahavishnu Orchestra, to Neal Peart, to Bill Bruford. The similarities were so incredible, and the fact that he grew up in New Jersey and I grew up on the west coast in San Jose, but we grew up on the same types of music at the same time. He was saying in junior high school is when he got into Rush’s Hemisphere, and Permanent Waves. Playing parties and kind of riffing out those songs.

So then we set up an audition, I think I met Scott once before the audition. Then the Sound-o-hull I think it was called, me and Robert went into this great little funky bass and drum groove. The guitar player Corey [Hickok] was touching the mics saying, “Oh, I’m getting shocked, I’m getting shocked.” The next thing you know he’s flying into my drum kit, his face is turning blue, his shoes are burning. It was horrible, he was fully getting electrocuted.

We managed to pull the power cord, he definitely was in bad shape. Luckily I knew where the hospital was around the corner, so I was like everyone follow me and we drove to the hospital. [Then] I’m kind of sitting there in the emergency room and Scott looks and me and [is] like, “Fuck that’s so weird, I guess you’re in the band.”

Scott Weiland: A 25-Year Musical Retrospective

Edited by Brett Buchanan

The passing of Scott Weiland has sent ripples throughout the rock music industry. Many artists have paid tribute of his passing with their own covers of their favorite tracks featuring Weiland, with Chris Cornell also dedicating the Temple Of The Dog classic “Say Hello 2 Heaven” to Weiland.

With Scott Weiland’s last in-depth interview being with Alternative Nation owner Brett Buchanan, and with the simple fact that his music has had a profound impact on the reporters here at Alternative Nation, we decided to do a look back on the influence Weiland’s music had over his 25-year career on each reporter, all the way back from the 1989/1990 Mighty Joe Young demos to 2015’s Blaster.

Brett Buchanan:

Purple is overall my favorite STP album. It’s just one of those timeless albums you can play front to back on repeat. When it comes to my favorite songs from Scott, there are so many from throughout his career. The 1990 “Only Dying” demo from STP’s Mighty Joe Young days is a really underrated gem, and the lyrics feel even more tragic now with what has happened 25 years later.

I have a real affinity for the final songs on STP albums. “Maver” off of their last record was a beautiful track, it showed the evolution of his songwriting over the years. “Atlanta” and “Kitchenware and Candybars” are epic. From his solo career, the standouts to me are “Barbarella,” “The Man I Didn’t Know,” and “Amethyst.” From Velvet Revolver, you can’t go wrong with the hits “Fall to Pieces” and “Slither.”

Scott changed his style not just from album to album, but from song to song. He could have easily rested on his laurels and written Core lite music after 1992, but all the way up until Blaster he kept pushing himself artistically. Regardless of what else he was going through in his life, Scott Weiland always had a great melody in him. Like Fred Durst said, he was the melody man. Rest in peace Scott.

Greg Prato:

I would say a 2-way tie between Purple and Tiny Music From The Vatican Gift Shop STP reminded me of the great ’70s rock bands (Aerosmith, Kiss, Queen, etc.), as they seemed to get better and better with each album, and each album spawned several classics. Top fav song is “Interstate Love Song,” which is one of the best ’90s rockers – which is no small feat considering how many classics came out between ’91-’94. I also fancy “Pretty Penny,” “Vasoline,” “Big Bang Baby” (my fav STP video!!), “Sour Girl,” and “Days of the Week.” Thank you Mr. Weiland for all the great music.

Jeff Gorra:

Songs: “Interstate Love Song” is so melodic and catchy, it’s the first song I ever played live with a band. “Wonderful” is also an underrated beautiful ballad and “Tripping On A Hole In A Paper Heart” is just such a cool & unique song, along with “Last Fight” from Velvet Revolver.

Album: Purple, it’s ridiculous how many good songs are on that record. I can listen to that all the way thru, front to back, back to front.

Mike Mazzarone:

You know, I could go with what everyone else has been saying, how Core, Purple…etc have been the most impactful albums that I’ve ever heard from Scott, how they have the greatest songs in the history of his career…etc. And while there is some truth to that, let me tell a little quickie about how I coped after Scott’s death.

I was privileged enough to see his last ever show in the United States. As everyone is aware, that show was in promotion of Blaster, Scott’s now final album. I know people have said they don’t want to listen to Scott’s music, or they reach for the old standbys like Tiny Music or Core, but for me? I have listened to Blaster twice a day, every day. I mention this the “album of the year” write up, if Blaster makes the top ten but for me, the album serves a pivotal footnote in the musical history of Scott Weiland. It showed that he really still had it, but you could also hear the pain. The pain in his voice for a lot of these tracks, mostly polished up by studio magic – listen to the Rolling Stone live version of “Way She Moves”, you’ll see what I mean. It is a pure tragedy, Scott Weiland’s death had to happen the way he did. Our addictions, our vices are one of the hardest things to over come. That much is true, when I ran into him with fellow AN reporter, Doug McCausland, you could see that Scott was really out of it. Yet, he managed to give the best show that I’ve seen from him since 2010.

In a way, Blaster now has a more special meaning than the albums I grew up with. I think we will always look at it as more underrated than it really is.

Core made me a fan. I’m a fan of a lot of the more underrated STP works like Atlanta, Dare If You Dare, Art School Girl, Kitchenware and Candybars, Where The River Goes, Pretty Penny, Bi-Polar Bear, Maver, Naked Sunday, Where The River Goes…etc. But I can say with confidence that Scott Weiland/Stone Temple Pilots are one of a handful of acts that I can listen to over and over again without skipping a single song. Without my rediscovery of STP in 2009 and the self titled album that came out shortly after, I would probably be still on my country music kick and writing for some Garth Brooks fansite.

What a shame that would be.

Scott without a doubt made me the rock fan I am today, he will remain as one of my favorite acts of all time but it just pains me that the lasting memory I have of him, was his final states show where there was a guy shouting next to us “WAY TO GO SCOTTY! WE LOVE YOU SCOTTY” and he didn’t even give it a single thought.

We do love you though Scotty. We always will. Rest in peace.

Doug McCausland:

I was born in July of 1993, precisely at the time “Plush” was making its waves topping the Billboard rock charts. I didn’t give a shit about the rock music trends of the Generation X era; I was too busy trying to collect all 120 stars in Super Mario 64.

