Tag Archives: horror

Interview: Necrophagia’s Killjoy Talks Next Album And Filmmaking Plans

On January 9th, Venom offshoot Venom Inc and death metal pioneers Necrophagia played New York City’s famous venue Webster Hall as part of their first US circuit. For the uninitiated, Venom Inc is a new band that features ex-Venom members Mantas on guitar, Abaddon on drums, and Demolation Man on vocals, making this band a reunion of Venom’s 1988 to 1992 line up.

After the local openers, Necrophagia hit the stage. Their set was mostly focused on later material, as no songs from before 1998 were played. The band performed several fan favorites, such as “Embalmed Yet I Breathe” and “Blood Freak”, all while vocalist Killjoy practiced his horror theatrics. The band ended their set with their most well known song, “Cannibal Holocaust”, based on the horror classic of the same name.

After Necrophagia’s killer performance, it was time for Venom Inc. Audiences were curious due to the fact that though this version of Venom does not include classic vocalist Cronos, they still have two of the original three members. The band started their set with the title track from the 1988 Venom album Prime Evil. This was the only song they played from the line up they were a throwback to; from that point on the set list was mostly songs from the first two albums, Welcome to Hell and Black Metal. This included many classics such as “Black Metal”, “1,000 Days in Sodom”, “Countess Bathory”, “Don’t Burn the Witch” and “Schizo”. They also played some of the non-album singles from that era such as “Warhead” and “Bloodlust”. The band had good energy and looked like they were having a lot of fun. All and all the show was loved by the crowd who were sad about returning to reality afterwards.

I was given the opportunity to interview Necrophagia vocalist Killjoy. We had a pretty natural feeling conversation that revealed his plans for the next Necrophagia album as well as films he plans on making.

So how is the tour going so far?

It’s going great, a lot better than I expected. I’m getting drunk every night with Abbadon.

How did a bill like this happen?

Venom Inc personally wanted us for this tour. They contacted our manage,r who hooked us up with their booking agent. If it wasn’t for this tour we wouldn’t be touring at all instead I would have used the time to work on the next album.

Can you tell us a little bit about this next album?

The album will be a little bit more aggressive than our other stuff. It will just be a straight forward record, no interludes and nothing out of the ordinary and no random non-metal songs like “Sadako’s Curse”. It will just be a full on metal album that is more aggressive and maybe a little faster.

Speaking of “Sadako’s Curse”, what inspires you to write those non-metal songs?

I think it’s because I quit so many different side projects, and without taking away from what Necrophagia do, I think we were never a death metal band. I just keep my mind open. I’m a fan of Death In June, The Smiths, Elvis, Combichrist, and a lot more stuff that’s far from the metal genre. I try to make these influences work without going too left field.

That would explain why you guys sound nothing like other death metal bands yet you are credited as one of the first .

Early on, there was no terminology for it. I understand we had bands like Death and Possessed, but we didn’t really know what we were doing. We were just trying to make music that was as heavy, sick and different as possible. Everyone started going in that direction once we did Season of the Dead in ’87. To me that album is not a death metal record, people always tell us that we helped start death metal and I don’t care. I don’t claim to have started anything and neither did Chuck of Death. He was a very good friend of mine. We both just loved horror films and love bands like Hellhammer and Venom and let it influence our work.

People love labeling everything. Nowadays it’s gotten really out of hand. I’ve seen people say that punk and punk rock are different genres.

That is weird. I know you have hardcore punk and crust and grindcore and all that, but I don’t get how you can have punk that’s not rock. To me we are just a metal band. I don’t like just one certain tag.

If you were to bring back one of your aformentioned old side projects which would it be?

I’d bring back Enoch, because I love making music that is horrific and sometimes making heavy music isn’t always horrific sounding. To me, that project was more of a challenge… people got to hear a soundtrack to a movie that they never heard of ’cause it only exists in my head.

Would you ever do a voice over for a horror film? Made voice a demon?

If I like the script yes, I’d even do it for a cartoon if I liked the idea. It’s something I’ve thought about actually. Ultimately, I want to direct movies. I have three different scripts written so when I finally call it a day with this band, that is what I will do.

Can you tell us about these scripts?

I rather not, only because the titles of these alone give what they are about. I can tell you they are straight through and through horror films. Two of them are very occult based, while one is going to be the most extreme and original thing anyone has seen… and I stress original, which is why I don’t want to say what its about cause its never been done.

