Tag Archives: almost acoustic christmas

Chris Cornell, Weezer, Cage the Elephant & Fall Out Boy To Perform At KROQ Almost Acoustic Christmas

Just announced, KROQ has revealed its lineup for Almost Acoustic Christmas. Ticket go on sale this Friday at 12pm. Proceeds will benefit local Los Angeles charities, including Para Los Niños and the Al Wooten Jr. Heritage Foundation. The lineup is below:

Night 1: AWOLNATION, Bastille, Cage The Elephant, Disclosure, Foals, Halsey, Silversun Pickups,The Struts, Twenty One Pilots, Weezer, and X Ambassadors.

Night 2: Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness, Chris Cornell, Cold War Kids, Elle King, Fall Out Boy,George Ezra, James Bay, Of Monsters And Men, Panic! At The Disco, The 1975, and The Neighbourhood.

Tickets, available here at Ticketmaster, are subject to the prices listed below. Tickets limited to 4 a household:

GA Floor: $135.00
Floor Risers: $150.00
Sec 100 Lower Bowl: $150.00
Sec 100 Center Lower Bowl: $135.00
Sec 100 Upper Bowl: $95.00
Sec 200 Upper Bowl: $75.00

Last year, several prominent bands we cover here at AlternativeNation played at Almost Acoustic Christmas 2014, like Queens of the Stone Age, the Smashing Pumpkins and System of a Down. Let’s see if this lineup can top last year’s performance!

Featured here in our article on the new Temple of the Dog performance footage that surfaced, Chris Cornell recently talked to AV Club about their song “Hunger Strike”:

Chris Cornell discussed Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” in a new AV Club article.

“I don’t really remember it. [Laughs.] I kind of remember the basics but singing on that album happened so quickly. The song itself, it really wasn’t much of a song. It was a verse with just a kind of repeating chorus. It was just where we needed one more song for the album, and I had that down, but I hadn’t played it for anybody yet because I didn’t feel it was a complete song. But I knew we had nine songs, and I thought 10 would be a nice, even round number. I just figured that this would be the 10th song that would wrap up the album, and it would just be what it was, verse for verse and then repeating chorus sort of like a coda for the album listening experience. In rehearsing it, and I think we only rehearsed for two days for that album, but I was singing both parts of the song. I sang the high verse part and then the low chorus part and then the high chorus part and so on.

Eddie and the rest of them were waiting for us to finish because they were about to have one of their first rehearsals as Pearl Jam, and he saw me sort of struggling with it, so he just walked up to the mic and started singing the low part, and I started singing the high part. I immediately got this idea that his voice sounded so rich in that low register that it would become more of a song if I sang the first verse, then the whole band kicks in, and then he sings that verse again, but in effect it becomes a different verse. It’s a different person. It’s a different voice and a different everything. And I think I had that idea right there on the spot; we did it that way, and suddenly it was a real song. I hate to use that term “real song” but to me it was like: Okay, in just a moment this has become an arrangement that changes everything.

I never thought about it as being singular or anything because there were a lot of really well written songs that lent themselves to the notion of a single, but once we played it for other people, that was the choice that was made. But my memory of us singing it together is I just went in and sang my part, he went in and sang his part, and it took probably 40 minutes, and that was it. That was back in the day where you had no record budget, and that album in particular was recorded and mixed in a total of 14 days, not in a row.”