My only knowledge of Stone Temple Pilots was a conversation I overheard my father having with my mother, spinning a copy of The Doors’ Waiting for the Sun, something or another about Stone Temple Pilots performing with The Doors and somehow taking up Jim Morrison’s mantle. It wasn’t until years later I realized he was referring to Scott’s performance with the surviving members of The Doors on VH1 Storytellers, delivering an awesome cover of “Five to One”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leSX-U821I4

In fact, it wasn’t until 2006 that I had really delved into rock music; Chris Cornell’s powerful vocals in the Casino Royale theme piqued my interest in soulful rock music, Guns N’ Roses’ Greatest Hits (specifically, “Live And Let Die”) exposed me to the dark yet majestic stride of hard rock. My interest in the latter would lead to an introduction to Velvet Revolver’s and its’ engimatic frontman, Scott Richard Weiland, around the release of Libertad.

“Who is this guy?” My boggled middle school mind asked itself, comparing the Weiland slithering around on stage dressed like a leather fetish Nazi to images images liner notes of Libertad (dressed like Clint Eastwood or Roland Deschain) and images on Google search. “He’s like a million different people.” My intrigue with the chameleon Weiland led me to bum my dad’s copy of STP’s Thank You, and, as it has it, while others my age obsessed over Soulja Boy and Good Charlotte, Tiny Music… Songs from the Vatican Gift Shop was on constant repeat.

Tim Branom:

Other than Chris Cornell and Eddie Vedder, Scott Weiland was the last great voice in recent memory from the Grunge era to continue making music. At first, critics called him an Eddie Vedder clone, and then later, his Jim Morrison persona took over and never left. But It sometimes had a dash of Johhny Rotten and sometimes a bit of 60’s Psychedelia looking over your shoulder. He finally won over critics with his unusual lyrics and videos, creating his own sound from California, very different than his adoptive Seattle Grunge brothers, but yet the comparison remained.

And when Weiland joined Velvet Revolver, it was a true super group which our generation had not seen since the debut of a new singer with Van Halen. When we lost Weiland on Dec 3, 2015, we lost musical creativity in an age where bands of today must not only record old songs to get attention; they sometimes have to actually sample the song as well just to get a hit. Maybe his legacy will be studied so that future rock stars can learn from a master. Below are my top picks for a fine Scott Weiland listening experience. Enjoy.

(1992) Stone Temple Pilots: Core
Recommended: “Creep”, “Plush” , “Sex Type Thing”, “Wicked Garden”
(1994) Stone Temple Pilots: Purple
Recommended: “Big Empty”, “Interstate Love Song”, “Vasoline”
(1995) Various Artists: Encomium: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin
Recommended: “Dancing Days” – Stone Temple Pilots
(1996) Stone Temple Pilots: Tiny Music…Songs From The Vatican Gift Shop
Recommended: “Big Bang Baby”, “Lady Picture Show”, “Trippin’ on a Hole in a Paper Heart”
(1998) Scott Weiland: 12 Bar Blues
Recommended: “Lady, Your Roof Brings Me Down”
(1999) Stone Temple Pilots: No. 4
Recommended: “Sour Girl”
(2000) Various Artists: Stoned Immaculate: The Music of the Doors
Recommended: “Break On Through” – Stone Temple Pilots
(2004) Velvet Revolver: Contraband
Recommended: “Fall to Pieces”, “Slither”

Elias Fulmer:

I’ve been an active reader of AlternativeNation.net for about 4 years now and a writer/reporter here for nearly half that time. I’ve noticed the site’s strong connection to Weiland – and even if we published articles about him not showing him at his best, I know many of the writers here were rooting for him. They deeply cared and were worried about him. I haven’t explored Scott Weiland’s discography as heavily as others, but there are several key highlights for me.

Earlier in life, let’s say I was just going through a hard time and ended up in a 72 hour psychiatric hold. In the ambulance, one of the EMTs offered to put on Pandora Radio and I said sure, “alternative rock, please.” The three songs that played to my memory were “Disarm” by the Smashing Pumpkins, “Come As You Are” by Nirvana and “Creep” by Stone Temple Pilots. I’ve always loved “Creep” (more than Radiohead song of the same title) and have found myself listening to the Unplugged version many a lonely nights.

The first two Stone Temple Pilots albums made a bigger impression on me. One summer, my friends and I carried around a large dufflebag full of sixty-some cassettes and one of the most frequently played cassettes was Stone Temple Pilots’ 1994 Purple. I hazily recall a conversation between my friend Cade and I fondly discussing the record shortly after I became a writer here at AlternativeNation. I never dug into the Velvet Revolver stuff too much, but recently I found their cover of Nirvana’s “Negative Creep” and discovered I may enjoy it more than the original.

But I think what speaks to me most about Weiland was his cover of the Smiths’ “Reel Around the Fountain.” It is one of my most cherished works by the Smiths and deals with very sensitive, delicate and introspective matters concerning sexuality. I think it would take anyone a bit guts to speak about those sorts of things.I understand Scott dealt with a great deal of suffering in the realms of love, sex and addictions of that kind, separate but not unrelated to vices like alcohol or other intoxicants. It’s sad to see Scott go – I really was enjoying Blaster and I was planning on going to his LA show later this month. I almost met him when Brett interviewed him – but I had just bought tickets to Texas by the time Brett invited me. Some things aren’t meant to be…Wherever he lies, I hope he has found peace and serenity at last.

I’ve always admired your sense of artistry and integrity. Thanks for the memories and rest easy, Scott.

“I’m half the man I used to be. This I feel as the dawn, it fades to gray.”

Anthony Carioscia:

I guess I’d go with Purple being my favorite album Scott Weiland did. It evolved from the Grunge sound of the debut and added more variety to the song writing which in turn showed us even more of Scott’s vocal range.

Cindy Slade:

I’d say the two albums that I play the most (still), are Core & Purple. It’s quite hard to pick a favorite song, but the one that always comes to the forefront of my mind is “Vasoline”.

The song is fun, and I’ve always loved the video they put out for it, especially the insect in the vasoline in the very opening of it. I never get tired of listening to it. I’ve always loved “Slither” from Velvet Revolver as well.

Hanna Graf:

I have loved Stone Temple Pilots Core ever since I first heard it. There isn’t one bad song on that album. I love the heavy and powerful music, but most of all its Scott Weiland’s voice. His deep, booming, forceful voice fills up the room even without his megaphone. It’s unique and matched by very few other singers. For me, STP is all about Scott Weiland and they are just not interesting without him.

Another album I often listen to is Velvet Revolver’s Libertad. I don’t feel as strongly about it as Core, but it’s a really good rock album. And you just can’t go wrong with Scott Weiland’s voice and Slash’s guitar.

It’s very sad that the world has lost such a unique voice way too soon, but Scott Weiland will always remain one of my favorite singers.