If you were to get any director, dead or alive, to direct these scripts who would it be?

It would be easy to say Fulci though I don’t know if his style would fit even though hes a huge influence on me. I’d say Mario Bava. I feel my stuff would be more up his alley.

Top 10 Japanese Horror Films That Aren’t About Ghost Or Kaiju

Japanese horror films or J-horror have always been a force to be reckoned with. The country has produced some of the scariest, weirdest and most extreme films the genre has known. In Western pop culture, people normally think of giant monsters (aka Kaiju) or ghost children when it comes to horror flicks from Japan, though the country has produced a diverse wealth of them spanning multiple subgenres. Here, in no order, are ten of the country’s best horror films that feature neither of those things.

Suicide Club (2002)

During the late 90’s to mid 2000’s Japan was making many controversial horror films, one of the most notable being Suicide Club. The film is about police investigating a wave of unconnected suicides and is most notorious for a scene where schools girls happily jump in front of a train. Despite having such a dark subject matter, the film has plenty of humor. Recommended for fans of films that are disturbing and funny at the same time.

Versus (2000)

Versus is a horror, comedy, martial arts, gunplay fusion directed by the now acclaimed Ryuhei Kitamura. Set in a place known as The Forrest of Resurrection, a gang of Yakuzas fights hordes of zombies while trying to stop their leader from opening a portal to hell. With good laughs, gore and fight choreography, the film has stuff to please just about any kind of geek. In 2004 an extended edition called Ultimate Versus was released. This is the best version to see.

Wicked City (1987)

In the 1980’s anime was known for being very violent and this horror anime is a prime example of that. Set near the dawn of the year 2000, a human agent named Taki and a female demon named Makie take on a group of demons called The Radicals. They must also protect a 200-year-old man named Giuesspi who is the only one who can bring peace to the human and demon worlds. The film mixes frightening visuals with high-octane action and explicit gore and nudity and never feels slow for a minute, but at the same time is able to tell a good story.

Kuroneko (1968)

During a civil war, two women are raped and murdered by samurai. After the war, many samurai start mysteriously dying. A young hero is then called in from the government who are convinced it’s the work of a demon. Though the film’s plot does involve ghosts, the film is not structured like a ghost movie and is different in style than what Japan’s horror scene would be known for.  The black and white look mixed with its feudal setting gives the film great atmosphere. The acting is also very good and you really feel for the characters, something that is lost in a lot of horror.

Tokyo: The Last Megalopolis (1988)

Yet another genre blender, this film mixes horror with science fiction and historical fantasy. The plot is about a demonic reincarnation of an old Japaneses emperor on a mission to destroy all of Toyko. The film was a major part of the occult crazes that swept Japan from the late 80’s-early 90’s. Though very slow at times, this film is full of atmosphere and a story that just draws you in and shocks you at when it wants to. The emperor from this film was the inspiration for M. Bison from the game series Street Fighter.

Onibaba (1964)

From Kaneto Shindo, director of Kuroneko, comes another feudal era horror film. Two women have a hobby that involves killing soldiers and stealing their belongings. The women then meet a mysterious man who wears a bizarre mask. Like Kuronekothe film’s setting and lack of color give it good atmosphere. The free-jazz and tribal score also help give the film a bit of a bizarre tone. If Akira Kurosawa made a horror film, it would be Onibaba.

Tetsuo:The Iron Man (1989)

Shinya Tsukamoto is known for directing some of Japan’s craziest films and Tetsuo is no exception. The film is about a businessman who accidentally kills a man who has a fetish for sticking scrap metal in his body. The businessman then starts sprouting metal appendages such as drills out of random parts of his body (not making this up). Shot in black and white and on a low budget this film feels like Eraserhead on crack.  The industrial score is also very good and fits the film perfectly. The film would get two sequels, Tetsuo II: The Body Hammer and Tetsuo: Bullet Man.

Vampire Hunter D (1985)

Based on the first of the Vampire Hunter D novels, this film is horror anime at it’s finest. In the year 12,090 AD, a young woman named Doris hires a half-vampire half human named D to protect her from a powerful vampire lord who has bitten her and wants to make her his new bride. Vampire Hunter D is mostly known as the film that inspired the game series Castlevania. Some of the similarities include Doris using a whip as her main weapon and D resembling recurring Castlevania character Alucard. In 2000, the film would receive a sequel titled Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust, based on the third book in the series.

