Tag Archives: chris cornell

Chris Cornell Talks Reaction To Kurt Cobain’s Death: ‘There’s No Silver Lining To This’

Chris Cornell discussed the November 2015 terrorist attack on Eagles of Death Metal’s show at the Bataclan in Paris on KISW’s Men’s Room yesterday, and how he had difficulty finding a way to talk about the show to his own live audience, especially having played the same venue a few years prior. Alternative Nation transcribed a couple of quotes.

“Normally when a horrible thing, a tragedy, you go out on stage, and you talk about it, and you try to say something. Either you are sort of flooded with emotion, or you’re pissed off, and you go out and yell and scream. That was a situation where I felt like, I don’t think I really want to bring this up now while there’s an audience sitting in seats the same way the audience was sitting in those seats watching Eagles of Death Metal. Innocent people just out trying to relax and see a rock show, and forget about the day for a minute. That’s all they were guilty of.”

He also discussed Kurt Cobain’s death.

“It’s something that happened I think when Kurt died. At the time, I think people considered me someone that was somewhat together (laughs). I don’t know why, they didn’t know me, so I was getting calls to participate in interviews where I think they kind of wanted to hear somebody say a positive thing. I remember saying, ‘There’s no silver lining to this. There’s nothing good to say about this.’ It’s a horrible thing.”

Chris Cornell & Eddie Vedder Record Beatles Covers For New Netflix Series

Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder covered The Beatles’ “Magical Mystery Tour” for the upcoming Netflix series Beat Bugs, and a clip of the cover is featured in the trailer below. Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell has covered “Drive My Car” for the series.

Los Angeles, Calif. 10 Feb. 2016 – Netflix, Grace: A Storytelling Company (Grace), Thunderbird and Beyond Screen Production announced today that the highly anticipated children’s series BEAT BUGS will come to Netflix this summer. BEAT BUGS features original characters and a world created by Josh Wakely, who will direct, write and produce the series, following a deal with Sony/ATV Music Publishing for worldwide rights to record covers of the Beatles song catalogue for this production. Australian Netflix members will be able to enjoy the series on Netflix soon after its premier on Seven Network.

BEAT BUGS incorporates songs from the Lennon/McCartney ‘Northern Songs’ catalogue, to tell uplifting and life-affirming stories filled with hope and melody. World-leading artists, animators and writers have come together to work on this extraordinary show. The Beat Bugs are charming, funny, adventurous, and have a knack for getting themselves into mischief and mayhem. Each of the five friends (Jay, Kumi, Crick, Buzz, and Walter) has a distinctive personality, and they display the charm and energy of five knockabout, lovable kids. They are best friends who band together to explore and learn in an overgrown suburban backyard, which to them is their entire universe.

The show will feature some of the most well-known Beatles songs woven into the narrative of each episode, with Eddie Vedder, P!nk, James Bay, Sia, The Shins, Of Monsters and Men, Chris Cornell, Regina Spektor, James Corden, and Birdy each recording their rendition of an iconic song. Further artists joining the project are expected to be announced in the coming months. Among the songs featured include Help!, All You Need Is Love, Come Together, Penny Lane, Yellow Submarine, Lucy In the Sky with Diamonds, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and Magical Mystery Tour.

“Personally I’m very grateful to be part of Josh’s vision,” said Eddie Vedder. “A tremendous show for kids that combines beautiful animation with great stories and obviously some of the best songs ever written.”

“It’s a rare occasion to be presented with a truly one-of-a-kind children’s show that is so perfectly suited to Netflix,” said Andy Yeatman, director of original kid’s content at Netflix. “Josh and his team have not only developed a compelling children’s show filled with life lessons, but they’ve built a show that will transcend generations and have parents and grandparents enjoying right alongside their little ones.”

Josh Wakely says: “Bringing BEAT BUGS to life on Netflix and having a platform to re-imagine this universally acclaimed music for families around the world is an exhilarating and rewarding experience. Our partners have been fantastic in making this concept a vivid reality, and this is a great example of the innovative and fresh storytelling at the heart of Grace’s ethos.”

This marks the first project from Wakely’s independent film and television production and development banner, Grace: A Storytelling Company (Grace) – which he co-owns with BEAT BUGS Executive Producer, Trevor Roy. In addition, award-winning film and TV production group Thunderbird has come on board as a co-production partner, alongside Beyond Screen Production. Atomic Cartoons, a Thunderbird-owned studio, is working on animation for the series. The series is represented worldwide by Beyond Distribution.

Interview: Joe Buck On How Eddie Vedder The Man Differs From The Performer

As we previewed with early Stone Temple Pilots collaborator Corey Hickok’s recent in-depth piece on Scott Weiland with Brett Buchanan, this is the first article for our ‘Deep Cuts’ section, which focused on longform musical journalism and commentary.

Last week you heard Joe Buck calling the NFC championship game on Fox. Come Wednesday, you will find Buck hosting Undeniable on DIRECTV’s Audience network. Then, once spring rolls around, Buck will be back at the ballpark as baseball kicks into high gear, eventually leading to working a double when the NFL starts back up again in the fall. What’s the trick to keeping focused while having to often switch gears? Music.

Alternative Nation recently had the opportunity to catch up with Buck to discuss many things Pearl Jam, how the power of music impacts his life, aids his preparation and enhances sports.

How important is music to you?

It’s what makes me concentrate. I equate different years and different events that I’ve done with what music was out or what’s on my radar at that moment. Specifically with regards to Pearl Jam, when Backspacer came out, it was around the time where I met Eddie. I was doing the World Series in 2009 between Philadelphia and New York. Just going back to listening to that album over and over and over, whether it was after a game late at night, in preparation before the game or even during the game.

We have this great audio guy named Joe Carpenter. If something is hot on both of our lists, he’ll play it out over the PA that goes into everyone’s headset; whether it’s camera operator, audio personnel or my headset in the both. It really calms me. It lets me know, as I’m about to get ready to do the game – which at the time feels like everybody is paying every seconds worth of attention to and it’s the biggest thing in the world, it reminds you that you are just part of a bigger picture going on in the United States and nobody really cares how you do or what you do. You just do your best and have fun.

So music holds a valuable spot in your preparation and how you go about your work?

Yes, definitely. I’m not a huge numbers guy. I’ll sit at my desk and put down every relevant statistic to the game I am about to do with music going on in the background. It’s not always the same music. It’s usually something that is soothing to me, like Chris Cornell’s latest album. It can be older stuff as well, that takes me back a little bit. I think when you do TV you kind of have the ability to separate different tracks in your head. I can concentrate on the numbers better and what I’m putting in, if I have something else going on. That’s why I text people during games and during breaks. It keeps my mind active. Music provides me with that opportunity during my preparation.