Jeremy Neugebauer:

It’s always crazy to me that people rediscover great music after an artist passes on and all the while their music was just there waiting for someone to give it a listen again and it takes their life ending for people to listen to it, which I am now guilty of. The past couple days I’ve been rediscovering Purple.

After a Scott Weiland tribute on AN Radio and listening to much of it, I have come to the conclusion that Purple is quite possibly a top 5 album of the 90’s. I now recall that in my teen years I once said ‘Interstate Love Song” was my favorite song and along with “Big Empty”, “Vasoline”, “Unglued”, and “Pretty Penny” it made some of the best singles from a single rock album during the period, but its the deeper cuts that set this album apart, which is the same with most great albums. “Meatplow”, “Lounge Fly”, “Still Remains”, “Silvergun Superman”, “Army Ants” are all just as strong as the singles. I just rediscovered this wonderful album again and it is the definition of a classic. Scott Weiland, like with many of the other rock greats, was a troubled genius, passing on way too young.

Hear all the best from Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver and Scott Weiland at www.rockshowradio.net and www.alternativenation.net/radio

Stone Temple Pilots’ Sales Soar Following Scott Weiland’s Death

Sell more records if I’m dead.
Purple flowers once again.
Hope it’s sooner, hope it’s near,
corporate records’ fiscal year.

Billboard is reporting that 8 of the top 10 titles on the Hard Rock Digital Songs chart (dated Dec. 26) are by either Stone Temple Pilots (six) or Velvet Revolver (two), the two non-solo acts that Weiland fronted. The top-performing song, Stone Temple Pilots’ “Plush,” returns to top the chart, up by 1,405 percent to 18,000 downloads sold, according to Nielsen Music. (It sold 1,000 the week before.) STP’s “Interstate Love Song” also re-enters at No. 2 (14,000, up 1,447 percent), followed by the band’s “Creep” at No. 3 (9,000, up 1,192 percent). “Fall to Pieces,” the top-selling track from Velvet Revolver, ranks at No. 4 (8,000, up 2,512 percent).

STP’s “Vasoline,” “Big Empty” and “Sex Type Thing” arrive at Nos. 6-8, respectively, with Velvet Revolver’s “Slither” new at No. 9.

Stone Temple Pilots’ 2003 greatest hits set Thank You re-enters the Billboard 200 at No. 47, up by 1,787 percent to 17,000 equivalent album units. Core clocks in at No. 145 (7,000, up 530 percent), marking its first appearance on the chart in slightly more than 20 years.

Streaming for Weiland tracks also surged, with “Plush” drawing 1.3 million U.S. clicks in the tracking week — a 313 percent rise.

Three Stone Temple Pilots songs additionally are on Hot Rock Songs (which launched in 2009): “Plush” (No. 7), “Interstate” (No. 9) and “Creep” (No. 12). (They’re the band’s best placements since “Between the Lines” spent seven weeks No. 1 beginning in April 2010.)

Scott Weiland Was Friends With Pearl Jam Members

Photoshop by Alternative Nation contributor Dustin Halter

Our article on Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament’s reaction to Scott Weiland’s death last Friday led to a lot of comments wondering if Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots ever had any relationship or interactions.

STP and Pearl Jam’s history goes back over 20 years ago to 1993, when Eddie Vedder infamously told Rolling Stone magazine in 1993 that Weiland was ‘coppin’ his trip’ after Jeff Ament told him about the “Plush” video. The myth of STP ripping off Pearl Jam was later disproved when demos from 1989-1991 surfaced from the band’s Mighty Joe Young days, which included songs that would later become fan favorites like “Wicked Garden.” These songs were first demoed before Pearl Jam existed. Scott Weiland told Alternative Nation last month even that the dark “Only Dying” was demoed in 1990.

Weiland told Metal Hammer in 2001 that he and STP were friends with members of Pearl Jam, even after their initial criticism of the band. “That was tough to take, and also kinda odd because Pearl Jam went through the same thing when they first came out,” sighed Scott. “But we’re friends with all the guys from Pearl Jam, except Eddie. He’s kind of a loner, although Stone [Gossard, guitarist] and Mike [McCreadie, lead guitarist] always come to see us when we play Seattle.”

Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament reacted to the death of Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland during a Twitter chat on Friday with fans.

Interview: Brandon Boyd Talks New Incubus Album, Scott Weiland & Helping Dave Grohl

Photo: Ben Cope

“Human beings are inherently creative; we just all express ourselves differently. Some of us go towards the arts, some us go into finance, some us go into the service industry, some of us drive cars and some are Instagram artists. But we are a creative species. I see all of it,” Brandon Boyd tells me from a Miami café during last week’s Art Basel.

The most amazing thing about the arts is that there really is no definition. It is what you make it, whatever you want it to be. It can be external spewing of internalized haunts or simply a fun splash with no meaning at all.

Incubus frontman, Brandon Boyd, exudes art. Covered in unique and expressive tattoos, it’s almost as if he is art in human form. Whether he’s penning songs for Incubus, delivering a sweeping range of melodic vocals or painting a distinctive picture, Boyd embraces the arts as a trusted companion and complementary extension of himself. He spent the first week of December displaying new works and serving on a panel at the 2015 International Art Basel Conference.

If you explore Boyd’s personal website, the first thing you will notice is that you can go left or right. Enter for art on the left and music on the right. Though they each have their claimed space, “There is an area in the center where the hemispheres collide,” says Boyd.

After sharing a story about how we literally collided in Venice Beach a few years back, Boyd and I discuss in detail, the process behind expression through various artistic platforms; pausing only briefly to humorously witness a group youngsters posing by a tree for what would presumably be future acclaimed Instagram pictures.

To explore and purchase Brandon Boyd’s original art visit the shop at www.brandonboyd.me

Heart_Of_Gold_21.5x27.5
——————————————————————————————————————-

The passing of Scott Weiland is incredibly sad. Did you know Scott? You’ve crossed paths over the years correct?

We shared the stage quite a few times. Our mutual friend Brendan O’Brien produced a handful of their records. It really hits close to home.

I hadn’t seen or spoken to him in a handful of years, but the last couple of times I saw him, it seemed like he was doing really great. He was always such a sweet guy to me. We had a lot in common with people we worked with over the years. I am forever grateful to him and his band for being an inspiration for our band. I saw Stone Temple Pilots when I was kid and they were one of those bands that made us want to start being a band and playing music. It’s really a loss for sure and I feel for his family too.

How is the Art Basel conference going?

It’s kind of nuts, I’m sure you’ve been to music festivals of recent. They’re fun, but it’s also chaotic. It’s basically that but for art – which I am totally down far.

How long have you been into art, when did you start?

