Tag Archives: Montage of Heck

Kurt Cobain Sings About Not Selling Records & Smoking Hash In New Punk Rocker

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features an unreleased song called “Rehash.” “Rehash” sounds like Henry Rollins era Black Flag thrash-style with a heavy guitar riff and heavy screams, while the chorus (Rehash, Rehash) doesn’t sound at all like Cobain’s regular vocals. It’s clearly an in-development idea, as Cobain recites where he wants the solo, by orally saying: “Solo” as he plays the riff, over and over again. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

“Rehash” lyrics:

I tried out for the high school band
then I tried to join the crowd
My records didn’t sell
Now I keep them very healthy in my cellar what do you want?
????
????
????
????

Chorus:

Rehash x 15

Post Chorus/ Bridge( ?) :

Playin’ in a Bar Band
Playin in a bar band
Playin in a bar band
Thank God I’m not bland
Playin in a bar band
playing in a bar band
Thank God I’m not bland
Playin’ in a bar band

Rehash x 15
OH!!!

Kurt’s speaking voice: “Solo”

“Solo”

“Solo”
“Solo”
“Solo”

“Chorus”
“Chorus”

Rehash x13
“Smoke hash”

Check out the lyrics to other unreleased Kurt Cobain tracks from Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings on Alternative Nation’s articles on “She Only Lies” and the new version of “Do Re Mi.” Also read our in-depth track by track review of Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings.

Kurt Cobain Sings ‘I Really Hate Her’ In New Song ‘She Only Lies’

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features an unreleased song called “She Only Lies.” It is a haunting song, with dark lyrics alluding to guilt and self-condemnation, along with shame towards the other person. This could’ve easily been another song by Nirvana, with such a great bass-line. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

“She Only Lies”

She only lies
Just to save my feelings
I cry inside
Just to make to her feel good
I hold inside
Guilt that isn’t real in
I find the lie
Just to burn my eyes

Oh, Oh

She only lies
Just to save my feelings
I only cry
Just to make her feel guilty
I cry inspite
Just to save my reasons
I know its right
Cause i wont hurt to die…
I love her
Oh i really hate her
And i know that you will hate her too
If you were given half the chance at all

I’ll definitely be listening to Kurt Cobain’s Home Recordings, not just for historical value, but as it was intended: as a way to get inside Kurt’s mind and listen how he composes songs the way he does. It feels exactly like you’re in the room with Kurt, as he’s practicing the chords, tuning the guitar, or just goofing off with one of his voices for comedy. In conclusion, Montage Of Heck: The Home Recordings (Deluxe Ed.) is exactly what any hardcore Nirvana/ Kurt Cobain fan would love, to understand the creative process – along with the film, of Kurt Cobain. 5/5 Stars.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, will be released by Universal Music Enterprises in multiple formats, including the Super Deluxe Edition as well as in Blu-ray, DVD and digital video formats. The soundtrack album, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will also be released on CD and digitally on November 13, 2015. A 2LP vinyl edition of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will follow on December 4, 2015. In addition, a 7-inch single featuring “And I Love Her” and “Sappy (Early Demo)” is also scheduled for release on November 20, 2015.

Read Alternative Nation’s full review of Kurt Cobain’s Home Recordings by clicking here.

Kurt Cobain Contemplates Afterlife In Chilling Final Recording

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features a new version of “Do Re Mi” from March 1994. The track is one of Cobain’s last known home recordings, and this new version features different lyrics. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

Wish me was
Wish me twice
She’s reflamed beside you
Youuuu x 5
Wants me me gone
Right now I know that I need
Dreaming
Dream
Dreaming
Like a man
I complain
To see thee
….
…..
…..
Finally have to see me
Judge dear god
What I know
I wish I could see me

Sunken back into your dream
Stretch me down
Fuck me up
I wish I was greeting
Let me lie
I wish I might
I wish I could
screaming

Greet me some day
And I will fall
And I will call
And greet thee
(repeated Greet thee)

Drag me down
And finally I’m gone…
…..

Praise god…

I had the privilege of receiving and reviewing an advance copy of the upcoming Kurt Cobain album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings album for Alternative Nation. It’s basic, low-fi, and stripped down to the bare bones. It’s raw! The album jumps straight into Cobain’s psyche. From the opening strumming and mumbles on “The Yodel Song,” to the ever-angelic, elongated, work-in-progress take of “Do Re Mi,” the album is a trip inside of Cobain’s creative process.  It even features a track that easily could have been a Nirvana pop hit.

