Tag Archives: billy corgan

Billy Corgan Reveals Size Of Marilyn Manson’s Penis

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan recently recorded a funny Facebook video with TNA wrestler Grado at an Impact Wrestling television taping in the United Kingdom.

Grado sarcastically asks Corgan, “I’m sitting here with Billy Corgan of The Smashing Pumpkins, and I’ve got a question that’s been on my mind for quite some time. Billy, what size is Marilyn Manson’s cock?”

Corgan quips back, “Well, it’s bigger than yours.”

Grado says, “You don’t know the size of my cock.”

BillCo deadpans, “No, I’ve seen your cock, it’s a bally half incher.”

Corgan has also been doing live Facebook videos, discussing his new documentary he is filming across about America that he hopes to turn into a series. Last night, Corgan criticized the Super Bowl.

“That was a terrible Super Bowl, I have to say. I mean you got the big Peyton Manning walk off into the sunset win, but what a shnoozo.”

Corgan also spent a lot of time answering fan questions, revealing that he hopes to have long 3 hour Smashing Pumpkins sets next year with Jimmy Chamberlin back in the fold, much like their 2007 Zeitgeist tour. He also revealed that many demos from his solo album TheFutureEmbrace sounded like Siamese Dream.

Billy Corgan Says Guns N’ Roses Should Have Reunited Sooner

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan commented on Guns N’ Roses reunion on the Mancow show earlier this week. Corgan said he was excited, “Yeah, I wish it had come sooner. Great band.” Corgan also has announced a Siamese Dream medley will be played on the new Smashing Pumpkins, and that he is making a documentary about America where he will go to fans houses:

In Frank Capra’s indomitable film ‘Mr. Smith Goes To Washington’, a wide-eyed doe of a man leaves his home to add one heartfelt voice to the conversation, and conversion, of humankind through politics. Facing as he goes along the raw gears of a system built not for the common good, but power, and learns as he loses the hardest lesson of all; that it is God’s law we fight for, and not ourselves, which in turn becomes the truest enrichment of all: possession of the Truth.

But what is indeed ‘true’? Ask a neighbor, and he or she will oftentimes give you answers that are wholly unlike your own, drawn from sources closer to copied digital messages and myths than the wellspring of history. As if this epoch alone is wholly made anew, and our ancestors were infinitely more stupid than we. Yet we in the West endeavor by a standard of living they could only dream of, and would laugh (I presume) at our wastefulness and common cruelty; for what we tear down we rip with distant hands, and behind the mask of a helix ID.

Mark of the Beast, indeed.

So feel free to align where I place myself in that story; that is, if you can accept that I was once innocent. But innocence in these sinews reigns no more, and with it’s abandonment went those star-zapping powers that sang so readily about my descents into the glass darkly. And the trinkets traded freely for faith.

Indeed, words are usually powerless without heart. And by that standard I stand accused. For often I’ve said far too much, and too often, without some clear intent by which to measure myself other than a wish to be proven right by time. So if there is a judge listening, it is here I wish to resign my long-beleaguered suit against so many. The grounds upon which it labored, meritless.

So what does that leave untouched? A simple impression found, and the music comes of it.

For newer sights I look towards ruinous America, and her open road. Or something approximating the mightiest byway of the 1800’s, the grand Mississippi, and that closest urbane chimera, Route 66. Add one ruddy military vet and a stack of maps, and we’ll hit out on those same veins and tributaries, heading from Chicago first towards more temperate climes. Hopeful that I might write a new album by using the milk of Delta mud, amongst other things.

Too obscure thus far? How’s this to be straight…?

My mate Justin and I are set to head out and chart the beginnings of a new documentary I’m aching to make about America. And as we meet strangers and friends in living rooms and backyards and porches, and near campfires and rusting trolleys, we’ll need your help of where to go and what we must see. If that intrigues you, and you or yours have family along our route, we’d like you to contact us with good heart. For we’ll need help and support to make this work as I imagine it in my mind. To sketch at least the beginnings of a project that may be so vast it’ll take much more than a 3 week roustabout to understand.

For example, my grandfather was at one juncture of his life a coal miner. So though it may seem I’d be more interested in where the cool kids hang about, we’ll be much more taken with documenting the stories of an elderly class that can share impressions of the country as it once was; good, bad, or indifferent. And in order to do so with integrity, I’ll need to be invited into old-fashioned parlors and the like to retain some sense memory of what’s come and gone. In exchange, I’ll bring along a guitar to play, in what we’ll call an unofficial tour before the IN PLAINSONG shows; all of which go on sale this Friday, February 5th.

As of now, our start date is immediate, where we’ll head southward along the river Illinois to the Mississippi, and then west, posting an intended route each morning; but flexible to where the wind take us. To make what I’ll deign as a living postcard before all is so faded from view that it is all but unrecognizable through pictures. For what stands left of the temples of Rome but what the Caesars forgot to destroy?

So find us if you will, and guide us…(our contact information can be found below, at the bottom of this post).

Speaking of the IN PLAINSONG tour, work has begun on constructing a long and varied set, which this round will feature in its midst a suite of Siamese Dream songs; much like the eight-or-so from Adore we did last year. The neat thing about the constructed suites being you can hear all the pieces together, strung out and fairly close to the form in which they were written. And judging by the most recent interest in this album, I’ll presume this will be a highlight each night.

If not, we look to touch on every other period of my songwriting for you (if possible with only so much time), including tunes from Zwan and The Future Embrace, and maybe even or two I’ve helped others write. And certainly with Jimmy Chamberlin there, plus Jeff Schroeder, Sierra Swan, and Katie Cole (multi-instrumentalists all), our choices for presentation and dynamics are wide open.

We hope to see you there!

William

Scott Stapp Calls Billy Corgan On Radio, Would He Fight Him?

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan appeared on the Mancow show, and former Creed frontman Scott Stapp awkwardly called into the show during Corgan’s appearance for just a minute. Alternative Nation transcribed the call.

Mancow: Creed and The Smashing Pumpkins battled each other on the charts. If you were in our studio right now, would you and Billy fight?

Scott Stapp: Absolutely not. I’m a huge fan.

Billy Corgan: Hey Scott. I met Scott when the band was first coming up, great guy. I haven’t seen him for years, but a great guy.

Mancow: We’ve had some memories, oh dear god, this guy.

Scott: We’ve had some fun.

Mancow: Okay Scott, I’m going to say goodbye to you. Farley and Scott, two piles of cocaine I will never forget. Not my thing.

Billy: One for Scott, and one for Chris, and you just watched.

Mancow then added that he himself has never done cocaine.

February 1, 2016—New York— Building on their fans’ demands for more of last year’s brief, but critically acclaimed In Plainsong tour, The Smashing Pumpkins return to the road this spring to bring the Acoustic-Electro Evening across the country for a full run of classic North American theaters.

Last year’s shows sold out in a matter of minutes, and the iconic venues the band picked for the performances proved the perfect intimate settings for an evening of acoustic based music and electronic soundscapes that allowed the Pumpkins to explore their whole song catalog in a unique way. The reaction to the run was overwhelmingly positive, with reviews calling the performances “electric” and “emotionally charged”.

“What started as an interest in playing a truly different kind of show and looking for a different way to explore their storied musical past morphed into something new and exciting for the fans in every city”, said the group’s manager Peter Katsis, “this touches the opposing side to The Pumpkins usual roar!”

The Grammy Award-winning rock group, which includes Billy Corgan, Jimmy Chamberlin and Jeff Schroeder, will kick off the 19-city tour on March 22nd in Portland, OR and wrap on April 20th in Houston, TX.

Tickets for the In Plainsong tour will go on sale beginning Friday, February 5th at 9am EST. Tickets will be available at http://www.smashingpumpkinsnexus.com/ Citi is the official credit card of the In Plainsong North American Tour. Citi cardmembers will have access to presale tickets beginning Tuesday, February 2nd, at 9AM ET through Thursday, February 4th through Citi’s Private Pass Program. For complete presale details visit www.citiprivatepass.com.

The Pumpkins, always the rock and roll iconoclasts, will invert the traditional formula again by touring first before heading straight to the studio after the dates to record a brand new album inspired by the sounds explored in the new acoustic setting.

Singer-songwriter Liz Phair is set to open the show for the Smashing Pumpkins on her first full tour of the U.S. in 6 years. Her debut studio album Exile in Guyville was released to critical acclaim and has been ranked by Rolling Stone as one of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time.” More than two decades after the release of her debut, Phair’s influence over female voices in alternative music can still be felt today.

2015 proved to be great for the Pumpkins, who saw their End Times summer tour in support of last year’s Monuments to an Elegy album produce their best ticket sales in over 12 years. The Chicago Sun-Times called their performance “epic,” while Rolling Stone exclaimed that the current line-up “played with the tightness of a time-tested unit.”

With 20 million albums sold in the United States alone, the Smashing Pumpkins are one of rock’s most commercially successful and critically acclaimed bands.

Since their inception, the Smashing Pumpkins disavowed the punk rock roots of many of their alt-rock contemporaries by creating a diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy sound, containing elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, progressive rock, and even electronica.

They broke into the musical mainstream as their second album, 1993’s Siamese Dream, sold over 6 million copies. From there, the group has continued to build its audience through extensive touring, selling out arenas around the world for over two decades. Their 1995 follow-up recording, double album Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, entered the Billboard Top 200 Album Chart at number one.

Smashing Pumpkins Announce New Album & Tour With Jimmy Chamberlin

THE SMASHING PUMPKINS PRESENT

“IN PLAINSONG”

AN ACOUSTIC-ELECTRO EVENING

TICKETS FOR THE NORTH AMERICAN TOUR ON SALE BEGINNING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH AT 9AM EST

LIZ PHAIR TO OPEN

NEW RECORDING TO FOLLOW TOUR

February 1, 2016—New York— Building on their fans’ demands for more of last year’s brief, but critically acclaimed In Plainsong tour, The Smashing Pumpkins return to the road this spring to bring the Acoustic-Electro Evening across the country for a full run of classic North American theaters.

