All posts by Osty Gale

A first year student attending Cape Breton University, working towards his BA in Journalism, Osty has publications in The New Waterford Community Press as well as The Caper Times, the local university paper. He loves writing, reporting, and interviewing. Osty worked on a committee for the Cape Breton Regional Municipality (C.B.R.M), to help bring back youth events in the area. (Youth events were cancelled for a period of time because of excessive violence and underage drinking.) The committee presented the solution to council on July 5, 2012. Fun facts: I was one pound 5 ounces when I was born. Two short stories I wrote were featured in a book called “Friends Forever.” “Ki-Na Na”, a song I wrote, was aired at the local station “The Coast” 89.7 in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. I like a vast array of music from American folk music all the way up the spectrum to heavy metal music.

Kurt Cobain Sings About Not Selling Records & Smoking Hash In New Punk Rocker

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features an unreleased song called “Rehash.” “Rehash” sounds like Henry Rollins era Black Flag thrash-style with a heavy guitar riff and heavy screams, while the chorus (Rehash, Rehash) doesn’t sound at all like Cobain’s regular vocals. It’s clearly an in-development idea, as Cobain recites where he wants the solo, by orally saying: “Solo” as he plays the riff, over and over again. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

“Rehash” lyrics:

I tried out for the high school band
then I tried to join the crowd
My records didn’t sell
Now I keep them very healthy in my cellar what do you want?
????
????
????
????

Chorus:

Rehash x 15

Post Chorus/ Bridge( ?) :

Playin’ in a Bar Band
Playin in a bar band
Playin in a bar band
Thank God I’m not bland
Playin in a bar band
playing in a bar band
Thank God I’m not bland
Playin’ in a bar band

Rehash x 15
OH!!!

Kurt’s speaking voice: “Solo”

“Solo”

“Solo”
“Solo”
“Solo”

“Chorus”
“Chorus”

Rehash x13
“Smoke hash”

Check out the lyrics to other unreleased Kurt Cobain tracks from Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings on Alternative Nation’s articles on “She Only Lies” and the new version of “Do Re Mi.” Also read our in-depth track by track review of Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings.

Kurt Cobain Sings ‘I Really Hate Her’ In New Song ‘She Only Lies’

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features an unreleased song called “She Only Lies.” It is a haunting song, with dark lyrics alluding to guilt and self-condemnation, along with shame towards the other person. This could’ve easily been another song by Nirvana, with such a great bass-line. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

“She Only Lies”

She only lies
Just to save my feelings
I cry inside
Just to make to her feel good
I hold inside
Guilt that isn’t real in
I find the lie
Just to burn my eyes

Oh, Oh

She only lies
Just to save my feelings
I only cry
Just to make her feel guilty
I cry inspite
Just to save my reasons
I know its right
Cause i wont hurt to die…
I love her
Oh i really hate her
And i know that you will hate her too
If you were given half the chance at all

I’ll definitely be listening to Kurt Cobain’s Home Recordings, not just for historical value, but as it was intended: as a way to get inside Kurt’s mind and listen how he composes songs the way he does. It feels exactly like you’re in the room with Kurt, as he’s practicing the chords, tuning the guitar, or just goofing off with one of his voices for comedy. In conclusion, Montage Of Heck: The Home Recordings (Deluxe Ed.) is exactly what any hardcore Nirvana/ Kurt Cobain fan would love, to understand the creative process – along with the film, of Kurt Cobain. 5/5 Stars.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, will be released by Universal Music Enterprises in multiple formats, including the Super Deluxe Edition as well as in Blu-ray, DVD and digital video formats. The soundtrack album, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will also be released on CD and digitally on November 13, 2015. A 2LP vinyl edition of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will follow on December 4, 2015. In addition, a 7-inch single featuring “And I Love Her” and “Sappy (Early Demo)” is also scheduled for release on November 20, 2015.

Read Alternative Nation’s full review of Kurt Cobain’s Home Recordings by clicking here.

Kurt Cobain Contemplates Afterlife In Chilling Final Recording

Edited by Brett Buchanan

Kurt Cobain’s Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will be released next month, and it features a new version of “Do Re Mi” from March 1994. The track is one of Cobain’s last known home recordings, and this new version features different lyrics. While the sound quality makes it hard to guarantee that all of these lyrics are correct, this is my stab at them from what I heard, with some missing.

Wish me was
Wish me twice
She’s reflamed beside you
Youuuu x 5
Wants me me gone
Right now I know that I need
Dreaming
Dream
Dreaming
Like a man
I complain
To see thee
….
…..
…..
Finally have to see me
Judge dear god
What I know
I wish I could see me

Sunken back into your dream
Stretch me down
Fuck me up
I wish I was greeting
Let me lie
I wish I might
I wish I could
screaming

Greet me some day
And I will fall
And I will call
And greet thee
(repeated Greet thee)

Drag me down
And finally I’m gone…
…..

Praise god…

I had the privilege of receiving and reviewing an advance copy of the upcoming Kurt Cobain album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings album for Alternative Nation. It’s basic, low-fi, and stripped down to the bare bones. It’s raw! The album jumps straight into Cobain’s psyche. From the opening strumming and mumbles on “The Yodel Song,” to the ever-angelic, elongated, work-in-progress take of “Do Re Mi,” the album is a trip inside of Cobain’s creative process.  It even features a track that easily could have been a Nirvana pop hit.

Sound collage experiments like “Montage of Kurt I” & II,” “Kurt’s Audio Collage,” “Scream,” and “Kurt’s Ambiance” provide a sonic representation of what was written in Cobain’s journals. This is where noise rock experimental influences like William S. Burroughs (Kurt had read Naked Lunch after getting it in a bookstall in London while on tour), Sonic Youth, and Scratch Acid are evident.

The spoken-word comedy bits like the satirical advertisement for the “Capitol Lake Jam Commercial,” “Rhesus Monkey,” “Sea Monkeys,” “Underground Celebritism,” as well as “Aberdeen,” and “Beans” show the foray of Kurt’s genius at work, merging music with comedy.

Instrumental pieces like “Reverb Experiment,” with its intense feedback, sounds like an end-type jam at a Nirvana gig, as well as a homage to the Melvins. “Retreat,” “Letters To Frances,” and “The Happy Guitar” show off other styles of guitar playing that Kurt didn’t show off in live performances with his band Nirvana. This is a new kind of Kurt Cobain, as you’ve never heard him before.

The album also features acoustic demos of 5 songs, that would later be released on subsequent Nirvana albums, both live, and in the studio (“Been A Son,” “Scoff,” “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle,” “Sappy,” “Something In the Way”).

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck Super Deluxe Edition and Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings both include the highly anticipated soundtrack, an aural complement to the documentary in both concept and experience. Comprised from various early and raw cassette recordings made by Kurt alone, the soundtrack allows a rare, unfiltered glimpse into Cobain’s creative progression.

You can read Alternative Nation’s full review of Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings by clicking here.

Review: New Kurt Cobain Album Has Raw Hits

Edited by Brett Buchanan

I had the privilege of receiving and reviewing an advance copy of the upcoming Kurt Cobain album Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings album for Alternative Nation. It’s basic, low-fi, and stripped down to the bare bones. It’s raw! The album jumps straight into Cobain’s psyche. From the opening strumming and mumbles on “The Yodel Song,” to the ever-angelic, elongated, work-in-progress take of “Do Re Mi,” the album is a trip inside of Cobain’s creative process.  It even features a track that easily could have been a Nirvana pop hit.

Sound collage experiments like “Montage of Kurt I” & II,” “Kurt’s Audio Collage,” “Scream,” and “Kurt’s Ambiance” provide a sonic representation of what was written in Cobain’s journals. This is where noise rock experimental influences like William S. Burroughs (Kurt had read Naked Lunch after getting it in a bookstall in London while on tour), Sonic Youth, and Scratch Acid are evident.

The spoken-word comedy bits like the satirical advertisement for the “Capitol Lake Jam Commercial,” “Rhesus Monkey,” “Sea Monkeys,” “Underground Celebritism,” as well as “Aberdeen,” and “Beans” show the foray of Kurt’s genius at work, merging music with comedy.

Instrumental pieces like “Reverb Experiment,” with its intense feedback, sounds like an end-type jam at a Nirvana gig, as well as a homage to the Melvins. “Retreat,” “Letters To Frances,” and “The Happy Guitar” show off other styles of guitar playing that Kurt didn’t show off in live performances with his band Nirvana. This is a new kind of Kurt Cobain, as you’ve never heard him before.

The album also features acoustic demos of 5 songs, that would later be released on subsequent Nirvana albums, both live, and in the studio (“Been A Son,” “Scoff,” “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle,” “Sappy,” “Something In the Way”).

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck Super Deluxe Edition and Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings both include the highly anticipated soundtrack, an aural complement to the documentary in both concept and experience. Comprised from various early and raw cassette recordings made by Kurt alone, the soundtrack allows a rare, unfiltered glimpse into Cobain’s creative progression.

Track by Track

“The Yodel Song” – Starts off with a bit of mumbling, and then a chord progression, with mumbles/yodeling over the top. Recorded circa 1986 – 1988.

“Been A Son (Early Demo)”– Acoustic demo, with alternate lyrics, where Cobain first performs the song on guitar, and then performs the bass part.

“What More Can I Say?”– An acoustic/electric song, that was added in the limited theatrical re-release of the film in August 2015. Clocking in at 3 minutes, it’s a very formulaic song, and would’ve easily fit within the Nirvana repertoire in 1993/1994.

“1988 Capitol Lake Jam Commercial” – Cobain’s satirical and comedic take on the then-upcoming Capitol Lake Jam, using a multitude of voices. One was heard in “Beans” (the With The Lights Out Version), as well as another deeper voice.

“The Happy Guitar” is an instrumental that sounds like a theme from a 60’s television series set in Hawaii. This was first released on the Outcesticide bootleg series in 1994, under the title “Black and White Blues” (made by Bootleggers) albeit in inferior quality.

“Montage Of Kurt I” –  Vocal experimentation featuring Kurt satirically talking about, among other things: Bong water, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, and other weird vocal abnormalities. It ends with weird squeaks from baby toys and guitar/pedal feedback.

“Beans” – From a recording in 1987/1988. Cobain uses his “chipmunk” voice again, as also featured within the 1988 Capitol Lake Jam track, as well as others.  First released on the Outcesticide III: The Final Solution bootleg, albeit in inferior quality. Released again in 2004, on With The Lights Out. This is a sonic upgrade, and could be an alternate take/mix of the “song.”

“Burn The Rain” – Speculated to be recorded somewhere from 1987 – 1988, as evidenced on the tape that: “she’s not home right now” part in the Montage Of Heck film, where this comes from. At this time, Kurt was dating Tracy Marander.

“Clean Up Before She Comes (Early Demo)” – An earlier take of the song, than the one released on With The Lights Out. From c. 1987/1988 based on research provided by www.LiveNirvana.com.

“Reverb Experiment” – An instrumental piece of guitar feedback/distortion, with an over-use of the Polychorus reverb effects pedal. It sounds like an ode to both his contemporaries (The Melvins and Butthole Surfers) as well as a homage to The Grateful Dead’s long exploratory “Space” segments of their later shows.