Sound collage experiments like “Montage of Kurt I” & II,” “Kurt’s Audio Collage,” “Scream,” and “Kurt’s Ambiance” provide a sonic representation of what was written in Cobain’s journals. This is where noise rock experimental influences like William S. Burroughs (Kurt had read Naked Lunch after getting it in a bookstall in London while on tour), Sonic Youth, and Scratch Acid are evident.

The spoken-word comedy bits like the satirical advertisement for the “Capitol Lake Jam Commercial,” “Rhesus Monkey,” “Sea Monkeys,” “Underground Celebritism,” as well as “Aberdeen,” and “Beans” show the foray of Kurt’s genius at work, merging music with comedy.

Instrumental pieces like “Reverb Experiment,” with its intense feedback, sounds like an end-type jam at a Nirvana gig, as well as a homage to the Melvins. “Retreat,” “Letters To Frances,” and “The Happy Guitar” show off other styles of guitar playing that Kurt didn’t show off in live performances with his band Nirvana. This is a new kind of Kurt Cobain, as you’ve never heard him before.

The album also features acoustic demos of 5 songs, that would later be released on subsequent Nirvana albums, both live, and in the studio (“Been A Son,” “Scoff,” “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle,” “Sappy,” “Something In the Way”).

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck Super Deluxe Edition and Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings both include the highly anticipated soundtrack, an aural complement to the documentary in both concept and experience. Comprised from various early and raw cassette recordings made by Kurt alone, the soundtrack allows a rare, unfiltered glimpse into Cobain’s creative progression.

You can read Alternative Nation’s full review of Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings by clicking here.

Is New Album Exploiting Kurt Cobain?

Kurt Cobain has been in the headlines a lot this year, with the Montage of Heck documentary premiering on HBO and the murder conspiracy docudrama Soaked in Bleach coming out this year. While it’s been debated for years on if Kurt Cobain has been exploited by various people for profit since his 1994 suicide, the upcoming Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings release featuring previously unheard Kurt Cobain home recordings has sparked a new debate in the Nirvana fanbase. Is the album exploiting Kurt, and would Kurt have wanted this material released?

Below is Alternative Nation reporters Brett Buchanan, Mike Mazzarone, Jeff Gorra, and Doug McCausland’s take on the release of the album, and also a telling quote from Kurt Cobain himself on his unreleased recordings.

Brett Buchanan: I think the $150 deluxe edition is ridiculous price wise, the only issue I personally have with the project is the exploitation of fans who have to buy everything Nirvana related with that price. Charging $30 for a CD/digital only deluxe edition with every song would make a lot more sense, with a pricier version with all of the separate goodies on a higher price tier. I think it’s cool that there is some previously unheard material coming out, it keeps Kurt’s memory alive much better than the endless bullshit murder conspiracy theories.

When it comes to the debate on the release of the material, I can see both sides. Kurt may not have wanted some of these to come out, but on the other hand, Frances has been involved in the ‘Montage of Heck’ project the whole way through, and as Kurt’s only child, it’s really up to her as to what will happen. We’ve also seen similar stuff like this happen with other deceased artists, with ‘new’ albums from Michael Jackson and Tupac being dragged out for years. It’s the music ‘business,’ and the bottom line is unreleased Kurt Cobain recordings are good for business. At least they’re not recording “Do Re Mi” with the guy from Puddle of Mudd on vocals (that will be on the 2027 Nirvana 40th anniversary box set).

kurtdeluxe

Mike Mazzarone: Is it really exploitation when it’s lost, never before heard material from Cobain? Perhaps calling it a ‘solo album’ and releasing it as an ‘album’ is a bit much, but I think we have a bit of thin line of exploitation and paying tribute to Cobain and his fans by giving those said fans this new material. I think Cobain’s followers deserve to hear this. Was With The Lights Out exploitation? I don’t think so.

We see post-humorous releases all the time. It’s really nothing new.

Jeff Gorra: My thoughts are — it’s perplexing to me as to why all of this now? There was a box set in 2004 – With The Lights Out, if this was intended to be released or something for the diehard Nirvana fan, that could have been the time. It’s hard not to think of it as exploiting to some degree, but I think people will always be fascinated in the mystery of who really was Kurt Cobain.

Doug McCausland: I find the release of his private journals to be more offensive than the release of music he wanted the world to hear. It’s obviously exploitive because, in the end, it’s lining the pockets of wealthy people who probably didn’t know Kurt, but I also think the fans deserve to hear the songs.