Last year’s shows sold out in a matter of minutes, and the iconic venues the band picked for the performances proved the perfect intimate settings for an evening of acoustic based music and electronic soundscapes that allowed the Pumpkins to explore their whole song catalog in a unique way. The reaction to the run was overwhelmingly positive, with reviews calling the performances “electric” and “emotionally charged”.

“What started as an interest in playing a truly different kind of show and looking for a different way to explore their storied musical past morphed into something new and exciting for the fans in every city”, said the group’s manager Peter Katsis, “this touches the opposing side to The Pumpkins usual roar!”

The Grammy Award-winning rock group, which includes Billy Corgan, Jimmy Chamberlin and Jeff Schroeder, will kick off the 19-city tour on March 22nd in Portland, OR and wrap on April 20th in Houston, TX.

Tickets for the In Plainsong tour will go on sale beginning Friday, February 5th at 9am EST. Tickets will be available at http://www.smashingpumpkinsnexus.com/ Citi is the official credit card of the In Plainsong North American Tour. Citi cardmembers will have access to presale tickets beginning Tuesday, February 2nd, at 9AM ET through Thursday, February 4th through Citi’s Private Pass Program. For complete presale details visit www.citiprivatepass.com.

The Pumpkins, always the rock and roll iconoclasts, will invert the traditional formula again by touring first before heading straight to the studio after the dates to record a brand new album inspired by the sounds explored in the new acoustic setting.

Singer-songwriter Liz Phair is set to open the show for the Smashing Pumpkins on her first full tour of the U.S. in 6 years. Her debut studio album Exile in Guyville was released to critical acclaim and has been ranked by Rolling Stone as one of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time.” More than two decades after the release of her debut, Phair’s influence over female voices in alternative music can still be felt today.

2015 proved to be great for the Pumpkins, who saw their End Times summer tour in support of last year’s Monuments to an Elegy album produce their best ticket sales in over 12 years. The Chicago Sun-Times called their performance “epic,” while Rolling Stone exclaimed that the current line-up “played with the tightness of a time-tested unit.”

With 20 million albums sold in the United States alone, the Smashing Pumpkins are one of rock’s most commercially successful and critically acclaimed bands.

Since their inception, the Smashing Pumpkins disavowed the punk rock roots of many of their alt-rock contemporaries by creating a diverse, densely layered, and guitar-heavy sound, containing elements of gothic rock, heavy metal, dream pop, psychedelic rock, progressive rock, and even electronica.

They broke into the musical mainstream as their second album, 1993’s Siamese Dream, sold over 6 million copies. From there, the group has continued to build its audience through extensive touring, selling out arenas around the world for over two decades. Their 1995 follow-up recording, double album Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, entered the Billboard Top 200 Album Chart at number one.

IN PLAINSONG TOUR DATES

March 22

Portland, OR

Schnitzer Hall

March 23

Seattle, WA

The Paramount

March 25

San Francisco, CA

The Masonic

March 26

Los Angeles, CA

The Theatre at Ace Hotel

March 27

Los Angeles, CA

The Theatre at Ace Hotel

March 29

Salt Lake City, UT

Kingsbury Hall

March 30

Denver, CO

Ellie Caulkins Opera House

April 1

Detroit, MI

The Fillmore

April 2

Columbus, OH

Palace Theatre

April 4

New York, NY

Beacon Theatre

April 8

Philadelphia, PA

Tower Theatre

April 9

Boston, MA

Orpheum Theatre

April 10

Washington, DC

Lincoln Theatre

April 12

Toronto, ONT

Massey Hall

April 14

Chicago, IL

Civic Opera House

April 15

Louisville, KY

Palace Theater

April 16

Nashville, TN

Ryman Auditorium

April 18

Dallas, TX

Majestic Theater

April 19

Austin, TX

Bass Concert Hall

April 20

Houston, TX

Cullen Performance Hall

Foo Fighters & Smashing Pumpkins Unite To Honor David Bowie: A Birthday Celebration

The passing of David Bowie, in the succession of the deaths of Scott Weiland and Lemmy, continue to devastate the hearts of millions if not billions of fans. These three figures, who in total have contributed thousands of songs to the human discography, are sorely missed not only on their creative output but they were massive figures bursting with integrity.

David Bowie, who stepped into the world of alternative rock to prop up and support acts who became some of alternative rock’s most popular acts, like Placebo, had an unprecedented influence on the genre’s development. His work in general, with albums like Hunky Dory, Ziggy Stardust and Diamond Dogs inspired figures like Cobain, Corgan and Farrell, but this all goes without saying. Bowie’s influence bleeds through culture in a blatant and now tragic way.

One thing not always brought up, however, is one of the greatest gatherings of popular musicians, I dare say, of all time. On January 9th, 1997 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, David Bowie hosted a concert for his fiftieth birthday with a surreal lineup. What’s very admirable about Bowie is that he often reached out to people directly influenced by him first, instead of the other way around.

As seen in our featured photo, you can make Bowie surrounded by figures such as Robert Smith of the Cure, Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins, Dave Grohl of Nirvana and the Foo Fighters (as well as Pat Smear), Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal of Placebo and more. To celebrate his birthday, Bowie invited many of his friends and admirers.

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The European alternative rock band Placebo opened for the show. They were touring for their self titled album and were discovered by Bowie and in the late ’90s and became his opening act for several months. He would sing on their sophomore album Without You I’m Nothing on the eponymous track. After opening with some songs from his then recently released album, Earthlings, like “Little Wonder,” he brought out his first guest: Frank Black of the Pixies. Together they performed “Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) from the selfsame titled album. They also performed “Fashion” together, from the same album.

In 1997, the Foo Fighters were flying high on the scene after Nirvana’s demise. No doubt, Bowie was aware of Nirvana’s cover of his song “The Man Who Sold the World.” He even performed at this show with his backing band. One would wonder though, if Cobain had lived if he would have been invited to perform with him. However, the Foo Fighters were invited to play “Hallo Spaceboy,” a song from the 1995 Outside album, with Bowie. They offered a thunderous rendition of the song. Bowie (vocals as well as guitar) and Grohl afterwards would perform the electronic tinged “Seven Years in Tibet” together. “Under Pressure” in later years, would become a staple of the Foo Fighters’ live set.

Sonic Youth, the noise rock band which also had a tremendous air within alternative rock circles, were present to perform and celebrate with Bowie, playing his newest single “I’m Afraid of Americans,” which featured production stylings from Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. Bowie, never afraid to move forward. Below is also included Nine Inch Nails with David Bowie re-orchestrating “Hurt” in 1995, later covered famously by Johnny Cash.

After these performances, David Bowie delivered his hits “Heroes” and “The Man Who Sold the World” with his backing band. Robert Smith from the Cure, emerged from the darkness of backstage to share two songs with Bowie: “The Last Thing You Should Do” and “Quicksand,” though he wanted to do “Young Americans.”

One of the most prominent figures from Bowie’s past, another one of rock’s figures who favored collaboration with admirers, his friend and creative partner Lou Reed joined him on stage for four songs. The two worked on Reed’s album “Transformer” together, which swept the world in storm. The songs they did together that night were “Queen Bitch”, a Lou Reed song “Dirty Blvd” and two songs from Lou Reed’s first major band, the Velvet Underground: “White Light/White Heat” and “Waiting for the Man.” Those latter two songs were frequently covered by Bowie in his past. “Waiting for the Man” was particularly marvelous, with alternating lead vocals from the two. This performance has been a favorite of mine for a long time. It’s nice to revisit and sad to see these figures leave this world.

In 1997, the following song would already have a sentimental and memorial connotation associated with it, Freddie Mercury having passed away a few years before. The duet is shared with his bassist at the time, American bassist Gail Ann Dorsey.

He closed his set with the Ziggy Stardust track, “Moonage Daydream” and seemingly ended the concert with band introductions. The backing band consisted of Reeves Gabrels on guitar, Mike Garson on keyboards (who also worked with the Pumpkins in later years), Zach Alford on drums and Gail Ann Dorsey on bass.

However, as with most great things there is an encore. After an aptly deserved “Happy Birthday!” from Dorsey, some more music emerged. For the encore, Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins, a huge Bowie fan, joined Bowie on stage for “The Jean Genie” and Mott the Hopple’s “All the Young Dudes,” written by Bowie in the early ’70s. In introducing Corgan, Bowie uttered his famous quote, “I don’t know where I’m going from here but I promise it won’t be boring.” The encore was ended with “Space Oddity” which would be covered by the Smashing Pumpkins during their Oceania tour.

Bowie’s death is as sudden as it is grave. I found out coming out of the Primus and Tool concert in San Diego on their latest tour. It hit me the next day and it hit me very hard and at once. While listening to “Teenage Wildlife,” I became incredibly upset and my eyes followed suit. I felt an embrace and goodbye. What I wrote on my band’s page is the only thing that I can really manage to say about his passing:

David Bowie has died and reborn for the last time, as he did hundreds of times during his lifetime. From the Thin White Duke to Ziggy Stardust to Blackstar – Bowie has always been reborn and died, we tend to forget. This time, it just hits us a bit harder because his consistently ever-changing body and essence has gone to its biggest rebirth, a union with the universe. As he ever was, Bowie exists in all of us. He exists in our courage and our engendered ability to face ourselves, to be ourselves no matter what people tell us. And people do change. His music encompasses a lot, but one thing that has always stood out to me is the spirit of bravery – encouraging people to experience the most of life to better themselves and to grow. To dance, to wander in space, to live as teenage wildlife, to be heroes and in the indefinite final acts and climaxes: to be reborn as Lazarus when Jesus gave life back to him in Lazarus’ miraculous resurrection, the utmost compassionate act we can accept to give ourselves as life continues to shape and challenge us. In embracing his deep lessons, Bowie will be continue to be reborn thousands and thousands of times more.

Rest in peace, Blackstar

bowie-photo

 

Smashing Pumpkins Are On ‘A Little Bit Of A Hiatus’

Billy Corgan gave an update on The Smashing Pumpkins in a new interview with Bill Apter on WrestleZone.com (as pictured above).

“I’m in a little bit of a hiatus, but I’ve got a lot of touring plans and stuff.”

Late last year we reported Chicago television personality and spiritual author Jennifer Weigel would have a conversation with Billy Corgan as a part of her series on conversation with significant cultural figures and spirituality. The interview took place December 15th and as Weigel personally responded to me with, the interview would be up this week and finally has surfaced. A two hour event, the first hour mainly consisting of Corgan and Weigel covering a number of different but inter-related topics, including but not limited to Donald Trump, social media, Corgan’s creative process, American and international politics, Corgan’s spiritual influences and much more. The second hour consisted of a dialogue with audience members. Below, we include selected portions of the conversation divided into multiple parts by topic, transcribed exclusively here at Alternative Nation. (All citations are my own)

What Guru Do You Relate With?

JW: “Speaking of gurus and spiritual masters, is there a particular person you’ve read recently that you really resonated with? Whether it be someone decades or thousands of years ago or current?”

BC: “Lately I’ve been reading a lot of Hare Krishna related literature and in the magicaly things that happen when you cast [the question], ‘Is there something here for me to read or understand?’ I wrote my ex-girlfriend a letter, a man who actually grew up in Highland Park just up the road where I live, Radhanath Swami I think is his spiritual name, unbeknown to me he was actually giving a lecture in Highland Park and I had no idea. Anyway I bought a book by him [The Journey Home: Autobiography of an American Swami] about how he became a wandering sadhu in India at the age of 19. Which as you can imagine at the time is pretty unusual. 19 year old kid runs around through the forest with loincloth and a beggar’s bowl. Anyway, so he became a Hare Krishna devotee and I wrote her this letter of things I wanted to address that reading this book made me think we needed to clear the air, more for mine than hers. She wrote back saying, ‘It’s so funny I’m reading the exact same book.’ [audience laughs] It’s pretty good, and she lives in Australia so, it’s pretty good…Again, truth [according to] the Hare Krishna doctrine, or the Vedic idea, is pantheistic to the sense they believe there is only one god and all the other deities, whether it’s Ganesh or Rama, whoever are expressions of God. So there is nothing that I read as someone who was raised Catholic…in the Vedic religion that is at odds with whether or not I believe in Jesus Christ. Because under that thinking there’s many masters and they’re all leading you to the same Valhalla [word unclear].

Who in the World Has it Right?

JW: “As you were raised Cathoic, you’re a fan of Jesus Christ but also Buddha and a lot of leaders…”

BC: “And the Beatles!” [audience laughs]

JW: “And the Beatles and David Bowie! With that in mind and seeing how so many people mess up and kill over religion, does it make you scared or do you just want to move to Canada? I mean right now, who do you think is doing it right? Where, if anywhere, on the globe, if you could choose anywhere? Because I mean I remember we had a conversation and you were like, ‘I’m moving to France!’ and that was before the Paris Attacks. Where do you think they got it right?”

BC: “Nowhere. I think we’ve entered an age where this is a global issue. If you believe in the conspiracy end of it which is there is a conscious move of the ‘robber barons’ of the world, the gross capitalists, to turn our world into one big shopping mall…so if you believe in the conspiracy we are being moved some would say quite deliberately into a global system, especially with recent treaties like the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnersihp or [The Paris Agreement] …if you believe in these ideas than this is the manifestation of the global conversation. Which is obviously at odds with the American hegemony that we sort of dictate how it all rolls. So going back to a spiritual tangent, this is not about trigger words and safe spaces. This is about who calls the shots and whether the tribal nature of humanity [sic].

For example: ‘I’m a proto-lesbian feminist dadada…’ or ‘I’m a French nationalist’ or ‘I am from Chicago’…if you believe in tribalism which is very much beyond race and is more a culture of choice, though some would argue with that. Then what you’re saying is that people are willingly going to set aside their tribal loyalty to get out of the way for someone they don’t know, who has a different belief system or system of justice or whatever. Now it’s easier to put if you’re a fan of the Philadelphia Eagles and you can undestand why someone fronts up on somebody for wearing their jersey and their team is ‘better than yours,’ well is it going to be any different when the guy from Kurdistan thinks his way of life is better than yours? So from the spiritual quotient it’s going to be: ‘how do we align in a way that is progressive and not destructive?’ Because generally when humanity comes across these criss-cross points of ‘my way or your way’, it gets violent. One only needs Gibbons’ ‘History of the Roman Empire’ to see what I’m talking about, which maps out a thousand years of ‘Hey, Visigoths, get off my land.’ In fact, there was a thing on the BBC website the other day about they recently found a Roman battlefield. They knew of the battle because it had been written about in Julius Caesar’s time…

JW: “Where did they find the battlefield?”

BC: “I think in the Netherlands. So now because of satellite mapping they can see things they have never found before. So they know where this is where the battle took place…essentially what happened was, the Romans tended to operate on temperate climates. So basically their empire was spread through the Mediterrean up through England, because the weather was dealable and they let all the ‘crazy’ people live up north where it was cold. Occassionally when they would get out of control or they [the Roman Empire] didn’t like what they were doing, they said ‘Get in line!’ and it would go back and forth. Well there was a situation when somebody up there got a little too out of hand and they went up, the Romans sent a bunch of stuff up there and they [the Tencteri and Usipetes tribestribes] said, ‘Okay, we’re going to surrender, we give up. You’re right.’ Julius Caesar ordered them all killed. They wiped out between 150,000 and 200,000 people. Imagine what that was like 2,000 years ago. My point is that history dictates he or she who has the leverage is going to use it. A PC (politically correct) argument is not going to get someone to stop when its in their self interest, their tribal self interest, to wipe you out. It’s a human condition, which you could argue is hardwired in the human animal brain. I’m not here to argue for or against but if you take as a precept and history seems to dictate that, well, we have never not done that.

Billy Corgan Compares Political Correctness To Julius Caesar & The Roman Empire

Late last year we reported Chicago television personality and spiritual author Jennifer Weigel would have a conversation with Billy Corgan as a part of her series on conversation with significant cultural figures and spirituality. The interview took place December 15th and as Weigel personally responded to me with, the interview would be up this week and finally has surfaced. A two hour event, the first hour mainly consisting of Corgan and Weigel covering a number of different but inter-related topics, including but not limited to Donald Trump, social media, Corgan’s creative process, American and international politics, Corgan’s spiritual influences and much more. The second hour consisted of a dialogue with audience members. Below, we include selected portions of the conversation divided into multiple parts by topic, transcribed exclusively here at Alternative Nation. (All citations are my own)

What Guru Do You Relate With?

JW: “Speaking of gurus and spiritual masters, is there a particular person you’ve read recently that you really resonated with? Whether it be someone decades or thousands of years ago or current?”

BC: “Lately I’ve been reading a lot of Hare Krishna related literature and in the magicaly things that happen when you cast [the question], ‘Is there something here for me to read or understand?’ I wrote my ex-girlfriend a letter, a man who actually grew up in Highland Park just up the road where I live, Radhanath Swami  I think is his spiritual name, unbeknown to me he was actually giving a lecture in Highland Park and I had no idea. Anyway I bought a book by him [The Journey Home: Autobiography of an American Swami] about  how he became a wandering sadhu in India at the age of 19. Which as you can imagine at the time is pretty unusual. 19 year old kid runs around through the forest with loincloth and a beggar’s bowl. Anyway, so he became a Hare Krishna devotee and I wrote her this letter of things I wanted to address that reading this book made me think we needed to clear the air, more for mine than hers. She wrote back saying, ‘It’s so funny I’m reading the exact same book.’ [audience laughs] It’s pretty good, and she lives in Australia so, it’s pretty good…Again, truth [according to] the Hare Krishna doctrine, or the Vedic idea, is pantheistic to the sense they believe there is only one god and all the other deities, whether it’s Ganesh or Rama, whoever are expressions of God. So there is nothing that I read as someone who was raised Catholic…in the Vedic religion that is at odds with whether or not I believe in Jesus Christ. Because under that thinking there’s many masters and they’re all leading you to the same Valhalla [word unclear].

Who in the World Has it Right?

JW: “As you were raised Cathoic, you’re a fan of Jesus Christ but also Buddha and a lot of leaders…”

BC: “And the Beatles!” [audience laughs]

JW: “And the Beatles and David Bowie! With that in mind and seeing how so many people mess up and kill over religion, does it make you scared or do you just want to move to Canada? I mean right now, who do you think is doing it right? Where, if anywhere, on the globe, if you could choose anywhere? Because I mean I remember we had a conversation and you were like, ‘I’m moving to France!’ and that was before the Paris Attacks. Where do you think they got it right?”

BC: “Nowhere. I think we’ve entered an age where this is a global issue. If you believe in the conspiracy end of it which is there is a conscious move of the ‘robber barons’ of the world, the gross capitalists, to turn our world into one big shopping mall…so if you believe in the conspiracy we are being moved some would say quite deliberately into a global system, especially with recent treaties like the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnersihp or [The Paris Agreement] …if you believe in these ideas than this is the manifestation of the global conversation. Which is obviously at odds with the American hegemony that we sort of dictate how it all rolls. So going back to a spiritual tangent, this is not about trigger words and safe spaces. This is about who calls the shots and whether the tribal nature of humanity [sic].

For example: ‘I’m a proto-lesbian feminist dadada…’ or ‘I’m a French nationalist’ or ‘I am from Chicago’…if you believe in tribalism which is very much beyond race and is more a culture of choice, though some would argue with that. Then what you’re saying is that people are willingly going to set aside their tribal loyalty to get out of the way for someone they don’t know, who has a different belief system or system of justice or whatever. Now it’s easier to put if you’re a fan of the Philadelphia Eagles and you can undestand why someone fronts up on somebody for wearing their jersey and their team is ‘better than yours,’ well is it going to be any different when the guy from Kurdistan thinks his way of life is better than yours? So from the spiritual quotient it’s going to be: ‘how do we align in a way that is progressive and not destructive?’ Because generally when humanity comes across these criss-cross points of ‘my way or your way’, it gets violent. One only needs Gibbons’ ‘History of the Roman Empire’ to see what I’m talking about, which maps out a thousand years of ‘Hey, Visigoths, get off my land.’ In fact, there was a thing on the BBC website the other day about they recently found a Roman battlefield. They knew of the battle because it had been written about in Julius Caesar’s time…

JW: “Where did they find the battlefield?”