Ichi The Killer (2001) 

Considered to be one of the most disturbing films of all time. The film is directed by famed Japanese director Takashi Miike and is based off the manga of the same name. The film is about a Yakuza named Kakihara who gets turned on when he feels pain. While torturing a rival Yakuza, he learns of an assassin named Ichi who is a great martial artist who gets turned on when he inflicts pain (not making this up) . The film was banned in many countries due to its explicit violence. Though it is full of shock value, the film doesn’t fail in the story and character departments. The film has a prequel called 1-Ichi, which is done in the style of an anime.

Audition (1999)

Also from Takashi Miike, Audition is one of the most well-known and greatest J-horror films out there. A father who lost his wife looks for a new girlfriend. The method he uses is a false movie audition held by his friend, who is a filmmaker. Eventually, he finds the girl he wants. The two relate real well though, though the film hints that this girl is not right in the head, leading to an unforgettable climax. The film is known for its roller coaster-like story structure. Most of it is like a romantic drama with hints of horror; you know things are going to get bad, but you don’t know when. The film is very disturbing and creepy without the use of much onscreen gore.

Top 13 Non Romero Zombie Films

October is around again, the time of year where everyone binges on horror films. To celebrate his one year anniversary on the site, Anthony has decided to bring the horror lists back from the dead. While last year he talked about slashers, this time he goes into the zombie sub-genre… just none of these zombie films are directed by horror master George A Romero, pioneer of the genre renowned for his … of the Living Dead films.


Tombs of the Blind Dead (1971)

We start the list off with a serving from Spain. The film is about the Knights Templar coming back from the dead. They are blind due to having their eyes pecked out when they were hung on the gallows, but they are still pretty deadly. The film contains the great atmosphere and visuals that Spanish horror is known for and it helped kick start a boom of films from that country. The film would later get three sequels,none of which would connect story wise.

28 Days Later (2002)

Directed by acclaimed director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting,Slumdog Millionaire) this film is credited for bringing the zombie genre back from the dead! A man wakes up from a 28 day coma to a word over run by people infected by a rage virus. The film put a new spin on the genre by using a virus instead of the undead making these zombies faster and more violent. The score is also very well done something rare for scores done during this time period. The sequel 28 Weeks Later is also pretty good.

City of the Living Dead (1980)

Italian director Lucio Fulci was made many great films including some in the zombie sub genre. City of the Living Dead is one of those greats. The film is about a reporter and a psychic race to close the gates of hell after a clergyman’s suicide caused them to open. While these gates are open all kinds of strange and evil things happen as well as you know zombies! The film has good dark atmosphere as well as some really brutal deaths that you will not be able to unsee!

Deadgirl (2008)

From writer Trent Haaga, known for his Troma films Citizen Toxie and Terror Firmer, comes a different kind of film. The film is about two teens that skip school to go to an abandoned mental hospital where they find a tied girl who is of the undead. The boys do what any person would do if they saw a zombie girl… make her their sex slave (not making this up). Thing is those shackles won’t hold forever! The film is very disturbing and caused controversy when it came out though it was also praised for being smarter than most teen horrors.


Brain Dead (1992)

Known as Dead Alive in the states, this New Zealand horror-comedy is one of Peter Jackson’s earliest films. The film is about a man whose mother is bitten by a when visiting a zoo. The woman becomes a zombie and this slowly starts an outbreak. Considered the goriest film of all time at its releases, the film is a fusion of Monty Python humor and splatter gore. Anything can possibly happen in this film.

White Zombie (1932)

This early Bela Lugosi film is considered to be the very first zombie film. In this film a man goes to a witch doctor to try to find a lure the woman he loves away from her fiance. Instead the witch doctor turns her into a zombie and then turns the man into one soon. The finance of the woman then travels to Haiti to find his lost lover after he finds out she is in fact not dead. Instead of the living dead, this film is about people under the control of voodoo. The film would eventually get a sequel called Revolt of the Zombies.

Dellamorte Dellamore (1994)

Known as Cemetery Man in the states this Italian film is a very distinct one. This genre blender of horror, black comedy and romance tells the story of a young cemetery caretaker who battles undead all awhile looking for love. With great jokes, beautiful atmosphere and visuals and very Gothic feel, this flick is a must watch for all zombie lovers.