“Montage Of Kurt II” – Another spoken audio collage of everything from bong water, to pieces from what we knew as “Beans” (those voices were first heard in “Beans” (With the Lights Out,2004) although this is an extended version of said “skit.”

“Rehash” sounds like Henry Rollins era Black Flag thrash-style with a heavy guitar riff and heavy screams, while the chorus (Rehash, Rehash) doesn’t sound at all like Cobain’s regular vocals. It’s clearly an in-development idea, as Cobain recites where he wants the solo, by orally saying:  “Solo” as he plays the riff, over and over again.

“You Can’t Change Me/Burn My Britches/Something In The Way (Early Demo)” – A 3-song segue, which Brett Morgen has described as a “Punk Opera.” It really is an epic, in every sense of the word. From the start of the verse of “You Can’t Change Me,” sounding very thrashesque, and then segueing into the grungy “Burn My Britches.” The segue then softly decrescendos to a slow, but heavy, version of “Something In The Way” (akin to the BBC version mixed with the Boombox Rehearsal version, if both didn’t have drums. (both versions were released on Nevermind 20th). This version of “Something in The Way,” sounds as if Cobain is close to tears (like the Boombox’s final verse/chorus segment).

“Scoff (Early Demo)” – A Quick run-through of what seems to be the first ever recording of the song, released later on, on the album “Bleach

“Aberdeen” is the story of Cobain rehearsing his narrative of story-telling; a story about having sexual intercourse with a mentally disabled girl in his early teens. This has been disproven as being a true story by Buzz Osbourne, Kurt’s close friend and mentor in his early days of playing music, and was only another example of his dark sense of humor.

“Bright Smile” – Cobain uses his falsetto voice here to sing this almost 2-minute song, with an electric guitar underneath the vocals. The lyrics “Bright smile” are repeated throughout until the final “Smile” is yelled at the end.

“Underground Celebritism” – A short 28-second audio snippet of Kurt rhyming off about “underground celebration” which seems to be about not selling out, while he plays a little riff underneath the vocals.

“Retreat” – A 2-minute instrumental piece, with Cobain’s vocals breathing to end the track.

“Desire” – A standout acoustic number, running at 2 minutes and 27-seconds long. If this was worked on anymore, it could’ve been a hit. With the leading chorus of “Desire” repeated twice, and the riff afterwards before the second verse, it could’ve been another poppy acoustic hit.

“And I Love Her” – An acoustic rendition of the Fab Four’s ’64 hit. Recorded approximately in late 1993/early 1994.

“Sea Monkeys” – Spoken word audio of Kurt talking about Sea Monkeys…. Tower Records… and Paula Abdul.

“Sappy” – A new upgraded mix, from the version that was released unofficially on the “Outcesticide” bootleg series. A raw, stripped, acoustic version of the song that would eventually end up, electrically and more Nirvana-ized on the No Alternative Compilation in 1993.

“Letters To Frances” – A bright, and mellow 2-minute instrumental piece, written for his daughter, alternating from light strums, to a heavier strumming pattern/tone near the end.

“Scream” – A 32-second montage of wails layered with static, with Kurt using a pitch-shifter at the end for his screaming.

“Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle”
– An acoustic 4 minute demo of the In Utero track, with some alternate lyrics.

“Kurt Ambiance” is just what one would believe it to be. It’s nothing more than static through the cassette player.

“She Only Lies” – A haunting song, with dark lyrics alluding to guilt and self-condemnation, along with shame towards the other person. This could’ve easily been another song by Nirvana, with such a great bass-line.

“Kurt Audio Collage” – A 24-second audio collage of birds chirping, water flowing, and some signal interference near the end.

“Poison’s Gone” – An acoustic song clocking in at 2 minutes, with similar subject matter to “She Only Lies.”

“Rhesus Monkey” – One more of Kurt’s spoken word comedy skits, using various voices.

“Do Re Mi” (Medley) – The grandiose finale of the Deluxe Edition, of one of Kurt’s final recordings (recorded just 3 weeks before his death). By the end of the take, at over 10 minutes, Kurt’s voice is shrill, and cracking.

For historical value of the insight into Cobain’s process of crafting songs from his early, pre-Nirvana days, to his final months, this is essential listening for any fan of Cobain, as well as anyone whom may be a fan of Nirvana.

Verdict:

I’ll definitely be listening to this, not just for historical value, but as it was intended: as a way to get inside Kurt’s mind and listen how he composes songs the way he does. It feels exactly like you’re in the room with Kurt, as he’s practicing the chords, tuning the guitar, or just goofing off with one of his voices for comedy. In conclusion, Montage Of Heck: The Home Recordings (Deluxe Ed.) is exactly what any hardcore Nirvana/ Kurt Cobain fan would love, to understand the creative process – along with the film, of Kurt Cobain.  5/5 Stars.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, will be released by Universal Music Enterprises in multiple formats, including the Super Deluxe Edition as well as in Blu-ray, DVD and digital video formats. The soundtrack album, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will also be released on CD and digitally on November 13, 2015. A 2LP vinyl edition of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck: The Home Recordings will follow on December 4, 2015. In addition, a 7-inch single featuring “And I Love Her” and “Sappy (Early Demo)” is also scheduled for release on November 20, 2015. Cobain_MOH_DLX_RGB

Scottish BAFTA Nominee’s THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS play NXNE and Ontario June Theatre Dates

SCOTTISH REBEL TROUBADOURS –  BRING THEIR PRIMAL ROOTS ROCK ‘N’ ROLL FUELED WITH  PUNK ATTITUDE TO CANADA FOR THE FIRST TIME
 
BAFTA NOMINATED THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS 
PERFORM AT TORONTO’S RIVOLI SAT. JUNE 21 FOR NXNE
AND THEATRES DATES IN PETERBOROUGH, PORT HOPE, KINGSTON
TORONTO – June 2014 – UK industry insiders brag about seeing Edinburgh, Scotland’s The Black Diamond Express (TBDE) quoting that they are a cross between Robert Johnson and The Sex Pistols. This not to miss, passionate, award winning eight piece band are coming to Canada for the first time.  UK critics love The Black Diamond Express proclaiming they are a compelling sight to behold and have been the highlight of the past year’s festivals and as the opening act for The Mavericks UK tour early this year.  
 