Kurt Cobain (March 1992 Flipside Interview): When embarrassing things come out, like stuff I’ve done in my basement on a 2-track or a boombox that are basically just unwritten songs or pieces of songs…when those come out it’s really embarrassing and it frustrates me.

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Listen To Kurt Cobain 1988 Demo From New Album

With the world waiting in anticipation, the powers that be have brought us a track from the Montage of Heck soundtrack, to be released on November 6th. The soundtrack will feature largely unreleased material. However, this version of “Sappy” is nothing unreleased.

This version of “Sappy”, although much different and noticeably slower and quieter, this version can be found on bootlegs occasionally as “Sad”, because the song has a much sadder tone than the other known versions of “Sappy”.

Below is the rumored tracklisting for the standard 13-track edition of the soundtrack and details on different editions:

Alternative Nation has tracked down the tracklisting for Kurt Cobain’s new solo album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings, set for release on November 13th.

1. The Yodel Song
2. Been A Son
3. The Happy Guitar
4. Clean Up Before She Comes
5. Reverb Experiment
6. You Can’t Change Me/Burn My Britches/Something In The Way
7. Scoff
8. Desire
9. And I Love Her
10. Sappy
11. Letters To Frances
12. Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle
13. She Only Lies

KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK SUPER DELUXE EDITION and KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS both include the highly anticipated soundtrack, an aural complement to the documentary in both concept and experience. Comprised from various early and raw cassette recordings made by Kurt alone, the soundtrack allows a rare, unfiltered glimpse into Cobain’s creative progression from early song snippets and short demos to musical experiments and ultimately, pieces of songs or lyrics that eventually appeared on later Nirvana albums.

KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK SUPER DELUXE EDITION will include the 2 hour plus, full-length feature film and 48 minutes of bonus interviews on Blu-ray and DVD, a 31 track deluxe soundtrack on CD and cassette, a 160-page hardbound book with extended interviews and images from the Cobain archive, a puzzle with a collectable storage container, movie poster, postcards and bookmark. The 31 track deluxe soundtrack CD is exclusively available in the Super Deluxe Edition and showcases tracks from the documentary including spoken word, demos and full songs.

KURT COBAIN – MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS soundtrack will be released in two stand-alone physical formats: a 31 track deluxe album available on 2LP vinyl and a standard edition 13 track CD. The standard soundtrack focuses on the music discovered on Cobain’s personal cassettes. The soundtrack will also be available in standard and deluxe digital editions.

 

 

New Kurt Cobain Album Tracklisting Featuring “Letters To Frances”

Alternative Nation has tracked down the tracklisting for Kurt Cobain’s new solo album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings, set for release on November 13th.

1. The Yodel Song
2. Been A Son
3. The Happy Guitar
4. Clean Up Before She Comes
5. Reverb Experiment
6. You Can’t Change Me/Burn My Britches/Something In The Way
7. Scoff
8. Desire
9. And I Love Her
10. Sappy
11. Letters To Frances
12. Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle
13. She Only Lies

Below is the rumored artwork.

cobainhomerecordings

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 28, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Hailed as one of the most innovative and intimate documentaries of all time, experience Kurt Cobain like never before in the only fully authorized portrait of the famed music icon in KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK. Acclaimed filmmaker Brett Morgen expertly blends Cobain’s personal archive of art, music, never-before-seen movies, animation and revelatory interviews from his family and closest friends. Wildly creative and highly praised, the documentary follows Kurt from his earliest years in this visceral and detailed cinematic insight of an artist struggling to come to terms and make sense of his place in the world. KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK, will be released by Universal Music Enterprises in multiple formats, including the Super Deluxe Edition as well as in Blu-ray, DVD and digital video formats. The soundtrack album, KURT COBAIN – MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS will also be released on CD and digitally on November 13, 2015. A 2LP vinyl edition of KURT COBAIN – MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS will follow on December 4, 2015.  In addition, a 7-inch Single featuring “And I Love Her” and “Sappy (Early Demo)” is also scheduled for release on November 20th.

KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK SUPER DELUXE EDITION and KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS both include the highly anticipated soundtrack, an aural complement to the documentary in both concept and experience. Comprised from various early and raw cassette recordings made by Kurt alone, the soundtrack allows a rare, unfiltered glimpse into Cobain’s creative progression from early song snippets and short demos to musical experiments and ultimately, pieces of songs or lyrics that eventually appeared on later Nirvana albums.

KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK SUPER DELUXE EDITION will include the 2 hour plus, full-length feature film and 48 minutes of bonus interviews on Blu-ray and DVD, a 31 track deluxe soundtrack on CD and cassette, a 160-page hardbound book with extended interviews and images from the Cobain archive, a puzzle with a collectable storage container, movie poster, postcards and bookmark. The 31 track deluxe soundtrack CD is exclusively available in the Super Deluxe Edition and showcases tracks from the documentary including spoken word, demos and full songs.

KURT COBAIN – MONTAGE OF HECK: THE HOME RECORDINGS soundtrack will be released in two stand-alone physical formats: a 31 track deluxe album available on 2LP vinyl and a standard edition 13 track CD.  The standard soundtrack focuses on the music discovered on Cobain’s personal cassettes. The soundtrack will also be available in standard and deluxe digital editions.

The documentary, KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK, is an authentic and unflinching look into Kurt’s life, art and mind through his own unique lens.  Following Kurt from his earliest years in Aberdeen, WA, through the height of his fame, the film creates an immersive cinematic insight into an artist who craved the spotlight even as he rejected the trappings of fame. Brett Morgen who wrote, directed and produced the documentary began working on it in 2007 when Cobain’s family approached him with the idea and offered him unrestricted access to all of Cobain’s personal and family archives. The documentary features Cobain and Courtney Love’s only daughter, Frances Bean Cobain, as a co-executive producer on the film and includes footage from various Nirvana performances as well as unreleased home movies, recordings, artwork, photography, journals, demos, and songbooks.

The title, KURT COBAIN: MONTAGE OF HECK, takes its name from a musical collage that was created by Cobain with a 4-track cassette recorder in 1988, of which there are two versions; one is about thirty-six minutes long and the other about eight-minutes long. Several of the film’s scenes were animated by Stefan Nadelman and Hisko Hulsing. The film was co-produced by HBO Documentary Films and Universal Pictures International Entertainment Content Group.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, also internationally billed as Cobain: Montage of Heck, had its world premiere at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. It was released in theaters across the globe by Universal Pictures and premiered on television in the United States in May, following a limited theatrical run. Following its initial global success, ABRAMORAMA re-launched Brett Morgen’s critically acclaimed documentary, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck in select theaters across the country on August 7th.

Alternative Nation Review Of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck

above: Kurt Cobain with daughter Frances Bean.

On Thursday, I was lucky enough to catch a screening of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck at Seattle’s Egyptian Theatre, just a block from Linda’s Tavern, where Cobain was last seen alive. The film, which will premiere on HBO on May 4, is directed by Brett Morgen, who was granted access to a private archive of Cobain’s belongings by his widow Courtney Love in 2007. The previously unreleased material that Morgen found – revealed in an untouched storage unit of Love’s – makes up much of the film’s content. Montage of Heck is appropriately named: while it references a mixtape Cobain made as a teenager, it also describes the constant stream of videos, drawings, and recordings that drive the film.

Montage is set apart from other Cobain documentaries by its deeply personal experience, in contrast to more historical, musical, or biographical perspectives. The presence of Cobain’s often-intimate audio and visual art, as well as the sparse, family-oriented use of interviews, aids this personal touch. With vivid quality, we’re introduced to the various periods of Kurt’s life through family videos, acoustic or vocal recordings, diary entries, and much more. It’s a complete immersion into Cobain’s art and worldview, or as executive producer Frances Bean Cobain put it to Rolling Stone, “it’s the closest thing to having Kurt tell his own story in his own words — by his own aesthetic, his own perception of the world.”

It’s also clearly a Kurt-centric, rather than Nirvana-centric, documentary. The freedom Morgen has with Nirvana’s discography is noticeable, and tweaked versions of “All Apologies” and “Something in the Way” define some great scenes detailing Kurt’s childhood. The band’s rise to fame is represented by lively and immersive concert and behind-the-scenes footage, but it’s only one piece of the puzzle for Montage, and not the priority or focus. Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic is introduced by a title card as “Kurt’s Friend” rather than as his bandmate, and Krist’s interview is oriented more towards Kurt’s personality and psychology than his musical development. Additionally, an interview with Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl didn’t make it into the film in time for the Sundance Festival. For director Brett Morgen, this positioning of Nirvana was intentional. “This isn’t a film where I wanted to go interview everyone who played with Nirvana, nor is it a film where I wanted to interview any more than the base minimum of what I had to do, so it was almost like primal,” he told Consequence of Sound. “Like the mom, the dad, the sister, the first love, the wife, the best friend.”