Shaun of the Dead (2004)

Speaking of horror, romance and comedy fusions, Shaun of the Dead is the debut film by acclaimed director Edgar Wright. Shaun is just a man with your typical family problems… he just tries fixing them while a zombie apocalypse is going on! Though this film is normally thought of as a straight comedy, plenty of horror elements still exist.

Zombi 2 (1979)

Though films tied to Romero’s dead series are excluded from this list, Zombi 2 gets a pass for being an unofficial sequel to Dawn of the Dead. Fucli’s first attempt at a zombie film, this film is very gory and has several iconic scenes including one where a zombie fights a shark.

Carnival of Souls (1962)

A woman named Mary is riding around in a car with some friends. The car falls of a bridge and all of them die except Mary. She then gets a job as an organist for a church. She then starts seeing weird and disturbing images including zombies that seem to be coming for her. Layered with atmosphere; Carnival of Souls influenced many and is still shown at festivals to this day.

Re-Animator (1985)

Adaptations of H.P Lovecraft’s stories tend to normally be bad, but Re-Animator is one of the few diamonds in that rough. Herbert West is a new student at a medical school who is trying to find a way to bring the dead back to life. It works but not in the way he’s planned! While really really gory, this film also has a good sense of humor and characters. The film would get two sequels, Bride of the Re-Animator and Beyond Re-Animator.

The Beyond (1981)

A woman inherits an old hotel and not too long after many bizarre and horrid events happen (including zombies of course). She later learns that this place was built on one of the seven layers of Hell. A horror masterpiece and Fulci’s best work by far, The Beyond is a must watch for anyone into horror. Mixing splatter gore with weird, artsy horror, this film unites both cinema snobs and exploitation lovers everywhere.

Return of the Living Dead (1985)

Directed by film legend Dan O’ Bannon, Return of the Living Dead is the most popular none Romero zombie film. In this horror comedy three men and a group of punks end up having to deal with a horde of the undead. These zombies crave brains instead of human flesh and can only be killed with fire or electricity. The soundtrack includes songs from punk classics such as The Cramps and The Damned. Loads of fun is to be had when watching time capsule of the 1980’s. The film would receive two theatrical sequels and two SYFY channel sequels.


Josh Homme, Mark Lanegan & Iggy Pop Are In A New Silent Film

Gutterdämmerung seems to be a portmanteau of the English “gutter” and the German “götterdämmerung” (or just an Anglicization of the word), which means roughly means “a collapse (as of a society or regime) marked by catastrophic violence and disorder.” The word is a German translation of the Old Norse ” Ragnarök” a prophetic concept in Norse mythology which foretells a large and all-consuming battle between deities which would to extravagent chaos and disarray, as dramatized in Richard Wagner’s opera series, also entitled “Götterdämmerung.” Enough background.

Importantly, there is a spooky awesome independent film in the works from the Belgian-Swedish visual artist Bjorn Tagemose, entitled “Gutterdämmerung.” A tribute to 1920’s Hollywood (the era’s horror genre to be specific), the tagline is the “loudest silent movie on Earth.” This may not be a complete exaggeration. The film will be “silent”, if you exclude the dark, heavy soundtrack that will be accommodate the film at all points. Instead of the ragtime piano or organs prevalent in old-timey film, the website says the soundtrack is performed by  “a live rock band of rock express the emotions and action whilst special effects from the film explode to life all around the audience.” Though exact artistic details of the soundtrack have not been released, several figures from alternative rock, metal and punk are starring in the film – which may give some hints to what the soundtrack will sound like. So far, the film’s cast has been announced as Queens of the Stone Age’s frontman Josh Homme (listed as Joshua Homme), Motorhead’s Lemmy, solo artist and ex-Screaming Trees frontman Mark Lanegen, famed Black Flag singer and inspiration speaker/comedian combo Henry Rollins, Eagles of Death Metal frontman Jesse Hughes, Slayer’s Tom Araya, solo artist Grace Jones and the one and only Iggy Pop.

The website is hosting a contest for tickets and merchandise to guess the two remaining co-stars. The film is expected to be released sometime in 2016. The film’s Facebook page lists the project as a “concert tour”…perhaps all the collaborating musicians will go on tour together to promote the project? We’ll have to see.

Watch a promotional trailer for the film below: