Stone Temple Pilots Talk Scott Weiland: ‘He Didn’t Want To Be Around Us, We Told Him The Truth’

Robert and Dean DeLeo discussed the death of late Stone Temple Pilots frontman Scott Weiland on KROQ’s Kevin and Bean Show this morning. Alternative Nation transcribed some quotes from the interview.

Dean said, “Look man, when somebody keeps going in that direction, and I’m hanging on with hope, and help, and prayer, and doing whatever I can do. I spent over 20 years doing that, and it eventually starts to creep into my own home, my own living room, my own family. It starts to damage me.”

Robert said, “I don’t know if people really understand addiction, and being around that, and not being an addict, and having to live with that on a personal and a business relationship.”

He added, “I think what we did offer Scott over the course of our career was the truth, and honesty. Someone who is that deep in their addiction runs from that, they run from truth and honesty. That’s where he was, we became these guys that he didn’t want to be around because we were telling him like it was.

  • Chris Warren

    I have played with a few musicians that gladly, are still living, but their addictions ruined their magnificent talent. I tried in vain to reach out with music and personal support. It only served in the end, to result in a parting of ways. When a band of brothers make music together, it lives and breathes as a whole. It is time for this band to heal, and be able to breathe their own music again. I look forward to it.

  • dakotablue

    I think the same type of thing happened with Layne–the rest of the Chains just couldn’t deal with his addiction anymore and waiting for him to be able to perform and be part of the band again. There probably was a big confrontation and then Layne cut them off, refused to see them or answer their calls. Mike Starr, another junkie, was the only band member Layne let in his house. Sometimes the truth hurts too much.

    • valhalla

      Wasn’t Mike Starr the last one believed to have seen Layne alive? If I’m not confused, (and I very well could be), Mike felt an enormous amount of guilt for not calling 911 to help Layne. Guilt can be a powerful relapse trigger. Not to mention the physiological pain and havoc of attempting to kick opiate addiction in particular and other drugs, including alcohol, in general.

      I appreciate that this article seems to balance out what, in my very humble opinion, is a whole lot of speculation by Richard Patrick in that other article from today. Maybe I just have a personal bias against Mr. Patrick, although I do wish him continued success with his ongoing recovery. The DeLeos just come across as more sincere; perhaps because they are not speculating as to the direct circumstances regarding Scott’s death. We have the coroner’s report for that.

      The important thing about these articles is that maybe it will encourage a national, or at least an Alt Nation, dialogue about the drug epidemic in this country. And not just illicit street drugs, but prescription drugs, as well, which are still responsible for more deaths than heroin, cocaine, and meth combined.

      • Pink Taco

        Dean DeLeo was a regular cocaine user, smoked pot and took LSD.

        • Pink Taco

          Dean, usually bursting with boisterous charm, is not smiling as he talks. He too struggled with addiction, years ago in his home state, New Jersey. “I’ve been there,” Dean says frankly. “I’ve had the spike in my arm. But I never let my brothers down.”

          • Nikki

            So sanctimonious. There are degrees of addiction Dean, often complicated by mental illness.

        • Felonious Punk

          And made some of the greatest guitar licks of the 90s while doing so!

          • Pink Taco

            absol-positively. they were able to make the drugs work for them and be really creative. Scotts book went over this. Scott became a lot more fearless and confident and found a lot of creativity.

          • Felonious Punk

            I think that could explain why Oasis went downhill so hard, too.

            Their first three albums were made under the influence of loads of cocaine and other narcotics. And all three are undisputed classics. Everything else after that pretty much sucked because they stopped doing drugs after Be Here Now.

          • Corndog

            I didn’t realise you liked Oasis? I didn’t think they ever really broke America.

          • valhalla

            Now there’s a band that needs to settle their differences and get back together. I think Scott said that he spilled more cocaine than the Gallagher brothers ever snorted.

            And this thread sure took a left turn…lol…

          • Pink Taco

            I definitely like the first 2 – Definitely Maybe and WTSMG – but “be here now” I listen and I listen and I’m not sure what kind of sound they were going for.

          • valhalla

            Beady Eye is a pretty good album with Liam, Gem, Andy, and Chris. I could not really get into Noel’s High Flying Birds.

          • Bilbo

            Correlation is not causation and drugs are not a magic potion. This is an excuse for musicians to justify their weakness and addictions. They didn’t produce great music because they were high, but despite being high. It’s their talent that enabled them to create great music.

          • Felonious Punk

            So how come everything after they stopped doing drugs failed to reach the heights of their first three albums, which were made under the influence of narcotics?

            Don’t Believe The Truth, Dig Out Your Soul, Heathen Chrmistry…none of those albums even approach the magic of Definitely Maybe or Morning Glory.

            How do you account for that?

          • Bilbo

            Well, how many classic albums did you want them to put out? For every masterpiece released by a junkie there are one thousand crap albums released by other junkies, but you never hear of them, do you? What’s the difference?

            By the way, Be Here Now was the album in which Noel’s drug use was at its peak, so by that logic it should be their best album, right? I for once like Standing in the Shoulders of Giants as much as the first two albums.

          • Felonious Punk

            All I’m saying is that they set a precedent with their first three albums, and then the quality dropped off dramatically after that. Coincidentally, that was when they stopped doing drugs.

            I wouldn’t say Be Here Now is their best album, but it was definitely the peak of their excess, as evidenced by the album as a whole. Their egos were definitely at their peak, that’s for sure.

            SOTSOG is indeed a good album, but I don’t think it’s anywhere near as consistent as their first three. The song quality just isn’t there like it is on the previous albums. But SOTSOG is definitely one of my favorite albums they did, as well.

          • dakotablue

            Dean is a VERY underrated guitarist, imo.

        • Ann Anderson

          And also a heroin addict. So he personally understood and felt Scott’s pain. And he was the one that seemed to be the most affected by Scott’s death. Dean’s addictions were never to the degree of Scott’s though. And Scott’s were further complicated by often severe and challenging to treat bipolar disorder. I am also bipolar and have struggled with opiate addiction. It is a difficult situation but I was able to get effective treatment and have been well for over 15 years. I did have to quit working and also get a total hysterectomy (I know, TMI, but fluctuating hormonal levels wreak havoc on bipolar disorder). Being an advanced practice RN, I always wanted to get well. For my family and for myself. And that was a major factor in my success. I know that Scott also wanted to get well and did go to rehab countless times. And he had varying degrees of success. He used to take a sober coach and even a mental health professional on tours. But it seemed that his resolve and energy to follow through decreased through the years. His physical and mental health both were damaged by his substance abuse. And he also had hepatitis C which was especially problematic with his heavy drinking. It seemed like the last year just sucked the life out of him. With Jeremy Brown’s death and then his parents’ cancer diagnosis and his worsening mental and physical health. And he gave up any pretense of maintaining sobriety. He had a bottle of organic vodka and other liquor in his backstage dressing room rider. A very sad thing.

          • Cowgirl

            Strangely, I am curious about the ORGANIC vodka. After all of the substances he had put in his body over years, why did it have to be organic? What even makes it organic?

          • Ann Anderson

            I know I found that absolutely ridiculous too. It reminded me of a part in his ex-wife’s book where she talked about how, at the height of their mutual heroin addiction that she made sure that they ate at least 1-2 power bars a day “as if that would have made us any less dead from an overdose” she said.

        • valhalla

          I remember Scott talking about Dean’s drug use, but, didn’t Dean get clean? I’m also wondering if Dean’s drug use compromised his performance, ability to be on time for gigs, rehearsals, etc.

        • Corndog

          Apparently a much more ‘functioning’ addict than Weiland in that case.

          • Nikki

            Yes, which makes Scott’s prolificacy when he was apart from the rest of STP all the more staggering, considering his dysfunction. Compared to the limited output from Eric, Robert and Dean at least, who were all perfectly functional.

      • dakotablue

        Yes, it appears Mike was the last person to see Layne, who was sick (actually dying, as we now know) but told Mike he’d never speak to him again if Mike called 911. Well, Layne didn’t speak to him again anyway, even though Mike didn’t call, because he died. And Mike felt horribly guilty about that.

  • Ann Anderson

    This is something many if not most of us already knew and believed. My dad was a major alcoholic and often unstable bipolar sufferer but had some pretty big denial issues. He would go to AA to shut us up but once there he would not really participate at all. He was honest about that though. He was also a major chain smoker since he was in his early teens. He died from liver cancer (for obvious reasons) at age 68 and I can’t believe that he made it that long. Scott reminded me of him in some ways. The STP guys really were family to Scott and I can understand how difficult that must have been for them. They stuck by him through the worst of times for many years but it had to take a tremendous toll on them. And I would hope that Scott would have tried to look at that from their point of view. For years the thing that they feared the most, even other than the damaged relationships with their business, performance, financial and fans, was Scott’s death. I am sure that after he began relapsing on the last STP tour to support their eponymous album, that they were more or less resigned to the fact that he was going to die from his addictions and there was nothing more that they could do other than to love him. But that they had to part ways with him as part of their group. As Eric said , “He was making choices and all of them were going bad”. Yet they came to accept the fact that perhaps Scott was simply to mentally ill to change. Hopefully with Scott’s death, his fans will be more likely to accept another singer with STP. I can think of 2 other groups (off the top of my head) that successfully did this. Alice in Chains, with William DuVall and AC/DC with Brian Johnson. Both singers’ voices were very similar sounding and this helped matters, So I wish Dean, Robert and Eric the best of luck with the singer search and moving forward.