BC: “I think in the Netherlands. So now because of satellite mapping they can see things they have never found before. So they know where this is where the battle took place…essentially what happened was, the Romans tended to operate on temperate climates. So basically their empire was spread through the Mediterrean up through England, because the weather was dealable and they let all the ‘crazy’ people live up north where it was cold. Occassionally when they would get out of control or they [the Roman Empire] didn’t like what they were doing, they said ‘Get in line!’ and it would go back and forth. Well there was a situation when somebody up there got a little too out of hand and they went up, the Romans sent a bunch of stuff up there and they [the Tencteri and Usipetes tribestribes] said, ‘Okay, we’re going to surrender, we give up. You’re right.’ Julius Caesar ordered them all killed. They wiped out between 150,000 and 200,000 people. Imagine what that was like 2,000 years ago. My point is that history dictates he or she who has the leverage is going to use it. A PC (politically correct) argument is not going to get someone to stop when its in their self interest, their tribal self interest, to wipe you out. It’s a human condition, which you could argue is hardwired in the human animal brain. I’m not here to argue for or against but if you take as a precept and history seems to dictate that, well, we have never not done that.

Billy Corgan’s Book ‘God is Everywhere, From Here To There’ Is Over 1,000 Pages Long

Late last year we reported Chicago television personality and spiritual author Jennifer Weigel would have a conversation with Billy Corgan as a part of her series on conversation with significant cultural figures and spirituality. The interview took place December 15th and as Weigel personally responded to me with, the interview would be up this week and finally has surfaced. A two hour event, the first hour mainly consisting of Corgan and Weigel covering a number of different but inter-related topics, including but not limited to Donald Trump, social media, Corgan’s creative process, American and international politics, Corgan’s spiritual influences and much more. The second hour consisted of a dialogue with audience members. Below, we include selected portions of the conversation divided into multiple parts by topic, transcribed exclusively here at Alternative Nation. (All citations are my own)

Billy’s Books

JW: “How’s your book coming?”

BC: “Slow.”

JW: “What, you got like five books worth of stuff? [Corgan nods yes] Why don’t you do volumes? I mean, does it have to be all in one?…”

BC: “I can’t talk about in that way right now, but yeah right now it turns out to be about a thousand pages.”

JW: “What’s it called now, has it changed?”

BC: “The current title is God is Everywhere, From Here To There.”

JW: “Now it’s a memoir but you’re changing the names to protect the not-so-innocent?”

BC: “Yeah, no real names, I’ve talked about that in interviews. I mean yes, the average person will be able to go, ‘Oh yeah that’s so-and-so.’ But it’s not meant to be a legal device, it’s meant to get you out of what you think you know and take you hopefully in the very interpersonal experience which I experienced. Which, I would argue, is mythology. Most of what I have experienced in my life isn’t real.”

Corgan once a website with a very similar to the same tentative title as his book, Everything from Here to There. Below is the welcome letter, as the domain is long extinct and inactive:

Hello, many blessings to you for visiting Everything From Here to There.

The purpose of this website is to discuss openly and without fear concepts of Mind-Body-Soul integration. If you are drawn to the Hidden Truths, drawn to God as something beyond limitation, and drawn to Love as the greatest force in the Universe, then you have come to the right place at the right time. This is a place of Love.

In discussing Mind-Body-Soul integration within the context of holistic Truth, many topics will be explored here that may be new to you. Like any good tree that one would hope to grow, we must set our roots deep into the ground so that what is real will prosper in the Light of Love.

This site is non-denominational, we promote no religion, and if we speak of any belief or faith system it won’t be at the expense of another. That is not to avoid the obvious. Most of the citizens of this planet put their faith in someone or something. This website respects every belief and every faith as an expression of God’s greater Will.

This is not a place of judgment, nor a place of making proof. We begin with the idea that there is a God. We begin with the undying belief that there is a unifying intelligence that manifests itself in Every-thing. Even if you don’t believe in God, exploring fully the idea of a God or Gods should pose no threat to you. The idea of a higher collective intelligence or consistent organizing principle should be worth contemplating no matter what you believe in (or don’t believe in). For who is God if not Us?

Mind-Body-Soul integration is the primary focus of this site, and how it can best manifest in our daily life. We will strive to celebrate the brilliant Spirit in each individual and work collectively to glorify that which is Holy in each and every one of us. To honor and recognize that support for another is also support for ourselves. To kindle the flame in every heart humbly as gratitude for our opportunity here to make a subtle yet important difference. It is that simple.

The date of origination for Everything From Here to There is 9.9.09, a perfect date to mark this beginning of a wonderful opportunity. We swing the garden gate open, and ALL are welcome Here.

William Patrick Corgan”

Billy Corgan Wants To ‘Find Peace’ With Original Smashing Pumpkins Members

We have been busy transcribing a lengthy interview of Billy Corgan with Jennifer Weigel. We have released transcriptions regarding Donald Trump and Corgan’s views on social media and humanity’s future. These transcriptions so far have been based off of video recordings from a 9 part series released by Big Media Productions on YouTube, but we also found access to the entire two hour interview, with audience participation. Unfortunately, the audio quality of the full interview is poor and some sentences are just invariably lost to audible gargle. Here, we found a bit of Corgan speaking about the possibility of a full band reunion with James Iha and D’arcy Wretzky, Chamberlin included.

JW: “Do you think it’s time for a reunion, with the originals?”

BC: “Are you really asking me this question?”

JW: “I think it makes personally…but everyone wants to know that for some reason. I know that’s so not who we are now. I guess the question would be, would it make sense to sit down and have tea with either of them [Iha or Wretzky]? Because you spent so much time together, would you like to know who they are now?”

BC: “I know who they are…and they know who I am. When you spend that amount of time with somebody, of course they matured…I think the only way to answer every one of these questions is…I have no interest in doing anything that’s inorganic. I have people in my band now that I talk to…and they don’t want to talk to me and I don’t want to talk to them. If they try were lying on the side of the road, I would stop my car and bring them to the hospital, but we don’t send Christmas cards to each other. There’s no relationship. And so when you’re talking about the natural human instinct to find forgiveness and heal a relationship, I think that never ends. That’s a human thing, it has nothing to do with the band or people creating memories. The business of it all, I find quite gross…I think people rarely get out of those things [original reunions] what they think they’re gonna get. Because when a relationship breaks, and I would take it back more to something you’ve experienced in your family life or your romantic life, whatever, when a relationship breaks there are times it’s not gonna get any better. It’s what it was for what it was, underneath a particular set of circumstances…[inaudible]…There’s no temptation there for me. Strickly on my part I think it’s like, “Would I like to find peace?” Absolutely, of course. But beyond all the other stuff…I can’t even imagine that being able to watch.

Corgan also spoke on various aspects of the band’s past and his relationships to the music industry and audiences:

BC: “I didn’t get into this business I got into…to scream in an empty alleyway. I didn’t design this world [music industry], someone else designed it for me. They gave me a number and said, ‘Okay, now go stand over there.’ Now my natural, Eastern European gypsy spirit wants to kick everyone in the head in response, but it’s not an effective strategy anymore.”

BC: “Like when people would see us back in the day, they wouldn’t understand the combatant nature of the band or my verbal tirades and stuff like that. They didn’t understand it was performance art. We were purposefully pressing buttons being in a generation where they had it all figured out. When you try to engage someone with a different point of view, someone who assumes you align with them socially…and the minute they realize you’re not on their team or determine you’re not in their tribe, how quickly they turn. Generation X in particular led an incredible betrayal of values. The sellout, which was the word at the time, really is…the word of the generation. There has been far more selling out than buying in.”

Corgan has come a long way with this. Since the dissolution of the original lineup, there has been little talk between ex-bandmates outside of Chamberlin. But here, he shows a desire to make peace with them, which doesn’t equal a reunion. It means closure with people who were once part of his life and band, which is something a lot more important than a “reunion.” People will inevitably continue to criticize Corgan for anything he says. But the fact of the matter is, Corgan, Iha and Wretzky are human, not machines who play music for drooling middle aged people. Healing takes time. Respect that.

Billy Corgan Says Facebook Is Creating A Generation Of Narcissists & Twitter ‘Didn’t Do Sh*t For Me’

Late last year we reported Chicago television personality and spiritual author Jennifer Weigel would have a conversation with Billy Corgan as a part of her series on conversation with significant cultural figures and spirituality. The interview took place December 15th and as Weigel personally responded to me with, the interview would be up this week and finally has surfaced. A two hour event, the first hour mainly consisting of Corgan and Weigel covering a number of different but inter-related topics, including but not limited to Donald Trump, social media, Corgan’s creative process, American and international politics, Corgan’s spiritual influences and much more. The second hour consisted of a dialogue with audience members. Below, we include selected portions of the conversation divided into multiple parts by topic, transcribed exclusively here at Alternative Nation. (All citations are my own)

Social Media and Twitter

JW: “Why did you quit Twitter?”

BC: “Can I put this in Chicago language? Twitter wasn’t doing shit for me. Actually, somebody from Twitter called me and they wanted to know what happened, and I told them basically that in more kind language. It’s pretty obvious to me, and if anyone is interested there’s plenty of information coming out with what the social media oligarchs are now doing. Whether it’s Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, it won’t matter. The names will change, the faces will change, but the same construct. Look no further than what Facebook is doing to magazines and newspapers. Their click rates are down 60 to 80 percent. I think I read TIME’s sales went down 60% in the last year…”

JW: “You’ve talked about how we’re creating a generation of narcissists because of Facebook…”

BC: “We’ve already created a generation of narcissists, that ship has sailed. Look no further than trying to have a conversation with a millenial to know what I’m talking about…”

JW: “Between the selfie stick and the texting, I was at dinner with four of them [Millenials] and nobody was looking at me. I was like, ‘So when we go to Mars later, can I park in front?’ Nobody cared. Nobody noticed. It’s the world, so how do you adapt to it? You quit Twitter and then what?”