I love Cornell’s latest album as well and often have it accompany me in the same exact way.

His voice is just ridiculous. Even just the instrumental portion of the new album – what they’ve done with arrangements and how it just highlights what he can do vocally, it’s mind-blowing.

His voice is an instrument in itself.

It is, and it’s pretty damn unique. It’s the same for Eddie. I think in today’s pop world, a lot of people ending up sounding a lot alike. You can listen to some performers and say, “well is that X, Y or Z?” Then you hear Eddie’s voice or Chris’ voice, it’s so unique and the sound is so distinct that there’s no mistaking it for anybody else. It’s a great fingerprint.

Has music always been a big part of your life even going back to early memories growing up?

Yes, my mom was on Broadway and was a singer and a dancer. The way I was brought up, most other kids were probably listening to Boston, and I was too, but I was also subjected to the soundtracks of Oklahoma or Guys and Dolls around my house at the same time. So I have a wide range of music that has influenced me over the course of my life.

A lot of people tell me that about my dad, who did the Cardinals baseball games for so many years. They tell me how his voice was kind of a soundtrack to their lives growing up, being around St. Louis in the summer and hearing him while they’re mowing the grass or hearing him bouncing off the walls in their kitchen. That was usually the case for me too, but I was usually down at the ballpark. When I wasn’t at the park with him, I was really into music. I saw that as a kid; my parents having friends and family over, standing around singing, that’s really how I grew up.

Are you able to influence what songs are played on-air, into break or that are run over highlights? Or are those all outside deals?

There was a time, yeah. I could be wrong about this, but I’m 99.9% sure that it was Fox that got all of the television networks that cover sports into some trouble when we did a Super Bowl a few years ago and we played a track over highlights, like a pre-packaged piece during the Super Bowl. It was to Arcade Fire. Someone from their camp heard it and said, “Hey, we didn’t give authorization for Fox to use that.” A lawsuit followed and it made things really difficult to get cleared. To me, and I’ve talked to Vedder about this, that’s such a feather in their cap. Vedder is such a crazy sports fan and Pearl Jam actually did a deal with Fox a few years ago during the baseball postseason. They like it. Arcade Fire obviously did not or at least didn’t like that they didn’t know about it. The deal settled, but it made everybody gun-shy. For a while there at Fox, we were using basically a studio greatest hits album where notes are just off enough or it’s not done by the original artist, where it kind of sounds like the song that everybody is listening to right now, but it’s not it. That’s how they got away with it. It’s basically studio generic stuff. That was crushing to me. As a sports fan, and as somebody who takes pride in everything we put out over the air, to not have the ability to then pair it up with music that fits or can inspire or put an emotional accent to something, it just kills me.

We’ve kind of come out of those woods a little bit, more so doing specific deals. We did one with The Who years ago and I think Jack Black did the same with us. For sure Pearl Jam did which was great. Then you can play different cuts off a specific catalog that they’ll give you. It adds a lot to what we do, it’s as important as the voice that’s on there calling the play-by-play.

I remember we were doing a World Series game and Tim Wakefield, a knuckleball pitcher, was pitching. I’ve always been a huge XTC fan and the song “Knuckle Down” was one I told someone working in our truck to check out. Then one of our rolls out of the break was “Knuckle Down” by XTC with a little knuckleball dancing all over the place. It doesn’t always have to be literal but it can be. To me, it adds a lot of depth to what we do.

You mentioned the 2009 World Series. I’m a Yankee fan and after they won, Fox ran the highlights of the series with Pearl Jam’s “Amongst the Waves” playing as the backing music. It was amazing, couldn’t have been more perfect.

That’s the stuff, when we go off the air, I just think – wow, that was awesome. It’s like sports movies. Sports movies are some of the most powerful out there. They don’t always get the teams right and it doesn’t always look all that realistic, but you put certain scenes in The Natural up against anything that’s been directed and produced in film – as far as powerful moments and beautiful pictures, paired with music. In my mind, it’s right up there with the best when Roy Hobbs hits the ball up into the lights and it’s almost like fireworks coming down. Then the music hits and he’s rounding the bases in the dark. That’s as strong as it gets. It shows you the power of not just sports in those emotional moments that we all click into, but how they can be enhanced by the right piece of music.

Having a personal connection with Pearl Jam now, what’s it like for you being such a fan of the band? Is it hard to separate the band and music you’ve loved for so long from the relationship of being friends?

It’s really just Eddie. I have mutual friends with Stone, but I don’t know him at all. It’s surreal to me. I know Eddie and then you hear Eddie Vedder as the frontman of Pearl Jam, and they are like two different people to me. I’ll find myself texting with him and I almost have to remind myself who I’m texting with. It’s funny; my wife will roll her eyes at me and say, “oh let me guess, Eddie?” But we’ll go back and forth because he’s a legitimate sports fan. That’s how we got to know each other. Pearl Jam came into St. Louis in 2010 and in one of their encores he dedicated “Alive” to me. He said something along the lines of, “I don’t know if you’re still in here, but this one’s for you Joe Buck.” I didn’t know him really. He just knew through this company that I had gotten seats through people in his group and he was a sports fan so he threw that out there. I had met him a year or so before, we had just a brief encounter and we ended talking mostly about our daughters. He’s basically my age. I find myself texting more about kids and family. He’ll text me during the month of October and I’ll be texting with him during games and will send him a little video of what’s going on in our booth and he’ll send me a video of what’s going on backstage or even onstage. It’s just crazy. But he’s just genuinely the nicest guy. I had him in the booth for last year’s NFC championship game in Seattle. He flew in from Hawaii to go to it. I took him down onto the field, which was crazy scene. People were just going nuts. He met Pete Carroll before kickoff and then came up in the booth and stayed in the back the whole time. He was sending me notes of different things he observed to get into the broadcast. What made me feel great though was how he treated the spotter in the booth, the makeup person or anyone that came in. He could not have been sweeter. He never comes off as bothered and that’s a unique trait – to be as recognizable and be as polite as he is. I really think Hawaii has really been that refuge for him where he can go and hideout. I’ll text him and he’ll tell me he’s going out for evening surf. I think he really gets to shut down when he’s there. Consequently, when he comes back into the real world, he’s kind of languid and tranquil. Everything you’d hope he would be and probably more. I’m awe, believe me. I’m awe of his talent and of his brain. Some of his texts should be set to music, they’re so deep and well thought out. He’s just a brilliant writer and creative person. You realize why the guy is who he is and why that band is as great as it is, because their front-guy is just kind of on a different level. I’m much more in awe of anything he does that when I do. What he likes about my world is that he is a sincere sports fan, not just something that would look good. He’s got trunks with the Cubs stickers on them. He sent me pictures from inside the Cubs clubhouse and talking with Joe Maddon. He’s like a little kid when it comes to that so it’s neat to be around that too.