The Black Diamond Express sound is an amalgamation of Celtic and American roots.   But rather than be an imitation of some bygone era, they offer an inventive take on the old traditional styles of music and collectively produce a sound that is truly theirs alone. Always dressed to kill their live performance showcases slide guitar, fiddle, layered vocals, harmonica and a pounding rhythm section. Listening to the songs you will hear echoes of the chain gang, plaintive melodies, gospel hymns and gut-buckets, noir narratives and tall tales, truth and fiction in equal measure.
 
They have been invited to NXNE to play the Rivoli Sat. June 21 and have confirmed June 24 at Peterborough ShowplaceJune 26 at The Sculthorpe venue at The Capitol Theatre in Port Hope and June 27 Kingston for the Blues Society at the RCHA Club.  They are confirming venue in Hamilton and are considering other Ontario dates.  Board the train and be transported.
 
Formed in 2007, they have their just released their live record called Brimstone for Hell and an EP from 2008 titled A Murder Of Crows.   They have toured constantly through the UK fine tuning their stunning live show featuring their passionate blues inspired songs that are turning hearts and heads.  The band was nominated in 2011 for a Scottish BAFTA for their work on the short film ‘A Zombie Musical’. The band were also involved with the flourishing educational project ‘The Tinderbox Orchestra’ and performed for the Dalai Lama on his most recent State visit.
THE BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS ARE:
 
Jack of Diamonds – vocals/guitar (front man)

The Duke – drums/vocals 

George Marsden – Piano/Keys
Ewan Gibson – Electric Bass/vocals
Stephen Robinson – dobro/vocals
Steve MacLennan – guitar/vocals/mandolin/banjo
Cameron Henderson – filddle/vocals
Tom ‘Harpo’ McClelland – harmonica
Check out some of their upcoming concert dates below and check out their official site.
Concert Dates 
NXNE – Sat. June 21 Rivoli – 1AM
Peterborough 24th June (Showplace) http://www.showplace.org/#!black-diamond-express/cge4
Port Hope 26th June (Capitol Theatre) venue The Sculthorpe Theatre http://capitoltheatre.com/?p=1766
Kingston 27th June (Blues Society Concert)http://www.kingstonbluessociety.ca/The Standeasy @ the RCHA Club – 193 Ontario StreetWebsitehttp://www.theblackdiamondexpress.com

Audio Blood Does NXNE 2014 – Featuring Amos The Transparent, Old Man Canyon, Slow Down Molasses And More‏

North by Northeast, one of the most anticipated festivals of the summer, is set to take over Toronto again from June 13 – 22, 2014. This year, a number of Audio Blood artists will take part in the festival including Amos the TransparentOld Man Canyon, and Slow Down Molasses. Along with great music, the week includes a number of great parties powered by Audio Blood including Hidden Pony’s 5th Anniversary Party Presented by Indie88 and Audio Blood’s Annual Rooftop Rager Fuelled by Pistonhead Lager. See below for full schedule.

 

AMOS THE TRANSPARENT (Ottawa)

Amos

In addition to their NXNE appearance, Ottawa folk-rockers Amos The Transparent are preparing their forthcoming album This Cold Escape this fall. In an effort to appease fans eager for new material, the band launched a direct-to-fan PledgeMusic campaign, and exceeded their goal in a matter of weeks. The concept album, tells the story of a man’s desire to distance himself from the world he’s crafted for himself in order to stay close to those he loves.

WATCH: Official video for “Sure as the Weather” www.youtube.com/watch?v=oObLmIIwHdI

SHOWCASE SCHEDULE
June 18 @ The Supermarket – 8PM (*Unofficial NXNE event)
June 18 @ The Rivoli – 11PM

LINKS 
www.amosthetransparent.com
www.facebook.com/amosthetransparent
www.twitter.com/amostransparent

OLD MAN CANYON (Vancouver)
Old man canyon
Rising altnerative folk rockers Old Man Canyon are, capitivating audiences with their haunting harmonies, and chilling music videos. Since the release of the band’s Phantom & Friends EP, their music has been featured on a variety of television programs including Awkward (MTV), Shameless (Showtime), and Suits (Bravo) among others. The music video for the EP’s title track “Phantoms & Friends” caught the attention of several industry tastemakers and prominent media outlets. Celebrity blogger Perez Hilton featured the video on his site, lauding the band’s originality and fresh take on rock music. Having recently kicked off their North American tour with a sold out show opening for Foster The People, you can catch Old Man Canyon at several showcases during NXNE.
WATCH: Official video for “Phantoms & Friends”
www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzIGIBQXVqA
SHOWCASE SCHEDULE:
June 20 @ 159 Manning BBQ – 9:15PM
1:30PM (*Unofficial NXNE event)
June 21 @ St. James Gazebo – 7PM
LINKS:
www.oldmancanyon.com
www.facebook.com/oldmancanyon
www.twitter.com/oldmancanyon