BC: “Let me go back to what I was saying, because I think if we understand these things from a bigger meta point of view, it’s easier to relate to our own experience rather than ‘That’s what I did.’ Very fascinating, and I’ll use an example because I think it’s an easier way to illustrate it all, it’s a slightly different model. MTV starts right? They have nothing. So they have to go to all the labels and say, ‘Look, we wanna play all your videos. We can’t afford to pay for the content, we can’t afford to pay you per minute what we would for real content, like a show. So give us this free content and we’ll promote your things.’ Eventually, as everyone knows, MTV got so out of hand, they crushed the labels. [MTV] ran their business model into the ground and basically turned MTV into a normal network, off the backs of the musical artists, Janet Jackson or whoever. They made gazillions off of all these people and still pretend to be a music network of which of course, they’re nothing like it. They’re more like a social…socialist [sic] construct. ‘Fourteen and Pregnant’, you know?

But the point is, they cried ‘poor!’ in the beginning, they clung onto somebody else’s heat, in a wrestling term and eventually shot the people in the head who made them. It’s what Facebook and Twitter are all going to do now. Facebook is a little bit different because of the way it is set up, they have a better thing in the marketplace. I think people like me are waking up to where Twitter is weak against what, let’s call ‘celebrities,’ bring to Twitter, I think we’re going to start seeing a mass exodus. What a Kim Kardashian brings to a Twitter is worth more than four hundred people with the same amount of followers. So they take what a Kim Kardashian brings to a Twitter. Now in Kim Kardashian’s case, she can turn that and sell cosmetics or a clothing branding or whatever. But for people in the middle, I would put people like us [Weigel and Corgan] in the middle, we don’t get that same exchange. We can’t turn around and get a shoe deal because we are tweeting something. So in essence, Twitter and other social media platfroms take and take from something that I build. My name, my music, my whatever and they say, ‘Thanks a lot!’ Jimmy Chamberlin and I when we brought the Pumpkins back in 2007, we sat down one day and did the calculus and we realized for every hundred people we had on Facebook, we sold one record. So we were catering to 99 people to sell one thing. That is a weakly poor business exchange.”

JW: “Don’t you think the business model has changed since 2007 though?”

BC: “No, no and this is the last thing I’ll say about it because it can get real boring real fast…”

Audience member: “No we like it! This is wonderful.”

BC: [Corgan smiles] “Alright, I’ll carry on. Smashing Pumpkins currently have four million likes on Facebook. So, if you’re checking my site everyday and I post something like, ‘Hey, I took my dog for a walk’ and a little picture, you’ll see it but the other 3.99 million people [sic] won’t because they’re not visiting it everyday. So what Facebook wants you to do is ‘boost your posts’ or, this is where we get into Dumbland, do really dumb stuff. So that you click on it and you click on it and you click on it, so then it goes viral. So you create a culture where idiocy reigns and rules, not quality. [audience applauds] I’m not saying anything radical! So you’re creating a social ecosystem that rewards being inane.”

JW: “So, the counter of that is knowing a lot of comedians that use Twitter and Facebook to their advantage, if they are funny, which is their world, it goes viral and that’s their business, so maybe for them it’s not so bad.”

BC: “I would jump on you right there and argue that because of the social knob construct on Facebook, how many comedians on Facebook are saying what they would really say, in the world Richard Pryor grew up in? I learned as a white kid growing up in suburbs, I had a lot of exposure because of my father being a musician to other cultures and other points of view, but I learned from Richard Pryor that made me look at my world and say, ‘Huh, he’s got a point.’ These people I am growing up with are either outward racists or closet racists. His comedy, his social thinking, his brilliance made me look at my own race, white people, differently. But if people can’t have open conversations…if you have people like Jerry Seinfeld come out and saying, ‘It’s not worth playing at colleges anymore because social justice warriors will be all over you the moment you step out of line. So you’re right about a comedian using Facebook or a musician using Facebook, but I guarantee you the minute they put something up that doesn’t align with the social justice mob mentality, the risk is too high. So you have a watering down of diversity and homogenizing of general messaging. That, as an artist, is death.”

Government and Social Media

BC: “They [Facebook] are too tied into big government. The government is literally in league with these big social media companies becasuse they are mining the data! Why do you think Mark Zuckerberg learned Chinese? Whatever happened to this talk about ‘the government this’ and ‘the press that,’ that’s all gone out the window. Again, money rules, power rules. It’s not going to change, which is why I go back to my earlier point. When Tribe One meets Tribe Two meets Tribe Three, is everyone gonna go, ‘Hey, high five! I saw your documentary’, you know? I doubt it. I’m cynical in that regard. Don’t be fooled by things that are cuddly and fuzzy. The social media construct is cuddly and fuzzy for a reason. You want the most amount of people for the most amount of time. If you’re engaged in a debate [sic], inflaming rheotric about the candidate they don’t like, that only serves a bigger master. It has nothing to do with democracy. True democracy is uncomfortable. This is not uncomfortable. Look no further than some post from the New York Times and read the comments. Go on Breitbart and read the comments. It’s all right there, it’s all you need.”

Media and the Truth

JW: “So speaking of the New York Times, we talked about creating our own news website because the news that you get, having been in the news business for a long time, it’s filtered, it’s watered down, it’s the opinion of the writer, the editor, you’re not getting real news…”

BC: “May I ask you a question? [Weigel responds yes] If you look at the mainstream news, a very general question, you like I do open the paper or watch a major network, how much of that do you view as propaganda?”

JW: “Ninety percent.”

BC: “Same number for me: ninety percent. We come in media from diametrically opposed points of view. You grew up in a media family with your father? You have two people here who have been in public life for a very long time. Ninety percent [of news] is propaganda. Now the great thing is, and I assume most people here, already know that. So they are reading the news with a different level of discernment. But isn’t it interesting that those who are already propagandized, not only are not stopping the propaganda but are actually turning up the volume. Hence, so and so blasts so and so. So and so rips so and so. Because you have to double down on that rheotric.”

JW: “So now my question to you is since we didn’t start our own news network, though we’re still willing to do it if anyone out there is willing to fund it, we’re totally game for a conversation…a real network that gives real information and not ninety percent propaganda. What is your daily routine in the morning when you get up? What are the websites you go to, what do you do?”

BC: “I find that I read the mainstream websites because I want to see, basically what are the marching orders. It is pretty interesting to see the White House press a button and how the mainstream media verbatim with very little questioning factor that propaganda out. Maybe less in the past year but still pretty hot [sic], in the way the White House can dictate the conversation. Drudge is good but obviously he is right leaning and/or libertarian. I tried for awhile to read more leftist stuff…but I don’t know… I’m at a point now, I don’t know if if it’s the Salons of the world, I just can’t read it. Because I feel my intelligence is being insulted. Maybe that’s just where I am politically in my life, I just can’t have my intelligence insulted.”

Avengers of Truth or Brainwashed Robots

BC: “Being an ‘avenger for the truth’ is kind of a waste of time.”

JW: “Because they’re gonna put their head in the sand anyway?”

BC: “Yes, and you have to try to respect they want to be that way.”

JW: “No! If that was the case, people would still be segregated in cafeterias. If Rosa Parks hadn’t sat on the bus…I can’t live with that way, no way Jose. If you put your head in the sand, that pisses me off. It really pisses me off.”

BC: “I’m just playing contrarian.I don’t necessarily disagree with you. Going back into the social justice thing…I mean Melissa Harris Perry, you know, who is the gift that keeps on giving on MSNBC, literally got into a discussion yesterday about Darth Vader being black, but how he’s a good guy, when the mask is off, he’s white. Now I’m just paraphrasing, I just watched the clip. I try not to just read, not read what’s written. I tried to watch the clip – when you’re down into ‘Why is Darth Vader black?’…you know what I mean? I just can’t roll with that. I can’t roll with that…”

JW: “If we keeping playing the lowest common denominator, we’re gonna raise morons and no one is gonna get anywhere.”

BC: “But we seem to do a plenty good job about raising morons [audience laughs] social justice warriors or not. My point is, if something is ineffective, if the world doesn’t reflect the world that you think it should, in the way you think it should, you’re probably doing something wrong. It’s very easy to attack the human condition, but life is very hard, life is very difficult. I have a lot more empathy than when I did as a young man from what my family went through.”

JW: “Now is that from maturity or age or…?”

BC: “No, it’s realizing their lives were fucking hard. Whether it was disease or insanity or cataracts or whatever, their lives were fucking hard and I’m willing to guess many people here know what I’m talking about. Families struggle, people struggle, it’s like one of those John Steinbeck novels where the mountain seems too high for most people…they have the courage but they don’t have the strength or stamina…and now more than ever you have incredible detours to take you off the march up the hill. There’s no end to things you can click on. And now come the sex robots, that’s the new thing that’s starting to trend…there’s a growing discussion about robotics, one is the sexual application because there’s obviously a lot of money there and and morality of all that…and the other side is the militarization of robots. The third discussion is how robots are gonna replace, you know the people standing in front of McDonalds saying they want higher wages, McDonalds is just gonna put in robot hamburger makers, they already have them. That’s the end of that discussion. So, back to the sex robots… [audience laughs] Sorry that sounded like such a good line to say, I didn’t know where I was going with that…No what I’m saying is you’re quickly giving into this dystopic type of Charlton Heston in [The] Omega Man, where it’s you and all you got is this little cubicle, it’s green and shitty, so why not have a sex robot when a real human is only gonna disappoint you and all that stuff. These are…tectonic shifts in not only the way we live but the way we face our fear because anyone who has watched Lord of The Rings or any spiritual books or any of Jen’s [Weigel] books, that at some point of the crisis of the hero’s journey, the hero, he or she must face the thing they don’t want to face.”

 

 

 

Billy Corgan On If He Believes Donald Trump Is Racist

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Late last year we reported Chicago television personality and spiritual author Jennifer Weigel would have a conversation with Billy Corgan as a part of her series on conversation with significant cultural figures and spirituality. The interview took place December 15th and as Weigel personally responded to me with, the interview would be up this week and finally has surfaced. A two hour event, the first hour mainly consisting of Corgan and Weigel covering a number of different but inter-related topics, including but not limited to Donald Trump, social media, Corgan’s creative process, American and international politics, Corgan’s spiritual influences and much more. The second hour consisted of a dialogue with audience members. Below, we include selected portions of the conversation divided into multiple parts by topic, transcribed exclusively here at Alternative Nation. (All citations are my own)

What Puts You in a Creative Mindset?