The pairing of the two worlds; sports and music, always intrigues me. The mutual admiration and respect is fascinating.

It’s true. I’ve talked with friends of mine about trying to produce a show like that – trying to have these two worlds marry up for a day. It was done on IFC with the show Iconoclasts. Michael Stipe and Mario Batalli in particular. They spend a day in one guys world and then the next day in the others and you can just see them in awe of what the other person does. So, it’s cool to give Eddie that kind of peak behind the curtain of what we do in a NFC championship game and then to go down into his dressing room after that 2010 show, and talk about everything but music was great.

With your new show Undeniable, to me, it comes across as an E:60 meets, CenterStage, meets a Howard Stern interview. Is that a fair assessment?

I think so. Anytime you mention Stern, that’s the ultimate. I would even throw James Lipton in there from Inside the Actors Studio. It’s one thing to ask somebody to sit down and talk about the team, talk about the next game or talk about a cover two defense. It’s another to say – let’s sit down and talk about the beginnings of your life, how you were shaped, where you didn’t meet expectations, where you failed and how you picked yourself back up and succeeded after that. I think that’s where it struck a chord with people, meaning the interview guests. I never expected to have the kind of cooperation that we ended up having. To sit there for two and half hours with Jeter, Gretzky or Michael Phelps and talk about suicide, how low he got and what it was like going to rehab, you realize these people really do want to talk. They want to talk more than just a Sunday conversation on ESPN and more than just five minutes. These are people more than they are sports stars. That’s really what the objective was. Vince Vaughn, Peter Billingsly and I are the producers on it with DIRECTV. That’s what we determined we would go after on this when we met two and half years ago and it’s what we’ve achieved to some degree with the show. For the athlete, it’s almost like therapy and they get up really happy that they were there. The crowd and the actual venue where we do it, certainly the host, is really glad that they were there.

Do you film in New York?

We filmed the first thirteen episodes in Manhattan Beach at Manhattan Beach Studios. I had to work that in and around my calendar. My wife and I rented a place out there. Then we are doing seven more around the Super Bowl in San Francisco. That will be an even 20 for year one and then we’ll see where we go for year two. It’s to a point now where hopefully the show sells itself. It’s one thing to get Derek Jeter and think – here’s what we hope to do. It’s another to talk to Jeter, show it, put it on the air and have other sports stars in that same echelon see it and think it would be something fun to do.

You’ve had Kelly Slater too. I know he’s a big Pearl Jam fan.

Yeah. He was great. He’s another guy who came from nothing. He really worked hard and found his own way. A part of that takes a turn like Phelps episode, and you realize how low he got. He’s a lot like Eddie Vedder. He’s just on a different level. He’s always developing, he’s always thinking and he’s a very creative person; whether it’s creating on a wave or a clothing line or just contemplating life. He’s a unique dude.

In the Michael Phelps episode, there’s a small part where he says – “I don’t know if I’m somebody different because of what I’ve done? This is the real Michael Phelps.” I feel like that really encapsulates what the show is all about.

Exactly. It’s perception too. People even have a perception of me where they think they know me. Everybody wants to put somebody in a box. They hear me call touchdown or homeruns and know that I’m somebodies kid too and think I got into the business because of my dad. Now they got me pegged. We see Derek Jeter’s success or Michael Phelps getting gold medals around his neck and we think – this guy believes he’s better than everybody else. But then you realize, he is a flawed human being that has been scared to death. It’s kind of self-help series. That’s what Vince Vaughn wants to sell it as. It doesn’t matter what you do in life, you can take a lesson out of this and apply it to what you do or where you’ve been or what you hope to become. That’s been the most satisfying part of it. It’s not just talking about when you hit the double into right center field its more about what the athlete was feeling before the World Series. Did you want the ball hit to you? It doesn’t matter if you are in an office building or fixing a pipe, do you want the pressure on you?

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Watch Videos From Chris Cornell’s First Show Of 2016

Last Thursday, Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell performed his first show of 2016, a private concert at The Roxy in Los Angeles. See the setlist, video clips, and photos below!

Setlist:

Chris Cornell from Soundgarden @theroxy amazing show tonight!!!

A video posted by Jacquelyn Zwick (@jacquelynzwick) on

#chriscornell #theroxy #sogood

A video posted by David Crvelin (@dcrvelin23) on

Might ah been creeping a lil' bit on the golden voice of God @chriscornellofficial last night Mahaloz @markkley

A video posted by ßuster ßrown* (@itsbusterbrown) on

#chriscornell dropping some #bobdylan #epic

A video posted by Jonathan Rosenbloom (@jrosey16) on

Chris Cornell from Soundgarden @theroxy amazing show tonight!!!

A video posted by Jacquelyn Zwick (@jacquelynzwick) on

Chris Cornell #music #hollywood #california #sassoonstyle #kriyayoga #peace #love

A video posted by Rose Garcia (@stylecolorose) on

Set 1: Chris Cornell at the Roxy

A photo posted by Michael Cavallaro (@mjcavallaro) on

#chriscornell #theroxy

A photo posted by David Crvelin (@dcrvelin23) on

Chris Cornell discussed David Bowie in a recent Rolling Stone piece. Read an excerpt below:

“I’ve played his song ‘Lady Stardust,’ from Ziggy Stardust, live in my solo shows over the years because I always loved it on the album, and, for some reason, it reminds me of Andy Wood. I wanted to play it in tribute to him, but then I ended up writing a bunch of songs for Temple of the Dog and those took precedence. When Soundgarden split up in ’98, I came across that song, and I remember sitting in my car in the driveway listening to it, and there’s that lyric, ‘He was all right, the band was all together,’ and it’s so hopeful. My band had just broken up. And it really gutted me. So that was when I started doing it. I haven’t played it more than a couple times live, but it’s like the one song of his that I’ve always been drawn to. I just really love it.