SLOW DOWN MOLASSES (Saskatoon)
Slow Down Molasses
Saskatoon’s Slow Down Molasses are a five-piece indie rock collective described as “the Broken Social Scene of the prairies” by Exclaim!. Taking cues from the wide-open spaces of their home, they craft expansive, texture-heavy pop songs that break into storm squalls of drone, delay, and feedback. For their new record Burnt Black Cars, out early next year, they turned to producer and prairies ex-pat Jace Lasek of Besnard Lakes. Lasek helps develop the dreamy vocal arrangements of their previous album Walk Into the Sea and sharpens the songwriting into concise blasts of synth-driven melodies and full-on rock choruses. After playing a number of successful sets at SXSW in Austin, Texas this past March, Slow Down Molasses look forward to performing the new material at NXNE.
WATCH: “Home” live at CMJ
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qC6LE9dhAc
SHOWCASE SCHEDULE:
June 19 @ Rancho Relaxo – 2AM
Jun. 20 @ The Football Factory – 9:15PM (*Unofficial NXNE event)
June 21 @ Audio Blood’s Annual Rooftop Rager (340 Dufferin St.)  – 2:15PM (*Unofficial NXNE event)
June 21 @ Dakota Tavern  – 11PM
LINKS
www.slowdownmolasses.com
www.facebook.com/slowdownmolasses
www.twitter.com/SlowdownMolasseHidden Pony Records 5th Anniversary Showcase
 Indie 88 Presents: #HBHP Toronto @ NXNEHPRecordsHidden Pony’s 5th Anniversary Presented by Indie88 taking place on Friday, June 20 at The Horseshoe Tavern (370 Queen St. W) features sets by Rah Rah, Royal Tusk, Odds, and The Danks. The party kicks off at noon and will wrap up at 5PM.  Admission is free for those with NXNE wristbands or delegate badges.

Featuring…
Rah Rah
Royal Tusk
Odds
The Danks

Friday, June 20
12 – 5PM
@ Horseshoe Tavern
(370 Queen St. W)
Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/646274568787108

Audio Blood’s Annual Rooftop Rager
Fuelled by Pistonhead Kustom Lager
RooftopRager
Don’t miss Audio Blood’s Annual Rooftop Rager Fuelled By Pistonhead Lager (340 Dufferin St) on Saturday, June 21 from 1 – 6PM. Catch Slow Down Molasses, Old Man Canyon, Army Girls, Royal Tusk, Fast Romantics, and a special secret guest.

Featuring…
Fast Romantics
Army Girls
Old Man Canyon
Slow Down Molasses
Royal Tusk
Plus a special secret guest!

Saturday, June 21
1 – 6PM
@ 340 Dufferin St.
(Kuda Imports)
Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/608391079267719

Planzio
PLanzio
Making it’s Canadian debut Planzio is a scheduling app that saves time making plans with friends, family and co-workers.  Planzio integrates search and calendar into group messaging, letting you quickly suggest and schedule plans – no need to toggle between your calendar, search, map, local recommendation, and texting apps. Planzio will be your ticket into these parties. The app is available for iPhones and Android here.
About NXNE
Now in its 20th year, North by Northeast Festivals and Conference (NXNE) is the premiere Canadian festival destination for emerging artists and major-label headliners. For ten days and nights, NXNE Music offers the best in music and industry conversation, all within a few blocks of each other. For more information visit www.nxne.com.

Cover of Neil Young’s Latest Memoir Appears Online

The front cover artwork of Neil Young‘s latest memoir has recently appeared online.

The Neil Young fansite Thrasher’s Wheat posted the image of  Special Deluxe – A Memoir of Life & Cars, from the Instagram account of website Rock Book Show.

Special Deluxe – A Memoir of Life & Cars is the follow-up to Waging Heavy Peace and is due for publication on October 7th,2014.

Beastie Boys Call It Quits

The Beastie Boys are calling it quits, after a lengthy courtroom battle against Monster Beverage Corp. The case revolves around Monster’s usage of several Beastie Boys’ tracks in a “Ruckus in the Rockies” video that the corporation also used as a memorial to MCA. Yauch had stated in his will that his likeness or art, including his work with the Beastie Boys, was not to be used for advertising purposes.

Beastie Boys rappers Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz and Michael “Mike D” Diamond spent some time this week explaining to a New York court that no, they aren’t making music anymore without their third member, Adam “MCA” Yauch, who died, and no, they don’t want to endorse any celebrity products, either.

“We have not been able to tour since MCA, Adam Yauch, died,” Mike Diamond said. “We can’t make new music.”, in an article reported by The National Post.

Diamond also outlined how he and Adam Horovitz (Ad-Rock) had also rejected the use of the classic track “Sabotage” in an Arnold Schwarzenegger film by the same name that went on to be a box office bomb earlier this year.

It felt like too much of an endorsement” of the movie, Diamond said, and “we weren’t fans of Mr. Schwarzenegger’s recent … work,” Diamond told the court.

 

Foo Fighters As Yet Untitled Eighth Album Confirmed for November Release On Roswell/RCA

FIRST PEEK AT HBO DOCUMENTARY SERIES FOO FIGHTERS: SONIC HIGHWAYS LIVE NOW AT https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-z8A9P5ziA

“This is a musical map of America.”-Dave Grohl

Nasty Little Man, the Public relations team, recently released a press release stating the following on the Foo Fighters 8th upcoming – and untitled album, for a release in November.

Viewers watching the 29th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony this weekend on HBO were treated to a surprise teaser preview of the new HBO series Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways. The sneak peek-now viewable at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-z8A9P5ziA –features an exclusive Dave Grohl mission statement accompanied by the first passage of music to be unveiled from the as-yet-untitled eighth FF album — out November on Roswell/RCA — and a fleeting glimpse of the HBO series documenting the eight-city odyssey of the record’s creation.