BC: “I’ve said many times I’m a whore when it comes to creativity.”

JW: “You’re whore? So, you’ll take it when you can get it?”

BC: “No I have some ethics, but… [all laugh] probably not the best way to start. I think creativity…”

JW: “There’s the tweet: Billy’s a whore.”

BC: “There’s nothing new there…[all laugh] I think creativity is really about oppurtunity and whatever you attach to it is ultimately going to be an impediment. So you’re standing in line at the 7/11 and you have a really great idea and you don’t think it’s important enough to write down or stop what you’re doing, you’re kind of sending a signal up to the universe where your priorities are. For example, the opening riff to “Cherub Rock” on Siamese Dream came to me driving down Irving Park Road [Chicago, Ill.] heading east…and to where we were at the time, I was passenger, and where I had to get was about 25 minutes…and this is an era before cell phones. So I had to tell my friend, ‘Don’t say anything,’ because I felt something significant was happening and I didn’t know what it was, and I literally sat in the car for 25 minutes and went [hums the opening riff to Siamese Dream] …because I was so scared I was going to lose this little lightning bolt. So I think if you start with the premise that God is perfect without any asterisk or exception, and inspiration or at least the sense of inspiration is our way of reflecting the creator, if you believe in that kind of organization, then anything that comes between you and something that is pure or feels pure, is your own BS. So when you say something like, “I like to be near water to be creative”, that might be a preference, but if at some point you think, ‘Here I am standing in the desert, how am I going to write this chapter?’, that’s you, that’s not divinity.”

Donald Trump

JW: “So how do you explain Donald Trump?”

BC: “Well, without getting into the politik of it because it is a time unlike any that I remember. Of course, I can read about the late ’60s and early ’70s, I was very small, but the ’30s in Germany or any kind of tumultuous time in history, and certainly there’s hundreds of examples going back…I tend to look at those things through the prism of ‘people rise to the fore to express an unconscious desire.’ So when people say for example, ‘Well Donald Trump is the face of the angry white man who is frustrated by the process,’ [sic] I think, ‘Okay, so what?’ As is any version of…. [e.g.] Gloria Steinem represented something about women’s liberation…people rise to the fore as symbols. Having at times, and in particular one particular time being a symbol myself, you start to understand there’s an unconscious process at work with the public far larger than the personality. So the question isn’t so much who Donald Trump is but the world that made Donald Trump and then by what particular prism you see a Donald Trump. Let me take someone who is a little less of a political flashpoint at the moment, who is generally considered the second person behind Trump, which is [Ted] Cruz. I remember watching Cruz on the floor of the Senate filibustering what would later become Obamacare. I think he filibustered for 26 hours. If you look at the microcosm of press that went around the event, he was reviled, was an ‘idiot,’ ‘how could he do such a stupid thing,’ ‘this is gonna haunt the Republicans.’

Yet here’s the guy only a few years later in contention to be the President. So maybe something he represented maybe is more important to people that what he actually did. So when you get into the public mind, it’s more about symbolic representation. Which is why oftentimes when you see Trump supporters questioned by mainstream media they say, ‘I don’t give a shit about whether he’s right or wrong, it’s what he represents,’ and so he’s giving voice to that. So you could spend all day looking at the personality but you’re actually looking at the wrong direction. Look who would’ve been considered politically appropriate another time, would be considered a total racist today. As the great producer Flood once said, ‘One man’s meat is another man’s snare drum.’ What sounds like a snare drum to one person sounds like a thudding piece of meat to another. So it’s all in the eye of the beholder. So I tend to look at those things through the prism of the imaginations of public discourse and the unexpressed desires because no person, no human that I know, unless they are a guru or spiritual master who has dedicated themselves to spiritual practice, nobody I know can actually embody the projection.

Stay tuned for more installments of this interview!

 

Watch Smashing Pumpkins’ Jeff Schroeder Jam With The Yamaha Revstar

In a new promotional campaign for Yamaha, Jeff Schroeder of the Smashing Pumpkins  participated in a series of videos entitled “I Play Yamaha”, in which noted guitarists who play Yamaha express their interest and satisfaction with the instrument.

“At a Smashing Pumpkins show, I would have to play everything from really heavy to really clean and beautiful. So finding one guitar that could cover all that sonic territory can be difficult but this guitar in particular, [the Yamaha Revstar] with its classic two Humbucker orientation that recalls a lot of other instruments but it’s versatile. There are some things about it that make my life a lot easier. It’s so much easier to get to the higher frets, the neck is a bit more modern but has a classic feel…it’s proven to be able to hold up in a bunch of different situations, musical situations. Yamaha in particular has such a high musical integrity, their pursuits in equipment development, gear development and guitar development are very much based on musical decisions.”

Jeff Schroeder was recently featured in a track by Texas noise/shoegaze/awesome trio Ringo Deathstarr, “Guilt” off of their new album Pure Mood.

Schroeder was been in the Pumpkins for almost 10 years and we are expecting a new album just around the corner! Though with the birth of Augustus Juppiter, the process of release may be held up a little bit.  I can only hope it features highlights of Schroeder’s guitar work because he is really an incredible, incredible guitarist. Just look at him shred here:

Additionally, if appeased by the sound of “Guilt”, check out Ringo Deathstarr’s new album and our interview with them. Very friendly people.

Billy Corgan Announces The Birth Of His Son, Augustus Juppiter

After much speculation and rumors: the Pumpkin King welcomes his heir into the world. On November 16th, 2015, Corgan’s girlfriend Chloe Mendel, closely associated with the Madame Zuzu’s teahouse in Chicago gave birth to their first son, Augustus Juppiter. These last couple months, fans who met the couple at Madame Zuzu’s had noticed Mendel to look pregnant. Corgan has been quiet these last couple of weeks outside of his eulogy to Scott Weiland and now it all makes sense. So far, not much detail has been given about the new family but they seem very happy with one another and Corgan and Mendel have been dating for around 2 years.

We at Alternative Nation are extremely elated to see Corgan enter a new chapter of his life as a father and for the start of Mendel’s journey as a mother. There is no true parallel in life than having a child and Corgan has expressed interest in having children for sometime. This year has seen a certain transformation for Corgan, his reunion with Chamberlin, the launch of People and Their Cars, a successful summer tour, but the welcoming of this child into the world takes the cake over everything else.

Corgan has often played the father figure in life, both personal and professional. In his youth, he frequently acted as the caretaker for his two younger brothers, as they were shot around Chicago between relatives in the midst of divorce. When the Pumpkins went through like James and D’arcy’s breakup, to Chamberlin’s initial firing and the revival of the band, Corgan was there taking care of business where no one else could. Not to mention, his dedication to his lovable cats over the years. There could not be better news surrounding Corgan. Augustus Juppiter, welcome to the world.

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Interview: Ringo Deathstarr Discuss New Album, Smashing Pumpkins and World Tour

Special thanks to Daniel Coborn

I can’t lie, I’m a bit stubborn and it’s hard for me to get into new music. I’m a bit fixed in my taste but when I discover new music I like, I like to enjoy a close relationship with it and try to get as close to the music as I can. A band I’ve been coming back to again and again lately has been Ringo Deathstarr,a spacey genre bending power trio of G.G. Alex, Daniel Coborn and Elliott Frazier. They’re kooky – it’s hard to believe they’re from Austin, Texas when it sounds like they’re from planet Cerubon 41-2 from the Bunoti galaxy. Slow and explosive but quick with dreamy harmonies, they continue with the legacy of bands like My Bloody Valentine but at the same time do not blatantly rip them off, which I see as being more commonplace nowadays from many “shoegaze revival” movements. With a new name like Ringo Deathstarr, expect the Good Vibes Express headed to a station near you. I had the pleasure of interviewing the guys and talking to them the last couple weeks. Originally it was to be in person at Fun Fun Fun Fest, but it didn’t work out because of transit issues. Below, enjoy our brief interview with Ringo Deathstarr as they just are recovering from touring:

How was your Fun Fun Fun Fest experience?
Seems like a long time ago now, but it was a great festival, as usual–we had to play first in the early morning sun but there was a good turnout and i think we went over well.

Your newest album, Pure Mood, is really neat. I’ve been listening it and really struck me as different from much of the “shoegaze revival” stuff I’ve been hearing this last year or so (excuse the labeling). Is there a particular influence, set of gear or happenstance that distinguishes your album for your past works, instrumentally?
It’s just a bit harder, maybe a bit grungier. We spent a lot more time on the recording and most of the songs were written beforehand so that helped in creating a flow, or something.

I’m bad with discerning lyrics – any particular themes or messages you were exploring on this album?We all wrote lyrics–no particular themes other than the usual–life, love, existential anxiety.

Could you expand on the term “existential anxiety?”
Death, the after life, the infinitely large universe and my relation to it.

We’ve noticed your relationship with the Smashing Pumpkins, especially with guitarist Jeff Schroeder. Was the band an influence growing up?
Of course, and touring with them in 2011 helped out in lots of ways.

Schroeder featured on a track from Pure Mood, “Guilt“. What is the Schroeder collaboration process like?
Send Jeff the tracks, let him do his thing, edit it in… Easy!

How did your initial tour dates with the Pumpkins go?
It was a dream come true, but I wish we could do it again, cause we are a lot better as players now.

How is your European tour going?
The euro tour was insane. We drove all over the continent in a rented station wagon playing in venues of all sizes. We drank lots of free beer, and kicked several asses.

In light of recent political and world events, namely the attacks in Paris, did this stop you from touring around Europe at all?
No way.  We played in Paris the week after the attacks with Protomartyr. It was a really beautiful thing to be a part of.

Any nice sights or sounds you’ve experienced out in Europe?
We saw a really cool cruise ship performance on an overnight ferry from Stavanger, Norway to Copenhagen, Denmark that redefined our belief systems about what it means to be cool.