When I woke up yesterday, I was already thinking about David Bowie. I was checking out his new record a couple of days ago; I was reading about it, I’d listened to a few songs. Then I saw the news. Hearing he’d died was just a really sad thing. I was very happy with Blackstar. I was really happy with his last album, The Next Day, too. Both albums show an ongoing evolution. I need people like David Bowie, people who are always moving on and not in a frustrating or slovenly way. It encourages me because I want to be able to write music and create albums until I drop dead.”

Listen To Chris Cornell’s New Song “Til The Sun Comes Back Around”

Chris Cornell has released a new song called “Til the Sun Comes Back Around” for the film 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi is a 2016 American biographical action war thriller film directed and co-produced by Michael Bay and written by Chuck Hogan, based on the 2014 book 13 Hours by Mitchell Zuckoff. It is based on the story of the six members of a security team who fought to defend the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, after a terrorist attack on September 11, 2012.

The film stars James Badge Dale, John Krasinski, Max Martini, Toby Stephens, Pablo Schreiber, David Denman, Dominic Fumusa, and Freddie Stroma. Filming began on April 27, 2015 in Malta. The film was released today by Paramount Pictures.

Chris Cornell Says David Bowie Song Reminds Him Of Andy Wood & Soundgarden’s Break Up

Chris Cornell discussed David Bowie in a new Rolling Stone piece.  Read an excerpt below:

“I’ve played his song ‘Lady Stardust,’ from Ziggy Stardust, live in my solo shows over the years because I always loved it on the album, and, for some reason, it reminds me of Andy Wood. I wanted to play it in tribute to him, but then I ended up writing a bunch of songs for Temple of the Dog and those took precedence. When Soundgarden split up in ’98, I came across that song, and I remember sitting in my car in the driveway listening to it, and there’s that lyric, ‘He was all right, the band was all together,’ and it’s so hopeful. My band had just broken up. And it really gutted me. So that was when I started doing it. I haven’t played it more than a couple times live, but it’s like the one song of his that I’ve always been drawn to. I just really love it.

When I woke up yesterday, I was already thinking about David Bowie. I was checking out his new record a couple of days ago; I was reading about it, I’d listened to a few songs. Then I saw the news. Hearing he’d died was just a really sad thing. I was very happy with Blackstar. I was really happy with his last album, The Next Day, too. Both albums show an ongoing evolution. I need people like David Bowie, people who are always moving on and not in a frustrating or slovenly way. It encourages me because I want to be able to write music and create albums until I drop dead.”

Top 10 Alternative Rock David Bowie Covers

David Bowie was easily one of the most influential musicians of all time. Every era of music that has followed the 60’s/70’s classic rock era has featured artists who were influenced by Bowie. In the 80’s you had bands like The Smiths, whose frontman Morrissey definitely carried on Bowie’s sense of style and lyrical phrasing. In the 90’s, artists like late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland cited Bowie as one of their top musical influences, with Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor even reworking “I’m Afraid Of Americans” to help Bowie have his biggest hit in years.

The 2000’s had bands like The Killers who helped revive Bowie’s dark glam rock sound, with Bowie giving one of his final live performances with Arcade Fire. In this article, we are focusing on the greatest Bowie covers performed by 90’s alternative rock artists. Rest in peace David.

10. Red Hot Chili Peppers – “Suffragette City”

9. Scott Weiland – “The Jean Genie”

8. Alice In Chains – “Suffragette City”

7. The Smashing Pumpkins – “Space Oddity”

6. Chris Cornell – “Lady Stardust”

5. Scott Weiland – “Ashes to Ashes”

4. A Perfect Circle – “Ashes to Ashes”

3. The Wallflowers – “Heroes”

2. Nirvana – “The Man Who Sold The World”

1. Stone Temple Pilots – “Andy Warhol”

Pearl Jam & Chris Cornell Honor David Bowie

Pearl Jam members Mike McCready and Jeff Ament, along with Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell have posted reactions to David Bowie’s death. Jane’s Addiction frontman Perry Farrell also wrote a poignant blog.

Jane’s Addiction frontman Perry Farrell posted the following Facebook blog:

David Bowie is gone. You’ve heard by now; it’s true. We will never again hear him sing to us. A loved one has died. We were moved- changed by his ways. When we speak of musical talent, only the greatest musicians can effect us to where we can not help but cry when their music reaches the most tender, unguarded spot in our hearts.
I am angry, for our man was snatched from us tonight.

Honesty has everything to do with great music. When you listen to a singer, the vulnerability, the bravery it took to reveal their very special soul. It’s like being able to communicate with an alien, or a tiger. Tickle his chin. Pet him.

We were aloud to dance with him. He was so beautiful. You’ll not find another man with such beauty and calmness. I so enjoyed putting on his music and singing along, adding harmony to his sexy scarey world. It was a privilege to witness such cool. I placed him on a godlike level. His grace on the stage was spellbinding, effortless. Music cowritten with angels.. Along with John Lennon, the two most inspiring men of my lifetime. When I first started singing, I would rent out a small room with a PA, and a mic. I would put on Bowie recordings; the early ones- like Ziggy and try to sing along. It was so hard. I would try and reach his high notes- glad at that moment that no one could hear me screeching along to the music.

Can someone bring him back to life? Where is that prize winning scientist when you need him most? What could be more important? I’ll bet someone out there would pay a billion dollars to have him sing again. One more time. If I had the money- I would pay it gladly. We so painfully miss you David Bowie.

Top 10 Rock Songs Of 2015

Alternative Nation released its top 10 rock albums of the year just a couple of weeks ago, but that list was voted by readers. Below is a list of the top 10 rock songs of 2015, as selected by Alternative Nation owner Brett Buchanan and reporters Jeff Gorra, Mike Mazzarone, and Elias Fulmer.

10. Failure – “Hot Traveler” (The Heart is a Monster)

Brett Buchanan: Loyal readers Felonious Punk and J mentioned this album in the comments section when we recently did our Album of the Year poll, and it made me go back and revisit it. “Hot Traveler” is definitely the standout with its plodding grungy riff.

9. Dead Sara – “Something Good” (Pleasure To Meet You)

Brett Buchanan: Dead Sara returned with their second album earlier this year, and the standout track by far is definitely “Something Good.” The track has that classic California summertime feel, with a standout performance from lead singer Emily Armstrong.

8. Cage The Elephant – “Cold Cold Cold” (Tell Me I’m Pretty)

Mike Mazzarone: I could list ANY track from Tell Me I’m Pretty, they are all simply amazing songs. From the “Eleanor Rigby” inspired “Sweetie Little Jean”, the “Something” inspired “Trouble,” to the infamous “Mess Around”. When I first heard the album I had a sinking feeling it would be all Black Keys soundalike tracks. However, that wasn’t the case at all. “Cold, Cold, Cold” has pure 60’s flair.