I’ve pulled up the family tree of American music and exposed its roots to find inspiration for the next Foo Fighters album,” says Grohl of the band’s most ambitious effort to date. Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett and Pat Smear tapped into the musical heritage and cultural fabric of each of these cities — Austin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Seattle and Washington DC — basing themselves at a legendary studio integral to the unique history and character of each location. One song was recorded in each city, all featuring local legends sitting in, with every lyric written in an unprecedented experimental style: Dave held off on putting down words until the last day of each session, so as to be inspired by the experiences, interviews for the HBO series, and other local personalities who became part of the process.

If Grohl’s 2013 feature film directorial debut, the universally acclaimed Grammy-winning Sound City, was a celebration of the human element in the creation and recording of music, Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways is, in its director’s words, “a chronicling of a journey to unravel the fabric of our musical identity… not only the making of our most ambitious album… this is Sound City on steroids.” Each episode delves into the singular regional identity of each city, how each region shaped these musicians in their formative years, and in turn the impact those people had on the cultural fabric of their hometowns. Dave’s unequaled passion for both the music he creates and the music that inspires its creation once again fuels the type of honest and trusting musician-to-musician exchange that made Sound City a critical and commercial smash.

Premiering on the eve of Foo Fighters 20th anniversary, Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways aims to “give back” to the next generation of young musicians. As interviewee Buddy Guy puts it, “Everything comes from what’s come before.”

Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways premieres this fall on HBO. For further information and updates, including where and when the series will be broadcast outside the U.S., sign up at http://foofighters.com.

Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways is directed by Dave Grohl for Roswell Films, a division of Roswell Records, the label that releases Foo Fighters’ music; written by Mark Monroe and Dave Grohl. Executive produced by Dave Grohl, James A. Rota, John Ramsay. The series is produced for HBO by Roswell Films and Therapy Content, in association with Worldwide Pants.

Bob Mould – “Beauty & Ruin” – A Track-by-Track Review

Bob Mould – “Beauty & Ruin” – A Track-by-Track Review

            With the new album, Beauty & Ruin is split between 12 tracks, it’s good to think of this record in sides, as in side 1: the beautiful, punk side with heartbreaking lyrics synched with catchy guitar hooks and melodies, and side 2: The hard-core-rocking conclusion that sums up the album, going from sadness on the first track “Low Season” all the way through a war with oneself and others “The War”, and then through the track “Forgiveness” in which the narrator forgives those people, things, and thoughts that may have harmed him in the past. The album flows on through, declaring reconciliation throughout “Let the Beauty Be” and that closing off with the track “Fix It” in which the listener should do just that, for life’s struggles are nothing to procrastinate over.

Low Season   The first track to the follow up of The Silver Age starts with the leaking of a faucet, almost akin to what Mould was probably feeling when writing this track, in which he recently lost his father while writing the track and lyrics. Clocking in at 4:10 minutes, it’s a heavy rocker. As the track progresses, the listener is not opposed to feelings of dread or despair. With lyrics like “Chances that I’ve wasted in my unforgiving days, You were always there, to hear my spirit drown.” as well as being the opening track to Beauty & Ruin, it’s a sludgy-rock opener that is reminiscent of last year’s release of a demo of “Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle” from Nirvana’s Deluxe 20th Anniversary Reissue of In Utero. The lyrics are reminiscent of that of someone whom want’s out of either a defining bad pinnacle within their life, or as well as someone whom brought the narrator/ singer within the song down throughout the course of their life, but are now finally coming to terms with this and kicking this pain in the ass.

The next track is  Little Glass Pill” and clocking in at 3:41 with a jangly- riff that starts off the song, Mould still proves that underneath the fast punk leanings and hard-core styling’s of this track, the melody proves to be the hook from this guitar-based rocker. The narrator throughout the song sings about denial, particularly losing someone you really love, in which this song could be a metaphor regarding his father’s death, not unknown at the time, but still a very tragic loss in which Mould’s feelings of loss, sadness, and losing one’s own hero are clearly portrayed.

The next track, “I Don’t Know You Anymore” which clocks in at 3:58 is a fast catchy rocker, about not knowing someone you used to know. As Bob stated in an interview with Stereogum, it will be the “first proper single from the album.” This track really catches the listeners’ attention about alienation from a lost friend, or enemy.

The next track, “Kid with Crooked Face” is another Hard-core punk song. Mould has certainly never lost his roots in the underground punk scene which he left when pursuing his first solo album and again this second time around with Beauty & Ruin.  This track features heavy hitting drums, akin to sounding like something Dave Grohl would be drumming on.

Continuing on, the song “Nemeses Are Laughing” starts off with a jazz- swing style with Moulds vocals “do-do-do- doo, do-do, do “, then launches into a raunchy guitar riff attack with Wurchester’s drums leading the song. Another song regarding one’s enemies, in which Mould gets the last laugh. 

Speaking in sides, like a vinyl album, “The War” closes up Side 1 of Beauty & Ruin. It is a mid-tempo rocker with guitar leading in, joined by drums, catchy hooks underneath. Within “The War” the narrator instructs the listener to hear their own voice, in which is the only weapon said narrator chooses to use against “The War”. Clocking in at 4:43 minutes, it’s a fast tempo rocker like the rest of the album, with only one short section of verse spoken by Mould at the ending of the track.

Forgiveness” – This track opens up Side 2 of the album and could be seen, interpretively as the aftermath of the previous track. The drums lead in this track, with a syncopated guitar intro, in which Mould’s lyrics then are introduced. A mid-tempo rocker, which includes a piano riff

After that, here comes, “Hey Mr. Grey” in which could be portrayed by the listener as a self-reflection of Mould’s life, or the listener’s life in general, about the new generation of “hard-core rockers” whom presume to think, because of “grey hair” they cannot rock out. A stellar rocking track from Bob Mould, in which his Husker-Du styling and fast/punk dynamics are shown in this track which, is 2:06 minutes long.

Up next is “Fire in the City” – a fast-tempo upbeat rocker that clocks in at 3:16. The song speaks of the troubles within, but also defers these troubles by reconciliation, and is trying to shine a new light on life, to look up and see the future for what it is.

What follows is “Tomorrow Morning“, another fast-tempo hard-core rocker in which the narrator, presumably Mould, proclaims that “Tomorrow Morning” will be a better day, as well as life in general. The song is an addendum to the previous in which Mould is looking for a better, more meaningful reconciliation after the grief and loss of someone close to them.

Let the Beauty Be” – this track starts out acoustically, some reverb and Mould’s voice as the only accompaniment.  The slowest song on the album, and for good reason. After listening to the previous tracks, all of which are hard rocking, tracks, it’s nice to hear Mould speaking directly to the listener about letting the beauty be, and when he sings that, he means just that. Live life and be happy and free. With a backing band that joins in at the 1:35 mark, we can clearly still distinguish the acoustic guitar and hear Mould’s voice clearly throughout the track, something in which most other tracks lack, although was also something purposeful on Mould’s part when compiling the album.

Fix It” closes the album, and brings the listener back to the rough, hard-core styling that Mould is more commonly known for. Although the music may be hard-core, the message is clear- whatever problems you’re facing in life, it is better to fix them than to be at war with oneself or another.

Throughout the album, because of Mould’s current lineup, hearing this record really solidifies how a great power-trio can pack their punches. Wurster’s drumming is akin to Grohl’s drumming on Nevermind and Jimmy Chamberlain’s drumming on “Cherub Rock” from Siamese Dream. Listening to the powerful velocity of the drumming on the record, it was as if Wurster was firing a cannon 1 metre away from your ears.

The musicianship throughout the album really gives off a nostalgic feeling that this is Sugar performing on this album, but also gives it a fresh new insight into both Bob’s world as well as the world around himself.

With a core lineup which includes bombastic drumming on par with Dave Grohl and Jon Bonham, as well as a great vocal performance by Mould, in which many hints of early influences in his younger years come back for a visit, it is a great record for both young and older of Bob Mould who will enjoy this very much.

The album cover (yes, I’m commenting on that too.), is a very realistic representation of turmoil, grief, and greyness that Mould must have been feeling at the time of writing such a passionate, intricate, yet hard-rocking record. The time-lapse of the cover, in which it portrays a young Bob Mould having a cigarette, and then this era’s Bob next to him, clearly portrays the changes he went through both recording this album, as well as the other 11 solo albums he has made throughout his career (not including the Husker-Du albums in his teenage-angst-ridden years.)

The lyrics, like most of Mould’s work are straight and to the point, and as he stated in an interview, some songs, like “Fix It” did not have lyrics until the mixing session of the album. As with most of the albums he has written, the lyrics definitely speak for themselves. Bob Mould still has it, after 30+ years.

Overall rating for this album: 7/ 10, and 3.5/5 Stars

Bob Mould’s new album, Beauty & Ruin is out June 3rd 2014, via Merge Records.

Shonen Knife’s Naoko Talks Influences, New Album “Overdrive”, Nirvana, Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame In AlternativeNation.net Interview

Over the holidays, I contacted the Osaka Japanese punk rock trio known as Shonen Knife. Shonen Knife started out as just a hobby between sisters Naoko (Guitar/ vocals) and Atsuko (drums) Yamano and Michie Nakatami (bass).

Their sound could be described as “The Ramones fornicating with The Beatles while singing songs about peace and happiness with The Grateful Dead.” The band keeps an upbeat image throughout their songs as well as their videos, which is something of a rebellion towards their own culture, in which a female’s role was to follow a strict path.

They soon gathered a following most notably from the Alternative Rock boom in the late 80’s/ early 90’s from bands such as Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore and Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain, who both cited Shonen Knife’s work as influential to their own song writing. With over a 30 year history of the band, I had the chance to conduct an interview over email with the only founding member left (due to line-up changes), vocalist/guitarist Naoko Yamano.

In the interview we discussed the band’s very long tenure, Naoko’s influences, and Shonen Knife’s new album, how they thought of the name “Shonen Knife”, lyrics to the songs, and differences between the American/ Canadian music cultures towards the Japanese culture. Here is what Naoko, vocalist and guitarist of Shonen Knife had to say:

Interview conducted by Osty Gale on January 6th, 2014.

What was it like growing up in Japan in the early 60’s and 70’s?

Naoko: “The 60’s and 70’s were very good years for rock music. Many great bands like The Beatles or KISS were around. For daily life, I grew up in the downtown area and I could buy records in town and listened to radio a lot. There are not so much differences between now and back then except for the Internet.”

Naoko, as you’re the only original member in the band, has your outlook on the band changed over the years since you first formed the band in 1981?

Naoko: “Shonen Knife is continuing to grow. The present lineup is the best lineup in our 30 years as a band.”

Who has been the biggest influence on your career, both musically and non-musically?

Naoko: “Musically, it is The Beatles, as for non-musically, I don’t have any special person.”

How did you come up with the band name “Shonen Knife”?

Naoko: “When we got together as a band, I just happened to see a pencil-sharpening knife with the brand name “shonen knife” stamped on the side, and I thought, “That’s it!” The “shonen” part means “boy”, so it’s kind of cute, and “knife” sounds exciting, so I thought “Shonen Knife” was perfect for our band name and sound.”

What are some contrasts to the mainstream rock songs in Japan to the mainstream rock songs in Canada/ United States?