Expressing myself visually was my introduction. For as long as I can remember, I have been drawing things, writing things down and externalizing emotional circumstances. When I was a little kid I was very introverted. If I was sick or something and didn’t know what to do about it, I figured out if I would draw pictures of what was going on inside of me, what it felt like, it would eventually make me feel better. I learned at a very young age that externalizing these complex internal processes offered a kind of catharsis.

I have been doing art the whole time. While Incubus is on tour, and touring becomes this crazed, chaotic, monotonous whirlwind, I usually am able to escape into painting or drawing. I always have some basic form of pen and paper with me.

This past summer while we were on tour with the Deftones, I had a more elaborate watercolor kit with me and nice paper. Instead of going to the movies or the mall on a day off, I spent the summer basically hauled up in hotel rooms and would just paint. So what I am showing down here in Miami is basically the fruits of those labors.

That’s where the Five Modes of Transport came from right?

Yes, it is.

Did you ever have any formal art training?

After high school I was involved in what were probably my most formal art classes. I was studying life drawing and painting. I would learn to draw from a live model and then painting real life and still life images. I’ve also always been photographing. I’ve been working with some Polaroid’s, 35 millimeter and media format most of my adult life. With the digital evolution, I was able to excel more quickly due to the learning curve of the digital format. I do a bit of all of it, but none of it is technically, formally trained. It’s more what I call following my nose. It drives me down some really cool paths and I’ve learned from other artists who do have formal training, who go to art schools and have degrees. It’s funny because I envy their technique and they envy my untrained eye.

BB.miami.120115.2048-1287036
photo by: Justin Wysong

How do you determine how to channel your inspiration having these multiple outlets?

It’s a good question. They usually call out. One of the mediums calls out more loudly than the others and I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that I have to follow that, whichever voice is screaming the most loudly. Sometimes I do them back to back. I’ll be working on a painting and humming a melody. Normally when I’m working on a painting I don’t listen to music. Occasionally I will listen to a lecture or something, but usually I just listen to the glorious sounds of silence so I can let my own music filter through. So at times, they actually occur in a simultaneous kind of way.

Let’s say you just had a great morning surf and you are feeling very inspired. You are sitting back at your studio with a cup of coffee and you are looking at your instruments and your various art materials, are you going to music or art?

Some days it’s just a matter of focus. Like now, Incubus is actively writing an album. We have so much material we are working with right now and we’re in the process of finding the best of the best. There will be new Incubus music very soon. Some mornings though, I feel more focused like, no no no, I have to work on this song because Mikey (Einziger- Incubus guitar player) and I are getting together later today and I have to finish this one line in the lyrics. So I will force myself to hunker down and focus on just that. My favorite thing to do though is to allow a medium to dictate which direction I am going to go. That’s when I get the most art. When I let my ego surrender and I let the medium speak more. You’ll notice more flow in the work whether it’s a song or a painting.

At your home studio, it looks like all your worlds collide. I’ve seen pictures where your drums are amongst your canvases. Is it all just one large creative space?

It’s more hemispheric than you would think. The studio is above the garage in my house. One corner is almost entirely a space for making a mess, for throwing paint on a canvas and stuff like that. The other side has a pro tools rig and tons of drums and guitars. So it is hemispheric at first, but they do intersect at a certain point. You’ll see paint spilled over onto the drums.

With certain art, the work itself is the center of attention rather than just you. Is that important to you?

It’s an interesting challenge. I think it would be for anybody that came from a successful career in one regard, and then they are looking to diversify in other creative ways. It would be hard for anybody to see beyond why they showed up there in the first place. There are definitely a lot of people who show up to see the art that are avid listeners of Incubus. And that’s amazing. That’s so cool that they are so interested in us as a band that they are also interested in what we are doing when we are not playing music. It is definitely a long time dream of mine to have the work be seen and be appreciated beyond that. But that’s a real challenge. It’s actually harder for me to be taken seriously as an artist in it of itself. That’s OK with me though. I like a good challenge. In a way it inspires me to work a little bit harder.

When it comes to lyrics and music, you can express emotions in different ways – whether it’s a personal touch or telling a metaphorical story. With drawing or painting, you have the ability to be more mysterious where you can have no meaning at all, the viewer has to search for it or maybe it’s just a fun piece.

It’s certainly a little bit of all of those things. In music too, there’s such a thing a writing a song or a lyric just for the sake of writing and perhaps you are expressing nothing. Sometimes those songs are so much fun to perform and to listen to because they are mindless and meaningless. Then there are the songs that you had to take a second mortgage out on your sole because you are digging so deep. Those songs are equally as important. It’s the same thing with art. Some pieces are meaningless. They are just there because I felt like putting something down on paper. There are also things that are more complex in what they are trying to express. I think all of it is important. It’s our responsibility to interpret our experiences individually. That’s what we are. The human animal is a conduit. We’re the eye piece of consciousness.

I ask a lot about your behind the scenes process because I know for me, it’s obvious which subject matters go towards a song and which are written pieces. It can be an entirely different process. How about songwriting specifically? What made songs like “Lady Black,” and “Runaway Train,” solo material as opposed to being Incubus songs?

It’s always interesting writing music with Incubus. When I write with Michael, he’s like this wellspring of musical ideas. It’s constant. At a drop of a hat he will have a guitar riff or piano melody. It offers a creative challenge that I’ve been in love with the entire time we’ve been doing it.

When I write music outside of Incubus and those two songs you mentioned in particular, they started as just melodies with dispersed lyrics attached. There was no music whatsoever. A melody just emerged and lyrics just kind of showed up. It’s a different way of writing songs, it’s a different kind of challenge, but it’s just as important to allow all of the different ways that music or art wants to come through us. So I had these melodies, like with “Lady Black,” and I sang it to Brendan O’Brien. He really liked it and started playing this guitar riff around it. It’s really a totally different way of writing songs, it’s fun. Have you ever tried that? Writing the melodies first with a lyric?

It’s funny you should say that. With what I’ve been writing lately, that’s exactly how I’ve been doing it. Mostly because I want to immediately capture the subject matter that’s ripe in mind. It’s certainly been challenging since my process is usually music first, but just as you said, it’s a fun challenge and I find it creates unique melodies because you don’t comprise the melody, since that’s what started the whole thing.

Yeah, right on. We shouldn’t dictate how a song is supposed to be written. Just write ‘em. Even if it’s pounding out a rhythm on a coffee table. There are probably countless amazing songs that have been written like that. There’s no one way to do it. That’s what’s so intriguing about it. You can write a song in so many different ways, and that’s the most beautiful thing.

I completely agree. Speaking of Incubus, 2015 marks a major milestone and accomplishment as its 20 years since your first release of Fungus Amongus. Congratulations on that. What does it mean to you now?

Thank you. It makes me smile. It makes me smile that we’ve had this incredible, mostly unexpected life. You don’t know what you are going to get into when you’re a kid. There’s so much pressure in America around – what are you going to do, what are you going to be when you grow up? That gets asked of us so often. I can recall being six and hearing – what do you want to be when you grow up? And feeling like – how the fuck do I know, I’m six! Can I just eat my cheerios please!

That’s still my response.

(Laughs) mine too sometimes.

I think it’s good to set goals and follow through with them, but there are things that happen to us while we are making those plans that usually end up defining our life. Incubus has been such an unexpected pleasure. And the space it created to continue to express ourselves individually, in my case being here at Art Basel, showing art to an international art community. It’s so amazingly unexpected and so welcomed that I can’t help but smile.

What’s up next for Incubus?

We actually had written almost another album worth of material before we left for the summer tour in the states. The plan was to come home, immediately record that material and have it out before the holidays. But we came home and started writing and then kept writing, and we started seeing ideas emerge that just eclipsed the other ones. So we decided to keep writing, and we’re sifting through tons of material, trying to create the best of the best. We plan on having new music out, I would assume by early 2016. We are definitely going to be on tour as well, from the spring on I would assume.

Is it going to be Trust Fall Side B?

As far as I know it will be Trust Fall Side B, but it will be a longer than an EP. There’s so much music that we are trying to focus on it being more of an extended thing. More of an LP.

What was the intent behind having a Trust Fall Side A and B vs. creating a full length record from the start?

It was a few things. We got together unexpectedly to start writing. It all came from the opportunity to work at Hans Zimmer’s studio in Santa Monica. He offered us a room at his compound. We didn’t have a plan to make a record. We didn’t have a manager or a record label at the time. We were off in the woods and it was fun to not have a plan for the first time in such a long time. But we then got this opportunity to work in this incredible creative space. We just set up our gear and started tinkering. Really quickly songs started to emerge and we saw that a handful of them we really liked and they offered us the opportunity to go out and tour as well. We picked the songs we liked the most.

A lot of it also started as simple conversations amongst the band. This in particular, was a conversation revolving around how some of us missed Side A, Side B. Growing up listening to vinyl records, there’s a moment when the needle hits the center of the album and you have to physically take the needle off of the album, turn the record over and the experience reboots on Side B. Same thing with the tape experience. It was a quick stop, then you have to eject it, flip it over and the experience starts over into the next realm. It created once again, almost this hemispheric experience. We were also acknowledging that nobody, including us, has the attention span for an entire record, front-to-back, start-to-finish. So we decided to break it up. We already had an EP with Side A, we could put it out and go on tour and create Side B in a little bit. It felt like we can have our cake and eat it too.

One of the greatest rock shows in my opinion, was The Who – VH1 – Rock Honors show back in 2008 You guys were a part of that so I have to ask, was that as special of an experience as it came across to be?

We were honored to be asked. We were only supposed to play one song. That was more than enough for us. We learned the track and rehearsed it quite a bit. The Foo Fighters were playing too and when we got there, Dave Grohl approached us and asked us if we would play the second song that they were supposed to play because he was sick and his voice was messed up. We were like …uhhh … yes. The second song we played, “I Can’t Explain,” we learned in the trailer. Then we went on live TV and played it. It was cool and the fact that we pulled off made it even more fun. Getting to share the stage with The Foo Fighters, Tenacious D, The Who and all the others that were there was incredible. For us as a band, it was a really important night. To be able to be around all those guys too and speak to them was pretty special. I think back on that night very often as well. I love stuff like that.

We got to do something similar a few years before with The Pretenders. It was them, Iggy Pop, Garbage and Kings of Leon. That was also a great night. I’m a big Pretenders fan and a huge Iggy Pop fan. Being able to be around those people was huge for us as well.

It was also around the time period, with a year or two, where both you and Eddie Vedder put out your first respective solo albums. Did you and Vedder talk about that process at all?

I talked to him a little bit about it. We both love Brendan O’Brien. He’s an amazing musician. He’s so much fun to write with too. He’s got this little kid energy when you put a guitar in his hand. If you go anywhere near him when he has a guitar, a song is going to happen. It’s amazing. I really love Eddie’s side projects that he’s done. He’s such a talented guy. We are so lucky again to both have our cake and eat it too. We have our bands that we love and adore which is the main course in our lives, but then we get to have these side projects that offer us so much fulfillment as well.

You have a great quote which reads “Happiness balances delicately on the wings of the act of creativity itself, not at the finish line.” I can relate and take that as – the real enjoyment in creating art or music is the act of actually doing it. Being able to go someplace else and get completely submersed in the process. Is that what you mean?

In a matter of speaking, yes. There’s something that happens when we are involved in our own creative processes. There are moments that I identify with in an egoic sense. Like – Hi my name is Brandon Boyd, nice to meet you. Hey, that’s my coffee don’t touch it. The ego that most of us identify with, when we’re involved in the creating, that tends to go away temporarily. Maybe we forget about it and we get lost in these processes. I think the reason that brings happiness along with it is because that’s probably a truer expression of self than the – fuck you that coffee is mine version. We get to let go of ego temporarily and fall into a place that is a closer description to the real self. It’s a beautiful experience. You don’t have to be a painter, photographer or a musician to experience it, you just have to have your single-minded activity every day that you indulge in and it’s right there.

Follow Jeff Gorra on Twitter

EvaInGrey_26.5x34

STP & Velvet Revolver Members Attend Scott Weiland’s Funeral

Photo edited by Alternative Nation contributor Dustin Halter

Members of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver attended Scott Weiland’s funeral yesterday at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Chris Kushner, the wife of Velvet Revolver guitarist Dave Kushner, discussed the service on Instagram.

“A very sad day when u bury a friend. He was a good man. Don’t believe everything u read. Remember, we were all there.
#velvetrelvolver @slash #officialduffmckagan @davekushner @bigdrums #scottweiland @susanholmesmckagan @aceharper #ripscottweiland”

She later commented, “It was filled w/ love and funny beautiful stories about Scott ”

kodachromegirl commented, “It was really a beautiful service. Good seeing you. Nothing will ever extinguish the way he lit up the stage. I hope he has the found peace he deserves.”

Wildabouts drummer Joey Castillo commented, “He was more than a good man, he was Human…RIP Scotty.”