I could imagine Bob Dylan belting out the “Oh no ain’t it a drag” part, and there are huge David Bowie influences as well. It’s just a fantastic album. I’m not sure if it’s their best effort, especially in comparison to Melophobia, but like Doug McCausland said in our review of Tell Me I’m Pretty – I don’t care! This is a band that everyone should get into, and hear their albums all the way though. They are one of the best acts in modern rock, and they are here to stay.

7. Foo Fighters – “The Never Ending Sigh” (Saint Cecilia EP)

Jeff Gorra: This song just rocks. It’s simple and catchy. It feels like this song in particular captures the vibe of exactly what the Foos did with this surprising EP. I just imagine sitting on the porch of that hotel with beer bottles, hearing this song being jammed.

6. The Arcs – “Stay In My Corner” (Yours, Dreamily)

Brett Buchanan: Black Keys frontman Dan Auerbach released a new album this year with his new side project band The Arcs, and “Stay In My Corner” is just as great as any recent Black Keys hit. The soulful blues ballad is definitely the highlight of the album, with the lyrics telling a love story with the backdrop of boxing.

5. Chris Cornell – “Nearly Forgot My Broken Heart” (Higher Truth)

Jeff Gorra: It’s signature Cornell, exploratory and courageous all at the same time. It also has the flexibility to plug into multiple genres.

4. Marilyn Manson – “Third Day Of A Seven Day Binge” (The Pale Emperor)

Mike Mazzarone: After a string of meh to forgettable albums it was Manson who in early 2015 decided to reinvent himself as this gritty, Mark Lanegan sounding rocker. The result? Pale Emperor and it’s hit single “Third Day Of A Seven Day Binge”. I knew this album was going to make or break the recording future for Manson as he, up to that point hasn’t put anything really up to scratch since 2000’s Holy Wood. After a string of “meh” albums, it was time for a release like this and Manson defied any expectations.

3. Eagles of Death Metal – “I Love You All the Time” (Zipper Down)

Elias Fulmer: Now the most well known track from the Eagles of Death Metal’s 2015 Zipper Down, the song’s jangly glam rock stands in defiance of the face of terrorism, with ISIL assaulting the Bataclan where Eagles of Death Metal played on November 13th. It has spun a campaign for other artists to cover it, with the proceeds going to the Sweet Stuff Charity.

2. Faith No More – “Superhero” (Sol Invictus)

Brett Buchanan: While “Motherfucker” was Faith No More’s official comeback single, “Superhero” is really the fitting reintroduction to the band after a 18 year hiatus from recording. The infectious piano chords throughout the song really drive the song, and Mike Patton somehow manages to conjure of the dark spirit of the 90’s without sounding like he’s trying to, unlike some of his contemporaries.

1. Scott Weiland – “Circles” (Blaster)

Brett Buchanan: “Circles” unfortunately ended up being the bookend to legendary Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland’s 23-year studio discography. Guitarist Jeremy Brown kept it simple with with the musical arrangement, playing a memorable riff throughout the song. When it came to vocals, Scott Weiland went back to the country music he grew up listening, with one of his most memorable melodies in recent memory. Weiland’s lyrics are beautifully haunting, but with a sense of hope, like many of his greatest songs.

Chris Cornell Releases Family Christmas Photo That Resembles ‘King Animal’ Cover

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell has released a family Christmas photo that resembles an alternate version of the Soundgarden King Animal album cover. Merry Christmas to to the readers and artists covered on Alternative Nation!

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Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was recently interviewed by 105.7 the Point, and Alternative Nation has transcribed several quotes. The reporter asked Cornell if it blows his mind that he’s still here, especially with fellow Grunge icons Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain, and Layne Staley having died.

“I don’t know, it’s hard to say. I guess the overall attitude ends up being that it’s a drug issue, but that’s kind of cloudy. I have other friends that are extremely talented musicians that died in different ways.”

He said he doesn’t blame the music industry for rock star deaths.

“What I’m getting at is if you go into a 12-step meeting in any city, and you count 75 people and you ask how many people are musicians, you’re going to get 2, and everybody else is going to be from every walk of life as you can imagine. The same as Scott Weiland’s mother crying, there are mothers crying who have lost their sons who are construction workers, mechanics, literally anything you can think of, and it’s happening every day. The only difference between a musician that’s famous, and that other kid, is we don’t talk about them on the radio, that’s kind of it. They’re not somebody that is a public personality that’s already been talked about for other reasons.”

“Then I also think there’s kind of a history of glamorizing a little bit the ‘dead guy,’ whether it’s a rock star or a famous actor. James Dean, he only made three movies, and he’s one of the best known actors of all time. Granted, I think everyone agreed that he was really talented, and he died in a sort of glamorous bad ass way, which was in a little race car on his way to a race, driving it himself. I think there’s something to the legend of that, and the story of that, but one of the things I’ve experienced over and over again, which I think is a way that people deal with it, particularly when it’s somebody that is already kind of celebrated for something, is that we kind of invent the idea that it was ‘predetermined’ I think. That’s where I get impatient with it, because if that’s the case, then it’s predetermined with every kid that ends up with a substance abuse habit, and dies from it.”

Cornell also discussed personal responsibility when it comes to an addict dying, not blaming hanging out with ‘the wrong crowd’ for death. Cornell said he sees it as a parental way of dealing with it, and that he doesn’t agree with blaming other people for the addict’s death. “I’m not saying that is entirely wrong, but if someone has the propensity to abuse alcohol or drugs, and if they didn’t meet the wrong sort this weekend, they’re going to meet another guy somewhere else, if you have that in you.”

He later said, “I don’t think that, at the end of the day, if a person really wants to get better, anything can stop them, and if a person doesn’t want to, they won’t. You can’t make them do it.”

Chris Cornell Talks ‘Glamorizing’ Of Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain & Layne Staley’s Deaths

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was recently interviewed by 105.7 the Point, and Alternative Nation has transcribed several quotes. The reporter asked Cornell if it blows his mind that he’s still here, especially with fellow Grunge icons Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain, and Layne Staley having died.

“I don’t know, it’s hard to say. I guess the overall attitude ends up being that it’s a drug issue, but that’s kind of cloudy. I have other friends that are extremely talented musicians that died in different ways.”

He said he doesn’t blame the music industry for rock star deaths.