What’s on the horizon?
US tour in February and back to Europe in March. Then new tunes.

I’d love to hear a holiday release from you guys. The shoegaze and alt-rock influences plus Christmas music, sounds like a tasty mix. What do you all do for the holidays?
Sounds like it could be fun. We all do normal family stuff, though.  You know, church, egg nog, watching scrooged.

Are any of you all involved in other musical and/or artistic projects? I know me personally and maybe some of our readers would like to check that stuff out.
None of us actively play in other bands but Elliott does some studio work, producing bands and the like. Check out the band from Austin, blxpltn! He produced their last record [Black Cop Down] and their upcoming one it kicks ass.

You guys will be headed to Japan very soon – excited? Do you guys have a following out there? [Note, this question was asked before the Japanese leg was completed]
Japan is our best place to play. The people there treat us like Nirvana.  We are friends with super famous Japanese rock star Sugizo.  Our record label rules.  It’s hard to explain how much it rules over there.  I pretty much live my life waiting for the next time we can go over.

How much rock and roll do your souls collectively contain?

666%.

Good answer.

Ringo Deathstarr is slated to come back to the United States in February before returning to Europe in March. The new tour dates will be announced soon. For more updates, follow their Facebook or Twitter and expect more news of them in the following months. Look for their new album Pure Mood on iTunes and other online streaming services and marketplaces, as well as record stores.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Chamberlin Talks Smashing Pumpkins’ 2016 Plans

Jimmy Chamberlin was recently interviewed by the Talk Music with Scott Cowie podcast just a few days ago in an interview spanning about 25 minutes. Chamberlin talked deeply and extensively on his drum kit and history, first time seeing the Pumpkins, his future with the band, the Chicago music scene, Cream drummer Ginger Baker and more! The interview was very long though definitely 100% worth the listen, but some parts became awkward to transcribe out of context. For the full interview, it begins around 8:43. Alternative Nation has transcribed some key quotes.

On his historical drum kit

That configuration was just an easier way to play “I Am One”, before that I was having to play paradiddle on my sixteen inch floor tom and then move my hand back to the snare drum. So the only way that configuration could work was as a paradiddle and then I thought, “Well shit, I’m just gonna put a fourteen over here and then my kit will be like a four piece kit and the toms will be more like supplemental toms. So I look at it like snare, fourteen, sixteen, eighteen, almost like a [John] Bonham type kit and then with two smaller toms in the middle. It just kinda stuck and I noticed there was new melodic opportunities with that configuration and people kept asking me about it, so I figured if people kept asking me about it, that I would just hang out to it.

First time seeing the Pumpkins

The first time I saw them… was not the time I heard them because I had gotten a demo tape from a friend of Billy and I’s before that. So, I had heard the songs and when I went to see them, they were playing: James, D’arcy and Billy with a drum machine. The idea was to bring me in, from my side of the fence and the Pumpkins’ side of the fence, to bring me in to play this iconic venue out in Chicago called the Cabaret Metro, which I wanted to play at and the band wanted to play at. So they brought me in because Joe Shanahan, one of my best friends, would not allow bands to play on that stage without a drummer [laughs] He was a bit of a purist when it came to that stuff. I mean obviously some bands did do that [play without a drummer] but the Pumpkins, I think Joe really liked the Pumpkins and was trying to guide them into a heavier sound.

First impressions of the Pumpkins

I thought they were okay, it wasn’t really my cup of tea. I wasn’t into the stuff they were playing, so I wasn’t an “REM” fan. The music they were playing before I joined was very jangly rock stuff…very 2/4…I was thinking, “Okay, I can do this stuff in my sleep, but it’s not something that I’m into..and the way I play isn’t really going to be additive. I was listening to Tony Williams and stuff like that and Weather Report. So I wasn’t just gonna come in and start blowing chops all over this guy’s songs but I was certainly more interested in that kinda stuff. So, the first impressions of the band was, “Okay, I can play this stuff and it’s cool and I can play the Metro and I’ll probably be on my way,” but then once Billy and I started talking and started to work on some of the music he wanted to write that was a little bit heavier, then it started to reveal itself as something bigger. Then we started talking about heavier drums…stuff that was built around the drums. Once he heard me play he was like, “Oh, well let’s try this beat and let’s try this,” and we just started rocking out from that point.

What He Thought On the Pumpkins’ Future Potential and Success Starting Out

[laughs jovially] I heard this question a lot. Once you commit to something and are so inside of it, it’s hard to be objective. I mean obviously, I’d say things were happening but were happening at such a slow pace, it’s hard to really quantify kinda what’s going on in your own life. Like now I can look back and say, “Ah holy fuck that was a crazy time” or “Geez, I should’ve seen this coming.” But when you’re in the middle of it, it’s hard to be objective or to have any kind of perspective, you’re just kinda in it. Back then I was just thinking my problems were like, “I got a cracked crash cymbal and I gotta get some drumheads”, right? [laughs] I wasn’t thinking like, “Man, we’re going places.” I was thinking like, “My drums sounds like shit, I gotta get to the drum store,” it was compartmentalized in the moment, as opposed to, “We got some grand plan for world domination and these are the components that are gonna get us there! ‘I Am One’ is gonna launch a thousand ships and we’re gonna do a crazy video, and then people are throw money…”

I mean, you’re never thinking like that… If I were to tell my dad, “I’m gonna start playing drums because I wanna make a lot of money,” my dad would’ve been like, “You’re out of your mind! You’re not gonna make any money playing the drums. In fact, you should go to a hospital right now and have your head examined.” So you never really start off playing because you wanna make money. We were kinda weird looking dudes and some one weird looking girl…we wanted to [inaudible] the opposite sex, that was good enough…and get a little bit of scratch on the side, some pay…Music outside of music is always kind of a bullshit play, right?

So you’re in the studio and you’re making great music, but you never really believe in the peripheral business that’s going on outside of it, right? Because you’re taught as a musician to be very guarded, very insular, very “Hey, I’m not gonna let anyone in on my art because they’re gonna piss all over it,” right? Even after how many years Billy and I have been working together, the twenty seven years or so, we’re like, “We still don’t trust those people!” We were having lunch the other day and I say, “Hey, you should just come to my house and we’ll play some music!” What a novel concept…With Siamese Dream, once I didn’t have to borrow money to eat, or not live in my car, or pay rent, you still don’t believe it but still, you’re getting by. Even later when the checks are rolling in, you’re still thinking like, “How long can I ride this fantasy until, like my dad said, I can get a real job?” [laughs]

Partnership with Billy Corgan and future with the band

“So the other day did you and Billy get to jam at all?”

Not yet no, it takes a long time with us. We’re getting older, so even getting lunch on the books takes a couple weeks but we’ll get together and do some playing soon here, probably after the new year, but you know we did the tour over the summer, we had a lot of fun, it was super easy, low stress. I think the one thing we’ve always known, in spite of the business, the “he said, she said” any of that stuff, when we get together, we make great music, at least we think it’s great and that’s what’s important to us. We have a good time doing it, we are both interested in the same types of components that make music like , “How did we create things that sound simplistic that are really complex on the inside?”, “How do we write things that sound like nursery rhymes from 30,000 feet but once you start to pull the layers away, are extremely complicated, and extremely interconnected?” So I think those things are always gonna be interesting to me and him. I think the stuff he does without me certainly sounds like, you know, not so much of that stuff, and I think the stuff he does with me, we kind of challenge each other to get like: “C’mon man, are we gonna play that change again? I mean, what are you talking about, you know?”

The Snare Drum Used on Gish

So I only used one snare on that record and unfortunately it wasn’t mine. It was Butch’s [Vig] recording custom Yamaha 5 ½ by 14 Steel Shell, which was a great drum…I’ve received checks from lots of people sampling that drum sound…it’s really great, it really set the tone, it set the stage for the expectation around recorded drums at least and really flew Butch up the flagpole as “the guy”, but a lot of that sound came from: A. the way I play, B. the room was very small, very compressed…when we recorded Gish I think everything except for “Snail” was one take…we just rehearsed the heck of it and went in and just cut it…and I think everything was one take, maybe two. But it was just Billy and I in the same room, tracking together, like literally as close as you and I are right now, as close as I am to the monitor, just like right there “we gotta get this super tight, right?” and then we put the other stuff on later, and that’s really how we record all the time. Like him and I, we have to see each other, we gotta know its all live to take, we’ve never used ProTools or click tracks or any of that stuff, we just kind of went for it. Gish set the stage for that stuff.

On Working with Butch Vig

Well it was great, Butch is a drummer, y’know he’s got a great hear for drum sound, he’s got his own opinions about drums, which some of them are good and some of them I don’t agree with, but nevertheless he is a great producer. He’s like a family member, you’re like living in a cave with him for four months, you can’t really not get to know him and really don’t have a choice as far as whether you’re gonna like him or not, neither one of you is going anywhere, but yeah Butch is great. I think it was super, exactly what the band needed at that time.

On Cream Drummer Ginger Baker and His Biodocumentary “Beware of Mr. Baker”, Influences on Zeitgeist

“Ah it’s amazing right? I’ve always been a fan but now I’m a much bigger fan [laughs] When Billy and I did Zeitgeist, we really wanted to find some type of new music, we wanted to find a whole new trip to get into, something that wasn’t rock, something that was really trance-y, like in a Depeche Mode way but more primitive. So we got way into Fela and Femi Kuti, and Ginger and Tony Allen and that stuff, we listened to that stuff all day long when we were making Zeitgeist. Especially for “United States” and those types of songs I was looking for like, “How can I write something that is super fucking compelling and super repetitive that is not gonna get boring over a ten minute thing?”

So you would listen to these Fela [Kuti] songs…and the drums would be doing four different things at the same time and would go on for five minutes before the horns would come in and keyboard would come in, so I really threw myself at the music and tried to figure out, “What are those components?”, besides the fact Tony Allen is a fucking great drummer and those other guys are ridiculously talented. What is it about those choices that they are making that keeps things interesting? Through that I obviously got into the Ginger Baker – Fela stuff and subsequently one of my friends who works at Vice or somebody, he was certainly not a drummer, he was like, “Have you seen this Ginger Baker movie?” and I was like, “Nah, I haven’t seen it” and then I watched it…I mean, Ginger is so good.