Velvet Revolver released the following statement following Weiland’s death last week:

We are deeply saddened to learn of the loss of our old friend and bandmate, Scott Weiland. We experience a good chunk of life with Scott, and even in his darkest times, we all had hope and love for him. His artistry will live on, of that, there is no doubt.

Deepest condolences and sadness are for his children, Noah and Lucy. We all travelled around this world together on tour; our band, wives, and kids…and we grew to a big family that still remains to this day.

It’s just so sad and brutal from any perspective.

Rest in peace Scott.

Slash, Duff, Matt, and Dave

Final Photo Of Scott Weiland At Bar Released

The final known photo of late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland from just one day before he died has surfaced, reports DNAInfo. The photo was taken on Wednesday, December 2nd in Elmhurst, Illinois at Mack’s Golden Pheasant. Retired postal worker Douglas Wigand approached Weiland and his Wildabouts bassist Tommy Black at the bar, and talked to them for 45 minutes. Weiland and the Wildabouts were making a pit stop in Elmhurt on their way to Bloomington, Minnesota, where Weiland died the next night. He called Weiland and Black ‘nice guys.’ Below is a photo of Weiland, Wigand, and Black.

weilandfinalphoto

Stone Temple Pilots’ original manager Steve Stewart has provided Alternative Nation exclusively with his tribute to his friend Scott Weiland. Stewart managed STP from 1990 to 2000:

I’ve known Scott since the mid-80s, when my band and his band played gigs together in Orange County, CA. As we grew up, his path took him to further iterations of the band, from Soi Disant to Might Joe Young, while I went to school, and went on to work in the business side of music. Our paths crossed again in 1990, when he and Robert DeLeo asked me to lunch, and asked me if I could help get them a record deal. I was working for Ice T’s manager, and had made some contacts in the industry. Almost two years later, we had a deal from Atlantic Records on the table. I worked with Scott and the band through their next four records, and had a ringside seat for what became one of the most unique stories in modern rock, and the end of an era in the music industry.

What always struck me most about Scott was how alone he really was. For all the people and things he had around, I always felt he was somehow separated from people. Sometimes, all he wanted was someone to sit with him – I remember one late night a long time ago, when we were facing a long night on a bus, after a gig. The bus was filled with maybe 12 people, all of them asleep after working all night. Scott was in the front lounge, behind the driver, and I was sitting up front, watching the road. As I got up and started toward my bunk to grab some sleep, he looked up from the video game he was playing and said, “Will you stay with me? I don’t want to be here alone.” I thought that was an odd thing to say, as there were a dozen souls within 15 feet of him. This has always stayed with me, and I saw other examples of this through the years of how much he needed someone to share the journey with. Even though no one could ever really satisfy that need, I think it was something that he always yearned for, and maybe, never found.

I could always see the little boy in him, looking for his dad’s approval. Though the years and the trappings of fame often obscured it, every once in a while, I’d catch a glimpse of it through that momentary little smile he’d shoot me after he nailed something. Those were the instants when he was truly proud of himself, and that was the Scott I’ll always remember.

I thought he’d always beat his demons, and maybe in the end, he finally did. My prayers are with his family and children.

scotthomesick

Scott Weiland’s Funeral Is Today

Photo: Jamie Weiland

Susan Holmes McKagan, the wife of former Velvet Revolver bassist Duff McKagan, discusses her thoughts on Scott Weiland heading into his funeral today on Instagram:

Bet u didn’t know this.. Duff N’ I met a nice couple, who met at a #VelvetRevolver show, they always remind us of how VR’s music brought their hearts+souls together, and are happily married now 5 yrs.. They are so sweet & thankful to the guys for their truly awe inspiring shows, and music that brought them and so many people together! RIP #Scott ✨ Today is your funeral, and a very difficult one for Duff N’ I and so many others.. We love u Scott #Prayers4All Sending love+light

She also wrote:

“Remember me w smiles N laughter, for that’s how I’ll remember you. If you can only remember me in dejection and tears then don’t remember me at all.” Saw this quote & somehow seemed to make sense.. Let’s remember his strengths, and the talented frontman and songs he contributed to us. Rest in Peace #ScottWeiland ( w #Slash #DuffMcKagan) aka #VelvetRevolver ✨

Alternative Nation sends its best wishes to Scott Weiland’s friends, family, and bandmates on this difficult day.

Friend Says Scott Weiland ‘Was A Very Frustrated Dad’

Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images

Joe Howard, a friend of Wildabouts bassist Tommy Black and Scott Weiland, had lunch with Weiland and Black just a couple of weeks ago when they played at Penn’s Peak in Pennsylvania shortly before Weiland’s death. Howard responded to Mary Weiland’s open letter to Rolling Stone by stating that Weiland had told him he was upset that ‘his ex moved the kids out of state and shut him out from them.’ Howard has shared further comments regarding his lunch with Weiland with Alternative Nation.

I’d like to note that Alternative Nation isn’t seeking to back up the views of any party involved with this tragedy, nor discredit Mary Weiland’s letter.  Scott’s fatherhood has simply become part of the news with the Rolling Stone article, and the responses of people who had talked to Weiland about the issue are part of the news.

Read Howard’s latest comments to Alternative Nation below.

“I posted word for word what he said during our conversation. That’s all. She didn’t make it easy for him and he wasn’t happy about it.”

He later said, “She made it tough for him. Her way or no way.”

“We were cool, we talked about the kids and he was getting upset… I didn’t dig I just listened to a very frustrated Dad. Scott was totally fine, not high at all. We had a great conversation. Not sure of what the situation with his ex or kids. Not my business, I just posted what he said that totally changed his mood. That was a cool lunch with rock n roll royalty!”

Howard originally stated yesterday, “Wow! It’s pretty funny that I sat at a lunch last week with Scott and Tommy Black and Scott was very upset at the fact that his ex moved the kids out if state and shut him out from them. He was upset and frustrated about it. We got into a ‘I miss my kids’ conversation and he was visually upset by this. So much that I had to change the topic. I felt reading this that there were a bunch of cheap shots written and some untruths. Scott loved his kids and was totally upset by the situation between his ex and kids. The last thing he said was I haven’t seen my kids in over a year and I love and miss them very much. Glasses came off and his eyes were red. Remember, there are three sides to every story. Scott is not here to defend himself so I had to at least share this. My heart goes out to his children.”

Mary Weiland released an open letter last night criticizing her now late ex-husband for being absent from their children’s lives over the last few years.

Mary said, “I spent countless hours trying to calm his paranoid fits, pushing him into the shower and filling him with coffee, just so that I could drop him into the audience at Noah’s talent show, or Lucy’s musical. Those short encounters were my attempts at giving the kids a feeling of normalcy with their dad. But anything longer would often turn into something scary and uncomfortable for them.”