“What I’m getting at is if you go into a 12-step meeting in any city, and you count 75 people and you ask how many people are musicians, you’re going to get 2, and everybody else is going to be from every walk of life as you can imagine. The same as Scott Weiland’s mother crying, there are mothers crying who have lost their sons who are construction workers, mechanics, literally anything you can think of, and it’s happening every day. The only difference between a musician that’s famous, and that other kid, is we don’t talk about them on the radio, that’s kind of it. They’re not somebody that is a public personality that’s already been talked about for other reasons.”

“Then I also think there’s kind of a history of glamorizing a little bit the ‘dead guy,’ whether it’s a rock star or a famous actor. James Dean, he only made three movies, and he’s one of the best known actors of all time. Granted, I think everyone agreed that he was really talented, and he died in a sort of glamorous bad ass way, which was in a little race car on his way to a race, driving it himself. I think there’s something to the legend of that, and the story of that, but one of the things I’ve experienced over and over again, which I think is a way that people deal with it, particularly when it’s somebody that is already kind of celebrated for something, is that we kind of invent the idea that it was ‘predetermined’ I think. That’s where I get impatient with it, because if that’s the case, then it’s predetermined with every kid that ends up with a substance abuse habit, and dies from it.”

Cornell also discussed personal responsibility when it comes to an addict dying, not blaming hanging out with ‘the wrong crowd’ for death. Cornell said he sees it as a parental way of dealing with it, and that he doesn’t agree with blaming other people for the addict’s death. “I’m not saying that is entirely wrong, but if someone has the propensity to abuse alcohol or drugs, and if they didn’t meet the wrong sort this weekend, they’re going to meet another guy somewhere else, if you have that in you.”

He later said, “I don’t think that, at the end of the day, if a person really wants to get better, anything can stop them, and if a person doesn’t want to, they won’t. You can’t make them do it.”

Top 10 Rock Albums Of 2015

Nearly 10,000 Alternative Nation readers voted, and we now have the Top 10 Rock Albums of 2015!

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10. Kurt Cobain – Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings

It’s basic, low-fi, and stripped down to the bare bones. It’s raw! The Montage of Heck soundtrack companion jumps straight into Cobain’s psyche. From the opening strumming and mumbles on “The Yodel Song,” to the ever-angelic, elongated, work-in-progress take of “Do Re Mi,” the album is a trip inside of Cobain’s creative process.

It feels exactly like you’re in the room with Kurt, as he’s practicing the chords, tuning the guitar, or just goofing off with one of his voices for comedy. In conclusion, Montage Of Heck: The Home Recordings (Deluxe Ed.) is exactly what any hardcore Nirvana/ Kurt Cobain fan would love, to understand the creative process – along with the film, of Kurt Cobain. (Full review)

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9. Dead Sara – Pleasure To Meet You

Dead Sara returned with their second album Pleasure To Meet You earlier this year, featuring the triumphant but tragic “Suicidal,” the California rocker “Something Good,” and Grunge tinged “Mona Lisa.”

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8. Puscifer – Money Shot

While Tool fans anxiously await for what is becoming their version of Chinese Democracy, Maynard James Keenan kept rolling with Puscifer’s Money Shot. The video for the title track perfectly encapsulates the appeal of the album, bring a sense of attitude and heaviness, but juxtaposing it with the absurdity of Luchadores fighting in a bar.

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7. Chris Cornell – Higher Truth

Chris Cornell went back to basics with Higher Truth, stripping away the Timbaland beats and synth found on 2009’s Scream. The album was very much in the same vein as his recent Songbook shows, with an adult contemporary stripped down sound that sounds very age appropriate. “Dead Wishes,” a song that analyzes the psyche of homeless people, is one of Cornell’s better tracks he has recorded in the last several years. (Full review)

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6. John Frusciante – Renoise Tracks 2009-2011

Some complained of 2015’s Trickfinger as underdeveloped and bare bones. Those tracks were made in 2007-2008 and it in the following years, 2009-2011 worked on these tracks and there is a supreme difference. With clips of audio from different media, it almost feels like a movie. It is awesome to see Frusciante progress like this and I can only imagine what his work sounds like today, the work he has been working on this year. He evolved a lot from Trickfinger to Renoise, what will the coming work sound like? Frusciante easily could become a hit in the underground electronic scene, he seems to take a lot of good element from those scenes and makes it exclusively his own. (Full review)

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5. Eagles of Death Metal – Zipper Down

Zipper Down is their fourth studio album, and it has been seven years since the last. This time, original members Jesse Hughes (on the album cover referred to as Boots Electric) and Josh Homme (Baby Duck) do everything themselves without help from additional musicians, which is not necessarily a bad thing. The album hit the right spot immediately.

The first track, ”Complexity”, captures the spirit of EoDM: funky, uptempo and fun. ”Silverlake”, ”Got a Woman” and ”Got the Power” follow the same pattern, while ”I Love You All The Time” is a slower song that is, as the title suggests, full of love. ”Skin-Tight Boogie” is a groovy kind of rap, featuring Hughes’ girlfriend Tuesday Cross on backing vocals. (Full review)

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4. Foo Fighters – Saint Cecilia (EP)

Foo Fighters surprised fans last month with a new EP recorded in Austin, Texas. The eponymous “Saint Cecilia” kicks off the E.P. with the “comfort food” side of the Foos familiar in tunes like “Walk” and “Learn to Fly”, with layered vocals from Dave Grohl accompanying a country/heartland melody. “Sean”, the shortest and fastest tune of the release clocking in at 02:11, captures a pop-punk vibe in the verses punctuated by a simple chorus hook consisting of a noodly riff and shouts of “Sean!”.

“Savior Breath” fuses the Foos’ Washington D.C. hardcore punk roots with Motorhead; it’s one of the group’s heaviest songs, right up there with “White Limo” off of 2011’s Wasting Light. Dave Grohl’s solo is one of the most memorable out of his recent output. “Iron Rooster” is the slow acoustic ballad here, capturing a bit of a Pink Floyd-vibe in Dave Grohl’s vocals and loose guitar solos. (Full review)

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3. Scott Weiland & The Wildabouts – Blaster

Editor’s pick for best album of the year: Blaster was Scott Weiland’s first album of original material in 5 years, and he hadn’t lost a step creatively. On the album Weiland hit melodic highs, and his lyrics were as beautiful, dark, and abstract as ever. “Amethyst” is one of the album’s highlights, a throwback to Purple era Weiland, featuring Jeremy Brown’s greatest guitar solo on the album.