I was listening to Cream stuff that the other day. I mean you talk about that Fela stuff, when you listen and you think, “What makes it so interesting?” It’s not what they play, it’s how they play it, how those parts are suggested and the framework they create for themselves. With Ginger, his use of dynamics as a jazz drummer in a rock context, no one was ever playing like that…Nobody but Baker keyed in on the dynamics of that stuff, where he was actually removing stuff to make stuff more powerful, like not having crash cymbals where other guys would just lay down the crash. When you listen to Bonham, you can template where all the crashes will be. But with Baker, you’re always fucking up trying to play his parts because they’re so unconventional. When I’m putting Pumpkins stuff together I’m always thinking, “What can I remove?” What is this process of removal and is what I’m playing still compelling?…

On Future Collaborations

Anybody, I don’t care. Brad Meldau, I love Brad Meldau a lot. Brian Ferry, David Bowie, I mean anybody, I don’t have a dream like, “Oh!” I mean if it was anybody it would probably be Duke Ellington, if I could bring anyone back, or Thelonious Monk. But really, I’ve gotten so much out of the weirdest combination of music that I don’t really try to construct my own future, I just kinda let it happen.

The following Pumpkins album supposedly will not feature Chamberlin during the recording of the next album. However, the details of the next album have constantly been re-worked over this last year. Presumably, Billy, Jeff and the crew is finishing up the album ready for release. A single was expected around this time of year. With Chamberlin’s statement, he looks like he is slated for some kind of collaboration with Corgan and the context suggests performance. We’ll keep you updated. If you haven’t read the longest article in AN history, check out my Mellon Collie and the Infinite Retrospective.

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Billy Corgan To Give Spiritual Talk In Illinois

Billy “WPC” Corgan seems again to venturing into the dialogue on spirituality. In the last few years, Corgan’s spirituality seems to take a bigger place in his life. Earlier in 2009, Corgan opened a website for some time entitled “Everything From Here to There” for the primary subject of “Mind-Body-Soul integration” and how “it can best manifest in our daily life.” Unfortunately, this website’s domain fell out of service sometime around 2012-2013. At the end of this article, I have included the opening letter from the website, found through an Internet archive and no longer available anywhere else.

Journalist Jennifer Weigel, a local Chicago celebrity and writer who has written on spirituality in several books and articles. December 15th, just in a number of days, she will host an event at the Wilmette Theater in Wilmette, Illinois as a part of her “Conversations with Weigel” series, in which she interviews a guest every month on the subject matters pertaining to spirituality. It will be the first kind of interview that Corgan has had in months, since the End Times tour came to an end during late summer. Tickets are $30 and available here.

As promised, here is the opening letter from “Everything From Here to There”, one of the website’s only surviving documents:

Hello, many blessings to you for visiting Everything From Here to There.

The purpose of this website is to discuss openly and without fear concepts of Mind-Body-Soul integration. If you are drawn to the Hidden Truths, drawn to God as something beyond limitation, and drawn to Love as the greatest force in the Universe, then you have come to the right place at the right time. This is a place of Love.

In discussing Mind-Body-Soul integration within the context of holistic Truth, many topics will be explored here that may be new to you. Like any good tree that one would hope to grow, we must set our roots deep into the ground so that what is real will prosper in the Light of Love.

This site is non-denominational, we promote no religion, and if we speak of any belief or faith system it won’t be at the expense of another. That is not to avoid the obvious. Most of the citizens of this planet put their faith in someone or something. This website respects every belief and every faith as an expression of God’s greater Will.

This is not a place of judgment, nor a place of making proof. We begin with the idea that there is a God. We begin with the undying belief that there is a unifying intelligence that manifests itself in Every-thing. Even if you don’t believe in God, exploring fully the idea of a God or Gods should pose no threat to you. The idea of a higher collective intelligence or consistent organizing principle should be worth contemplating no matter what you believe in (or don’t believe in). For who is God if not Us?

Mind-Body-Soul integration is the primary focus of this site, and how it can best manifest in our daily life. We will strive to celebrate the brilliant Spirit in each individual and work collectively to glorify that which is Holy in each and every one of us. To honor and recognize that support for another is also support for ourselves. To kindle the flame in every heart humbly as gratitude for our opportunity here to make a subtle yet important difference. It is that simple.

The date of origination for Everything From Here to There is 9.9.09, a perfect date to mark this beginning of a wonderful opportunity. We swing the garden gate open, and ALL are welcome Here.

William Patrick Corgan”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billy Corgan: ‘Scott Weiland, Kurt Cobain & Layne Staley Were The Voices Of Our Generation’

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan has released a blog on Scott Weiland’s death on SmashingPumpkins.com:

“Having just woken to the news of this passing, I feel compelled to put pen to paper and pay my respects to Scott. And in that I will not pretend to know more than I know, or add some sad homily to how he loved his life. At least in that, may I now say he is undoubtably in the arms of grace and eternal love.

May I also offer my humble condolences to his family, friends, and band mates; who have, and are, suffering this great loss. For when anyone as vaunted leaves far too soon, we mourn all that might have been.

As any fan, I find myself reflecting on what I do have in my own treasure chest: in scarce moments where Scott and I spoke as contemporaries or competitors, and got to know each as people other past the footlights and shadows we were so busy casting to the world. It may seem trite in reflection, but I’d try to make him giggle when I saw that the manic whirl of the dumb parties we were at (in Hollywood, no less!) might be causing undue stress.

It was, I’d guess you’d say, my way of apology for having been so critical of STP when they appeared on the scene like some crazy, man-fueled rocket. And not only was the knight up front freshly handsome to a fault, but he could sing too! As any supreme actor gives a real and different voice to each character played.

It was STP’s 3rd album that had got me hooked, a wizardly mix of glam and post-punk, and I confessed to Scott, as well as the band many times, how wrong I’d been in assessing their native brilliance. And like Bowie can and does, it was Scott’s phrasing that pushed his music into a unique, and hard to pin down, aesthetic sonicsphere.

Lastly, I’d like to share a thought which though clumsy, I hope would please Scott In Hominum. And that is if you asked me who I truly believed were the great voices of our generation, I’d say it were he, Layne, and Kurt.

So it goes beyond tragedy to say it is we who lost them, and not the other way round…

WILLIAM CORGAN”

Look Inside Billy Corgan’s $5 Million Beverly Hills Mansion

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan is selling his Beverly Hills, CA home for $4,950,000. The home is 3,267 square feet, with 4 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms.

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William Patrick Corgan (Billy Corgan) or as he often signs now, ‘WPC’, has always been ahead of the game with a little something extra. Recently Corgan revealed his newest project: ‘People and Their Cars.’ While both people and cars are subjects in the blog, it is not what you think. The blog consists of vintage (or sometimes antique) photographs, a collection curated by Corgan himself. With Corgan’s ventures in music, poetry and teahouses, photography seems like a natural progression. A few days after the launch, Corgan announced the “Red Border Club”, an email listing for the blog. Benefits of joining the RBC include ‘the chance to receive additional images, but to be ‘first-in-line’ for updates on new merchandise and forthcoming People And Their Cars/Hexestential books.’ No emails outside of confirmation have been sent out. Joining the RBC is also free, “with no catch, fees, or obligation to buy.” Corgan has always had a keen sense of art direction and the Pumpkins’ work has been influenced by the aesthetics of vintage photography (and other forms of visual art) over the years.

If interested, register for the RBC here for updates on Corgan’s artistic pursuits!

Frances Bean Cobain, Tool, Billy Corgan & Chris Cornell Celebrate Halloween

The stars of the 90’s alternative rock era (and their offspring) celebrated Halloween in style over the weekend. Tool dressed up as Led Zeppelin and covered “No Quarter” at their Monster Mash festival performance. You can view Tool’s setlist after the Halloween photos.

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan was ‘Count William Corgan’ at Madame ZuZu’s Teahouse, interacting with fans and taking Polaroids. Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell dressed as Chris Cornell, while his daughter Toni dressed up as Marilyn Monroe.

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Tool Setlist:
1- No Quarter (Led Zeppelin cover)
2- The Grudge
3- Parabol
4- Parabola
5- Opiate
6- Schism
7- Ænema
8- Descending
9- Jambi
10- Forty-Six & 2
11- Vicarious
12- Stinkfist

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Count William Corgan To Host Halloween Bash

Billy Corgan (aka William Corgan, William Patrick Corgan, WPC, The Ivory Tower, and BC) is taking holiday festivities to the forefront. On Halloween night, he will be hosting a “Halloween Bash” as “Count William Corgan” at Madame Zuzu’s, his esteemed tea house in his hometown of Chicago. With a band name like “The Smashing Pumpkins”, it is hard to see how a love of Halloween wouldn’t cross someone’s mind. The original Madame Zuzu listing details:

Join Zuzu’s on Halloween Night, Oct. 31 for a special Halloween bash. Your reservation includes: one reserved seat, special servings of ghoulish tea and v-gf dessert, a chance to participate in our (now) annual costume contest, and a vintage-style, peel-apart picture of you taken by your creaky yet congenial host, Count William Corgan. Only the dead could want more!  

At $15.00 a pop, it is far beyond sold out. Corgan has been making more appearances at Madame Zuzu’s lately after the End Times tour, including the three year anniversary event last week. The shop’s culture has grown the last few years and has poetry readings and comedy nights about once every month. The tea house has also recently hosted auctions of art and photography sanctioned by Corgan. Corgan’s interest and activity with photography has been showing especially lately, with the advent of his new blog and outlet People and Their Cars. People and Their Cars however, is not limited to people nor cars. Up today are some peculiar, quaint and mildly disturbing pictures of vintage Halloween costumes.

Around the holidays, we should be expecting a single from the new Pumpkins album whose title is unclear. While Corgan still had his Twitter, he revealed an acronym, “SFTMITHOTS,” which was allegedly an acronym of the album’s full title. The album was originally planned as “Day for Night” but the title was apparently scraped.