She later added, “When Scott did move on to another relationship, I hoped it would inspire him to grow. I had often encouraged him to date a ‘normal’ girl, a woman who was also a mother, someone who had the energy that I no longer had to love him. Instead, when he remarried, the children were replaced. They were not invited to his wedding; child support checks often never arrived. Our once sweet Catholic boy refused to watch the kids participate in Christmas Eve plays because he was now an atheist. They have never set foot into his house, and they can’t remember the last time they saw him on a Father’s Day.”

Below is a photo of Joe Howard having lunch with Scott Weiland and Tommy Black.

Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 12.25.06 AM

Scott Weiland Had Retirement Plan, Wanted To Move To Wine Country

Photo: Jamie Weiland

In one of his final ever interviews with LiveForLiveMusic, late Stone Temple Pilots frontman revealed he ‘hopefully’ would be retired from the music industry by 2025.

“I want to move out of L.A. and hopefully to Sonoma. I want to continue making records and touring until it’s no longer possible.” He said he was “happily married and also the stepfather of a great kid named Wolfie.”

Weiland also had plans to return to the studio next month to work on his next album with the Wildabouts. “We’re going to make a record in January and start writing sessions soon. Doing demos and touring, and go back to recording. There will be a record in 2016.”

You can now donate to MusiCares​ in memory of Scott Weiland by clicking here. When donating, for donation type select ‘tribute.’ On the second page, put In Memory of Scott Weiland. You will then have the option to write a personal message. Please include either Scott’s name in the memo line, or add a note with the gift so MusiCares can be sure to properly credit it. Notes and donor names will be shared with the Weiland family.

MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. MusiCares also focuses the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community.

Scott Weiland, the legendary voice of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver, passed away last Thursday night at the age of 48.

Narcotics Found Near Scott Weiland’s Body

Earlier today, we reported the list of drugs that were reportedly found on Scott Weiland’s tour bus when he died last Thursday, but a report has now surfaced revealing that narcotics were found in plain view near Scott Weiland’s body on his tour bus.

According to the Hennepin County warrant and affidavit, Weiland’s body was found “alone in a bedroom” on the bus where an “unknown white substance packaged in baggies” was “located in the bedroom in plain view.”

The warrant specifies that the “2 clean baggies with white substance” were packaged “common with the way narcotics are packaged.” Police separately confirmed cocaine was found on the tour bus.

Earlier today, TMZ obtained a copy of the search warrant Bloomington, MN cops got to search late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland’s tour bus after his death — and it shows they found at least 2 bags of a white substance. They’ve already said that substance tested positive for cocaine.

Also on the bus — a generic version of Xanax, 2 different brands of sleeping pills, Buprenorphine … a synthetic opiate painkiller, and Viagra. There was also Ziprasidone … which is used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Scott was diagnosed as bipolar in 2001.

According to the docs, all of those drugs were found in a bedroom on the bus. Cops also found one bag of a green, leafy substance. Weiland died on his tour bus in Bloomington, MN last Thursday at the age of 48.

Corey Taylor & Dave Navarro Perform “Sex Type Thing” In Honor Of Scott Weiland

Royals Machines, featuring Corey Taylor (Slipknot), Dave Navarro (Jane’s Addiction), Chris Chaney (Jane’s Addiction), and Josh Freese (Nine Inch Nails) covered Stone Temple Pilots’ “Sex Type Thing” in honor of Scott Weiland at the Roxy last night. Watch video below.

You can now donate to MusiCares​ in memory of Scott Weiland by clicking here. When donating, for donation type select ‘tribute.’ On the second page, put In Memory of Scott Weiland. You will then have the option to write a personal message. Please include either Scott’s name in the memo line, or add a note with the gift so MusiCares can be sure to properly credit it. Notes and donor names will be shared with the Weiland family.

MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. MusiCares also focuses the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community.

Scott Weiland, the legendary voice of Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver, passed away on Thursday night at the age of 48.

Listen To Chris Cornell’s Tribute To Scott Weiland “Say Hello 2 Heaven”

Listen to Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell perform Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” in tribute to the late Scott Weiland below!

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell paid tribute to late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland at his recent concerts in Melbourne. Cornell dedicated his performance of Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” to Weiland at a show, according to a fan. “Say Hello 2 Heaven” originally was recorded as a tribute to the Grunge era’s first casualty, Mother Love Bone singer Andy Wood. MusicFeeds and an Alternative Nation reader report that “Higher Truth” was dedicated to Weiland at Friday’s show. The reader told us, “It was very beautiful and amazing …Respect.” Fans have praised Cornell’s performance on Twitter. Weiland was found dead on his tour bus in Minnesota on Thursday night. He was 48.

Right now is a time for fans to really stop and appreciate some of the voices we still have left from the Grunge era like Chris Cornell, Eddie Vedder, Billy Corgan, and Mark Lanegan. Rest in peace Scott Weiland, Layne Staley, Kurt Cobain, Andy Wood, Mike Starr, Shannon Hoon, and the rest of a list that is far too long.

Stone Temple Pilots have released the following statement on Scott Weiland’s death:

Dear Scott,

Let us start by saying thank you for sharing your life with us.

Together we crafted a legacy of music that has given so many people happiness and great memories.

The memories are many, and they run deep for us.

We know amidst the good and the bad you struggled, time and time again.

It’s what made you who you were.

You were gifted beyond words, Scott.

Part of that gift was part of your curse.

With deep sorrow for you and your family, we are saddened to see you go.

All of our love and respect.

We will miss you brother,

Robert, Eric, Dean

Listen To Howard Stern’s Emotional Scott Weiland Tribute

Photo and audio: Howard Stern

Howard Stern discussed Scott Weiland’s death and Stone Temple Pilots’ music on his show yesterday. Weiland was a frequent guest on his show over the last two decades.

MarksFriggin recapped Howard’s tribute. Howard said he wants to say a few words about Scott Weiland since he passed away a few days ago. Howard said he was truly one of the greats. Howard said he read an article about Scott’s life and he thinks that Scott wasn’t given his due in the article. Howard said he remembers when Stone Temple Pilots came on the scene. He said they were around in the 90s and it was after Nirvana and Pearl Jam. Howard said they were around at the same time. Howard said they were a reaction to Glam Rock. He said they had some of that but had some grunge too. Howard said he went to an Stone Temple Pilots show and he was blown away by their stage presentation. Howard said they had a set that was like the set of a living room. He said the guys sat around like you were in their living room and it was really cool. Howard said Scott had one of the strangest voices in rock too. He said he had a growl. He said that there was a growl to his voice and a sweetness too. Howard said he was a great front man.