In the one of the album’s most powerful songs, “Parachute,” Weiland sang about seeing through the eyes of love: ‘Catch you when you’re fallin’/Even when you’re not/I’ll see you through the eyes of love/Even when you’re crawlin’/Even when you’re fallin’/I’ll be your parachute, hold you up.’ The song feels like a spiritual successor to “Dare If You Dare,” with a feeling of frenetic euphoria driving the ending.

“Circles” ended up being the bookend to Weiland’s discography with his death just a few weeks ago, and it will definitely end up going down as one of his most underrated tracks. The country tinged ballad has themes of love, desperation, but also a feeling of hope sprinkled throughout it. (Full review)

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2. Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor

For this LP, the non-conventional approach at first seemed to convey a somewhat underwhelming experience, yet with time, a more detailed and expansive sound was revealed on tracks like “Warship My Wreck,” “Slave Only Dreams to be King,” and “The Devil Beneath My Feet.” The current singles are not the strongest released in his catalog, but still provides a heavy edge. In conclusion, The Pale Emperor is a significant milestone in Marilyn Manson’s musical career as he takes a step farther in a dark, melodic direction. (Full review)

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1. Faith No More – Sol Invictus

Faith No More live reunions have been on and off since 2009, but the large gap of time between an official album release had lead the quirky, alternative rock community to borderline hopeless until more recently. Marked as their seventh album in the discography, Sol Invictus, clearly had a reputation to live up to.

On the album, Faith No More still have the means of creating enjoyable tracks that mediate between a mainstream sound and avant-garde. Although it is clear which songs will fall through the cracks with time, a few tracks plus the singles are deserving of high praise and allow this album to serve as a solid return to the rock world after eighteen years. (Full review)

Chris Cornell Rips ‘One Guy With A Bunch Of New Guys’ Reunions

Chris Cornell discussed writing Soundgarden’s new album in a new interview with DC101, and also criticized rock reunions, particularly ones with only one original member. Alternative Nation has transcribed Cornell’s comments.

“Once we were done with King Animal, I felt like we didn’t skip a beat really, we’re still the same band we always were. Everybody still has the same capabilities they always did have, plus some new tools in the toolbox that we developed in the decade that we weren’t together.”

“Without comparing to specific other bands, a lot of things can happen when a band takes a decade or more off, and then reform. Sometimes there’s personnel changes, sometimes there’s kind of a directional shift, where they dramatically will sort of go for something that is the sound of the moment, and kind of abandon their own identity to the degree that it’s really alienating, and I’m speaking as a fan now of bands where they’ve done that. I think the thing that happens the most is one guy with a bunch of new guys, and still calling it the same band, and pretending it’s the same band.”

He added, “It’s different people, and that’s something we never would have done.”

Chris Cornell’s Soundgarden bandmates also ripped ‘one man bands’ in a 2013 Gigwise interview, with many fans assuming they were talking about Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan based on his comments criticizing their reunion for being a cash grab.

Kim Thayil: “It’s not possible for us to do a bad record. Here’s how it’s possible to do a bad record. You’ve got one jackass who runs the whole thing, and a bunch of guys they hire around him.”

Matt Cameron: “Who you talking about?”

Ben Shepherd: “You mean the yes men?”

Kim Thayil: “Now you can make a bad record because your stupid ideas aren’t being bounced around, going to the fucking ether.”

Ben Shepherd: “Some are like a yes men thing, we’re like a no men thing.”

Kim Thayil: “If you’ve got a band where one guy calls the shots, that’s a band that’s going to suck. Because the guy might have bad thoughts in his head. Well I just came out of sobriety and I’ve got this idea for a rock record, I just married my third wife and I have this new idea for a rock record.”

Ben Shepherd: “How we deal with it is we just control ourselves so we just focus on what we’re going to do, how and what we’re going to be and that’s all you can really control in life, not what some dickhead says about you, so you just don’t worry about it.”

Chris Cornell Remembers Meeting Scott Weiland

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell remembered meeting late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland for the first time in a recent interview with KROQ. Alternative Nation has transcribed his comments.

“I think it was at something like this, or maybe it was the Grammys, it was an award show, and he walked by. I don’t think I even spoke to him. Somebody said, ‘That’s the guy from STP.’ That was like my first encounter. I think that is sort of what ends up happening in the life of musicians and entertainers. Sometimes we’re in sort of organic atmospheres, like it’s someones’ house, mutual friends, but most of the time you run into people at crazy events, where everyone is sort of wondering how they fit in anyway.”

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell paid tribute to late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland at his recent concerts in Melbourne. Cornell dedicated his performance of Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” to Weiland at a show, according to a fan. “Say Hello 2 Heaven” originally was recorded as a tribute to the Grunge era’s first casualty, Mother Love Bone singer Andy Wood. MusicFeeds and an Alternative Nation reader report that “Higher Truth” was dedicated to Weiland at Friday’s show. The reader told us, “It was very beautiful and amazing …Respect.” Fans have praised Cornell’s performance on Twitter. Weiland was found dead on his tour bus in Minnesota on Thursday night. He was 48.

Chris Cornell Talks ‘Stupid’ Temple of the Dog Legal Battle

Chris Cornell discussed the legal battle over the Temple of the Dog master tapes in a new interview with Rolling Stone Australia.

“I don’t think so. It’s kind of a stupid thing. Unfortunately the band is not really part of this dispute. Temple of the Dog had a contract with A&M Records and there are specifics in that and it’s A&M Records that owns the masters, and doesn’t have them. And if anyone besides them would have the right to own them it would certainly be us first. But ultimately legally it’s not a fight that we can ever be in. It’s a strange thing.”

He also discussed balancing his solo career with working on a new Soundgarden record, “Yeah. If I’m not on tour or making an album for myself I’m always focusing on Soundgarden. It’s kind of what I do. And in the last five years it’s been pretty amazing to be able to do this acoustic solo career simultaneously with Soundgarden, which is like this sonic assault. And to be able to bounce back between the two always feels refreshing.”

Is Audioslave Reuniting This Weekend?

Chris Cornell is set to perform at KROQ Almost Acoustic Christmas on Sunday in Los Angeles, and his former Audioslave bandmate is set to perform on Saturday in Los Angeles at a benefit concert for Tony McAlpine featuring Steve Vai, Zakk Wylde, Mike Portnoy, Billy Sheehan, Derek Sherinian, and John 5. Morello will take part in an ‘all star jam’ with Nuno Betancourt and Richie Kotzen. Some fans are speculating that Audioslave could do a surprise set in Los Angeles at one of these shows.

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Chris Cornell recently told Music Radar that he wants Audioslave to reunite.