The interviews that Morgen did include in the documentary, however, are certainly revealing. Courtney Love admits that she did heroin while pregnant with Frances Bean, although she and Cobain aggressively denied the notion in 1992 after a damning article was published about them in Vanity Fair. One of Kurt’s diary entries is also shown on screen, with Kurt noting his ten experiences with heroin between 1987 and 1990. Tracy Marander, Cobain’s first serious girlfriend, says that he never told her about doing heroin and that she never saw any evidence of it. Kurt’s mom Wendy O’Connor shares an emotional story about noticing her son’s weight loss and sores and confronting him about his heroin usage. O’Connor says that when she asked him about using needles to inject heroin, Kurt was too emotional and couldn’t respond.

Kurt’s father Don Cobain is interviewed for the first time about his son, alongside Kurt’s stepmom Jenny. They recall Kurt’s attitude and resentment towards them as well as the difficulties they had with Kurt after he was kicked out of his mom Wendy’s house. Meanwhile, with the help of surpisingly decent animation sequences as well as never-before-seen family videos, Kurt’s childhood is vividly reconstructed. Morgen constructs a nostalgic narrative in which the idyllic, hyperactive childhood of Cobain and the idealistic era of the 1960s were shattered by Don and Wendy’s divorce, resulting in Kurt’s social withdrawal. There might be some understandable mix of nostalgia and revisionism when Wendy O’Connor describes the picturesque nature of Aberdeen, WA, Cobain’s small hometown that was hit hard by the decline of the timber industry in the area in the 1970s and 1980s. Still, his perspective of social alienation, family rejection, and affinity for punk rock is made apparent and personal.

Beginning with the turbulence of his post-divorce childhood, Morgen draws out several incidents in Cobain’s life that reveal recurring elements of shame, and subsequent social withdrawal and depression, or rebellion and rage. One revealing story – told by Cobain in a previously unheard recording and put to life with animation – describes his awkward first sexual experience with a girl he describes as “not retarded” but “slow and illiterate.” After her father revealed the secret to their high school, Cobain felt so embarrassed that he got high and drunk and laid down on train tracks, waiting to be killed. The next train that came happened to be one track over, and Cobain was spared. It’s clear that Morgen wants the story to illustrate some common feelings of shame and its link with suicidality in Cobain’s life.

This might irritate some Cobain conspiracy types, who would argue that Montage of Heck is the product of a Courtney Love agenda. Love played no part in the artistic direction of the film, whereas Frances Bean, who loved the film, served as the executive producer. According to The Stranger, a woman at the Seattle director Q&A session Wednesday night “shouted her displeasure that the documentary was all ‘from Courtney [Love]’s point of view.’ As Morgen began to defend himself, the woman said she knew both Kurt and Courtney, and reiterated her point.”

Frances Courtney Brett Morgen
Frances Bean Cobain and Courtney Love with director Brett Morgen at the Sundance Film Festival.

Towards the end of the film, as Courtney is discussing Kurt’s hypersensitivity, she says that she never cheated on Kurt, but that the one time she thought about it and had the chance to do it, he could sense what she was up to. She then implies that this led to Cobain’s apparent suicide attempt in Rome in March of 1994. It’s another interesting and honest admission from Love and a revealing glimpse into Cobain’s last days. Cobain’s suicide is only addressed by a title sequence at the end of the film that states that he took his life one month after the Rome attempt at age 27.

Still, it’s clear from watching the film that Morgen’s initiative, rather than the family members’ agenda, are driving the film. A scene that Wendy O’Connor asked not to be included in the film was actually included in the final cut by Morgen. It’s difficult to watch: Cobain is clearly high on heroin while playing with Frances during her first haircut.

Although I missed the Q&A with director Morgen later that night, the Egyptian’s theater setting was a great way to experience the Montage of Heck. Never-before-seen footage, including extensive home videos from Kurt and Courtney’s time living in Los Angeles in 1992, is really valuable throughout. It humanizes Cobain like no other work has and I think many will get a fuller, although not any less confusing, understanding of Cobain’s life. Like executive producer Frances Bean, who labeled the project “emotional journalism” and wanted to avoid the “mythology” and “romanticism” of her father, Morgen produces the most intimate documentary about Cobain yet. With this goal in mind, as well as unprecedented access to Cobain’s personal art, notebooks, and tapes, Morgen produces a film richer in detail and more honest to its character than any previous Cobain doc.

Montage of Heck will premiere on HBO on May 4. You can check out the film’s limited theatrical screenings at HBO.