Fred played some of one of their appearances on his show. That was their performance of ”Vasoline.” Howard asked Fred to play ”Plush” next. Howard said just listen to his voice. He said Scott wrote those lyrics. He said just listen to that. He let the song play a little bit.

Howard said Scott was a sweet guy and he won everyone over when they were on the show. Howard said he’s sad for him and that he’s gone. Howard said he’s sad that he had such a troubled life. Howard said he left behind a great body of work that will live on. Howard said Scott learned how to turn on audiences and all of that experience is gone. Howard said he gets sad thinking about that. Howard said every time he came in there he acted like everything was fine.

Howard said they once asked Scott how he got started with heroin and he thinks he enjoyed talking to them when he was in there. Howard said Scott mentioned a guy who turned him on to heroin but didn’t blame the guy for it. Howard said they had a story a few years ago about Scott turning himself in to the cops when he thought they were looking at him on the street.

Howard played a clip of Scott Weiland talking about all of the records they were selling and how they had to go out to tour to make money so he didn’t get any time off.

Howard played Scott performing ”Interstate Love Song. Howard said he came in with Velvet Revolver too. Howard said he thinks that Scott always enjoyed coming in there. He said he was a really nice guy. He said Benjy has his shirt off while this song plays. Robin said there’s a tribute. Howard said they were a good ballsy rock band. He said he felt bad for the Deleo brothers because they had to deal with Scott’s problems. Robin said they did the best they could. She said they got back together a bunch of times.

Howard said Scott was only 48 years old. Robin said they say they found cocaine in his bedroom but they still have to do toxicology on him. Howard said he listened to a few of their albums over the weekend. He said he was such a great front man. Howard said he was a great guy. He played Stone Temple Pilots performing a cover of Led Zeppelin’s ”Dancing Days”. Howard said he was surprised when Scott was into Zeppelin. Howard said they just loved music. Robin said this was a great cover. Howard said he remembers them sitting there in the K-Rock studio performing the song. Howard said it may have been 1996 or so. He said it may not have been. He said he’s confused.

Howard had Stone Temple Pilots performing a cover of ”Revolution” too. Robin said you can hear that growl in that one. Howard asked if he’s the best. He said that’s Scott Weiland. He said he didn’t use Autotune. Howard said that song isn’t easy to sing either. Howard said he heard someone fucking up a John Lennon song the other night. He said Scott is so good. He said that’s why Stone Temple Pilots needed him. He said those fucking drugs… He said he doesn’t get why so many artists succumb to it. Robin said many artists are very sensitive.

Howard said Scott put so much energy into performing. He said he’s so sorry to see him gone at the age of 48. He let ”Revolution” play through and then went to break.

Ex-STP Manager Remembers Scott Weiland: ‘I Saw The Little Boy In Him, Looking For Dad’s Approval’

Stone Temple Pilots’ original manager Steve Stewart has provided Alternative Nation exclusively with his tribute to his friend Scott Weiland. Stewart managed STP from 1990 to 2000:

I’ve known Scott since the mid-80s, when my band and his band played gigs together in Orange County, CA. As we grew up, his path took him to further iterations of the band, from Soi Disant to Might Joe Young, while I went to school, and went on to work in the business side of music. Our paths crossed again in 1990, when he and Robert DeLeo asked me to lunch, and asked me if I could help get them a record deal. I was working for Ice T’s manager, and had made some contacts in the industry. Almost two years later, we had a deal from Atlantic Records on the table. I worked with Scott and the band through their next four records, and had a ringside seat for what became one of the most unique stories in modern rock, and the end of an era in the music industry.

What always struck me most about Scott was how alone he really was. For all the people and things he had around, I always felt he was somehow separated from people. Sometimes, all he wanted was someone to sit with him – I remember one late night a long time ago, when we were facing a long night on a bus, after a gig. The bus was filled with maybe 12 people, all of them asleep after working all night. Scott was in the front lounge, behind the driver, and I was sitting up front, watching the road. As I got up and started toward my bunk to grab some sleep, he looked up from the video game he was playing and said, “Will you stay with me? I don’t want to be here alone.” I thought that was an odd thing to say, as there were a dozen souls within 15 feet of him. This has always stayed with me, and I saw other examples of this through the years of how much he needed someone to share the journey with. Even though no one could ever really satisfy that need, I think it was something that he always yearned for, and maybe, never found.

I could always see the little boy in him, looking for his dad’s approval. Though the years and the trappings of fame often obscured it, every once in a while, I’d catch a glimpse of it through that momentary little smile he’d shoot me after he nailed something. Those were the instants when he was truly proud of himself, and that was the Scott I’ll always remember.

I thought he’d always beat his demons, and maybe in the end, he finally did. My prayers are with his family and children.

scotthomesick

Listen To Scott Weiland’s Final Song “Back to the City”

Photo: Jamie Weiland

Scott Weiland released a new track called “Back to the City” in October for free via a ‘Scott Weiland’ app. You can listen below, and hear a high quality version in the app. The track was recorded prior to Jeremy Brown’s March 2015 death, and the app was actually dedicated to Brown. “Back to the City” ended up being the last new release of new music during Weiland’s lifetime, as the legendary Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver frontman passed away on Thursday night.

The song is features guitar sounds that are reminiscent of Velvet Revolver and Queens of the Stone Age. ‘Can’t you stay/here with me/you’re the woman that makes me feel free/I want you/you want me/don’t break my heart if you want me to be.’ He sings in the infectious chorus: ‘Movin on/goin’ back to the city.’ He also sings, ‘On my way back to you/always do what you want me to do/looking round/close to you/your beating heart is the one that is true.’ The lyrics are very romantic, much like much of Blaster, with Weiland’s wife Jamie serving as his muse.

On my way, back to you
Always Do what you want me to do
Looking ’round, close to you
Your beating heart is the one that is true

All the way I’m going back to my baby
I got a vision that she’s comeback to me
So it’s true

Can’t you stay, here with me
You’re the woman that makes me feel free
I want you, you want me
Don’t break my heart if you want it to be

Running on, running on, running on
Going Back to the City

Looking up, looking down, all around
You’re the one that I needed

On my way, back to you
Always do what you want me to do
Looking ’round, close to you
Your beating heart is the one that is true

Moving on, moving on, moving on
Going Back to the City

Looking up, looking down, all around
You’re the one that I needed

You can’t see that we are sheltered by the
Night
You and me we can be the best we’ve ever
Tried

Moving on, moving on, moving on
Going Back to the City

Looking up, looking down, all around
You’re the one that I needed