“Yeah, I think it would be great. We did a lot of songs, and with the benefit of having not done anything with those guys for so long, I can’t imagine what it would be. It would be a really amazing experience just to get back and work with the same guys again.

“We were certainly a prolific group of people; we wrote three whole albums in around five years, maybe less. And these were albums that were raw, and we had extra material, and we just never seemed to have trouble ever trying to agree on what would come out of the songs.

“They were great guys, and I really enjoyed the experience that I had with them, so yeah, I would always be open to doing something.”

Do you think Audioslave will reunite this weekend, or will we have to wait in 2016? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Listen To Chris Cornell’s Tribute To Scott Weiland “Say Hello 2 Heaven”

Listen to Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell perform Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” in tribute to the late Scott Weiland below!

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell paid tribute to late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland at his recent concerts in Melbourne. Cornell dedicated his performance of Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” to Weiland at a show, according to a fan. “Say Hello 2 Heaven” originally was recorded as a tribute to the Grunge era’s first casualty, Mother Love Bone singer Andy Wood. MusicFeeds and an Alternative Nation reader report that “Higher Truth” was dedicated to Weiland at Friday’s show. The reader told us, “It was very beautiful and amazing …Respect.” Fans have praised Cornell’s performance on Twitter. Weiland was found dead on his tour bus in Minnesota on Thursday night. He was 48.

Right now is a time for fans to really stop and appreciate some of the voices we still have left from the Grunge era like Chris Cornell, Eddie Vedder, Billy Corgan, and Mark Lanegan. Rest in peace Scott Weiland, Layne Staley, Kurt Cobain, Andy Wood, Mike Starr, Shannon Hoon, and the rest of a list that is far too long.

Stone Temple Pilots have released the following statement on Scott Weiland’s death:

Dear Scott,

Let us start by saying thank you for sharing your life with us.

Together we crafted a legacy of music that has given so many people happiness and great memories.

The memories are many, and they run deep for us.

We know amidst the good and the bad you struggled, time and time again.

It’s what made you who you were.

You were gifted beyond words, Scott.

Part of that gift was part of your curse.

With deep sorrow for you and your family, we are saddened to see you go.

All of our love and respect.

We will miss you brother,

Robert, Eric, Dean

Chris Cornell Reveals When Soundgarden Will Record New Album

Chris Cornell told The Advertiser Confidential that Soundgarden will begin recording their next album immediately after he concludes touring Higher Truth. The band already started working on material a couple of months ago.

“It’s great to be able to do the Soundgarden stuff and my solo career simultaneously,” he says.

“That’s what makes me lucky as a performer. As soon as this album cycle is over I’m working on Soundgarden songs for an album — I get to do a lot of different things and it feels like I get to have my cake and eat it too.”

Cornell also discussed his longevity in the industry, ““It feels much shorter but the scary thing is means I’m much older than the next guy doing this,” he says. “But you know it’s rare that someone who comes from the world I come from which is indie alternative can have a career this long and be able to still make new music.”

Chris Cornell Pays Tribute To Scott Weiland

UPDATE: An Alternative Nation reader has told us more about Chris Cornell’s tribute to Scott Weiland, “He just explained how he’d heard about Scott and wanted to dedicate ‘Higher Truth’ to him because it was heartbreaking how he’d died.”

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell paid tribute to late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland at his recent concerts in Melbourne. Cornell dedicated his performance of Temple of the Dog’s “Say Hello 2 Heaven” to Weiland at a show, according to a fan. “Say Hello 2 Heaven” originally was recorded as a tribute to the Grunge era’s first casualty, Mother Love Bone singer Andy Wood. MusicFeeds and an Alternative Nation reader report that “Higher Truth” was dedicated to Weiland at Friday’s show. The reader told us, “It was very beautiful and amazing …Respect.” While video has not surfaced yet of the performances, fans have praised Cornell on Twitter. Weiland was found dead on his tour bus in Minnesota on Thursday night. He was 48.

Right now is a time for fans to really stop and appreciate some of the voices we still have left from the Grunge era like Chris Cornell, Eddie Vedder, Billy Corgan, and Mark Lanegan. Rest in peace Scott Weiland, Layne Staley, Kurt Cobain, Andy Wood, Mike Starr, Shannon Hoon, and the rest of a list that is far too long.

Stone Temple Pilots have released the following statement on Scott Weiland’s death:

Dear Scott,

Let us start by saying thank you for sharing your life with us.

Together we crafted a legacy of music that has given so many people happiness and great memories.

The memories are many, and they run deep for us.

We know amidst the good and the bad you struggled, time and time again.

It’s what made you who you were.

You were gifted beyond words, Scott.

Part of that gift was part of your curse.

With deep sorrow for you and your family, we are saddened to see you go.

All of our love and respect.

We will miss you brother,

Robert, Eric, Dean

Chris Cornell Reacts To Justin Bieber Wearing Nirvana Shirt

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was recently asked by The Rock FM about Justin Bieber wearing a Nirvana t-shirt to the American Music Awards, and if a celebrity like Bieber wearing a Soundgarden or Audioslave t-shirt would offend him.

“Yeah I don’t think I’ve ever – I mean I guess I’m enough into the idea of promotion and self-promotion that I don’t think there’s a bad version of that, really. Anyone can wear one, and it feels like it’d be good.”

The host mentioned that as long as Cornell is getting a slice of the t-shirt pie, they can wear it.

Cornell responded, “Exactly, exactly.”

Cornell also spoke on the current state of rock music in the same interview.

“I think really to understand the current state of rock music you sort of have to be able to shift the perception a little, or think about what rock music means…and to me I think kind of, and I think what it always meant from the very beginning that it was sort of the homespun music of the street…or anybody’s music, it was the voice of anybody who wanted to do it, who felt like doing it. You didn’t have to be musically educated, you didn’t have to be literally educated, you didn’t have to come from royalty…you could be anyone and anyone could participate in it, like country and western.

I think a lot of that has shifted to the hip hop world or even the electronic world, where now, you can make an album on a laptop inside a studio apartment and young kids that are listening to music, as opposed to guitar based rock music or even music that even be made on a laptop, and they’re learning how to do it, and that’s inspring them. They have the capability of doing that. I think having technology, plus having some really huge hip hop artists, has shifted that to where the first urge of some kids who write a song or make a recording, might not be guitar, bass, drums and vocals, it might not be “let’s try to sound like Nirvana”, it might something much more in the direction of hip hop or rap or electronica, it might be Skrillex instead.”