Naoko: “J-POP’s lyrics are Japanese and the basic melody lines are different. I can’t explain well, though. You can try to listen to J-POP songs through the internet or YouTube. I like rock songs in Canada/ United States.”

With a new album coming out in 2014 of the New Year, what sort of themes and subjects will be on this album? Can we expect a more 60’s-styled Surf Rock album like 2012’s Pop Tune?

Naoko: “The concept and the subjects are not decided. I’m still in the process of writing songs but I’d like to make an album which is enjoyed and loved by many people.”

Does the new album have a name yet?

Naoko: “Not yet. I have to think of it.” [Note: New album is now titled as “Overdrive”]

When does the band usually agree on the album name, track listing, etc.…?

Naoko: “I decide everything by myself. The other band members are supporting me a lot.”

Your songs aren’t typical “songs” in regards to themes such as; love, politics, losing friends or gaining fame. Is this approach to writing themes within your music the conventional style in Japan, or is it centric to your band / other rock acts in Japan?

Naoko: “I don’t want to write metaphysical lyrics. My lyrics are simple and easy to understand. I just like that. I don’t listen to J-POP music and I don’t know the lyrics so much.”

Have you ever thought about writing a memoir or a book regarding the history of Shonen Knife? If so, what would you want it to be called?

Naoko: “We are still on the way to become more popular. It might be better to make a history book after we get famous.”

As a fan of your band, Shonen Knife, and Nirvana I would like to ask if there were there any interesting things that happened on that 1993 tour you did with Nirvana and The Breeders?

Naoko: “The tour was massive and the dressing rooms of Nirvana and us were far apart. There weren’t so many chances to talk with the members of Nirvana. I just remember that there were many people at their dressing rooms and catering cargo was touring with the bands.”

What are your feelings towards Nirvana being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame?

Naoko: “That’s very nice. Nirvana is a great band.”

Looking back on the years of your band, did you ever think you would be touring for over thirty years? What are your feelings towards this?

Naoko: “I’ve never thought I would be continuing the band so long but I don’t look back and I can’t imagine that the thought of “I used to be in this band”. I’m just going to keep making music.”

What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Have you been able to overcome that challenge? If so, how did you overcome it?

Naoko: “Everything for Shonen Knife is the biggest challenge for me. Every show, every recording…”

When you performed in Canada for the first time, what were some things you did not like about the country and what were some things you really did like about our country?

Naoko: “I love Canada a lot. People are kind and so nice to us. Our audience in Canada is very friendly and they rock.”

What was the most impressive show the band has played in 2013, to you?

Naoko: “It was on September 29th at “Dingwalls”, in Camden, London. The show was request set. It was so fun. I wrote a blog about it here:

http://www.shonenknife.net/blog/archives/14474

 In 10 years, do you think Shonen Knife will still be around or will you take up your time to do other things within music or writing?

Naoko: “I can’t imagine. I’m occupied with the present activities of the band.”

In your own words, what makes an amazing writer, whether it is musical writing or just a writer in general?

Naoko: “Creativity.”

What are some new bands and artists that you’re listening to now?

Naoko: “Hmm… I’m studying ’70’s bands now. Please introduce “new” interesting bands to me.”

What advice do you have for people who want to form their own bands?

Naoko: “Keep on rockin’!”

Bad Brains Collaborating With Scream’s Pete Stahl & Dave Grohl

Legendary Hardcore Punk vocalist Pete Stahl, from Scream, uploaded new photos of members of The Bad Brains, and Dave Grohl onto his Facebook page. One of the photos shows himself working in Dave Grohl’s recording studio, Studio 606, alongside the Neve console with members of Hardcore Punk group, Bad Brains. Along with an image of Dave on the skins, he uploaded a shot of some of the lyrics that are speculated to be on the upcoming material from the Bad Brains. You can check out the pictures below:

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More Details On ‘Funk/Punk Birthday Bash Celebration’ Hosted By Dave Grohl

What would your reaction be if you found out Dave Grohl was hosting a spectacular Funk/Punk Birthday Bash Celebration for you? You’d probably be going “Very Ape” in just a “Matter of Time” – no pun intended.

Well that’s what the mighty,recently inducted Rock & Roller is doing for fellow Washington,D.C-area musician Big Tony, most notably a member of Trouble Funk, on May 5th at the 9:30 Club in Washington, D.C!

Pete Stahl, vocalist for Punk band, Scream,whom also will be in attendance and performing at the birthday bash, recently uploaded the gig poster to his Facebook page.

Featured to perform at the birthday bash include Trouble Funk, The Don’t Need It’s (Featuring Darryl Jenifer, Dr. Know, Pete Stahl, and Dave Grohl), plus an unnannounced special guest! The show starts at 8 P.M and advance tickets are on sale in the Washington, D.C Area for $37.50.

AlternativeNation.net Interview With Ian MacKaye, Fugazi Frontman

Interview conducted by Osty Gale

Recently, I had the pleasure to interview Ian MacKaye over the phone. He is one of the founders of the Washington D.C hardcore punk scene that emerged in the early ’80’s. With renowned bands such as Fugazi and Minor Threat, he started the “Straight Edge” edge movement, from the song of the same name, released with his band Minor Threat.

As well as a musician, he is the founder and operator of his own record label, Dischord Records, in Washington, D.C.  In this interview, we talked about the Do-it-Yourself movement, the music industry, the educational and gun control systems within the United States, and his best friend, fellow hardcore founder, Henry Rollins.

So starting at the beginning, can you talk about Washington D.C and what it was like growing up there?

It just is what it is. I don’t have any reference points other than that I grew up here. I think I’m a 5th or 6th generation Washingtonian, so my family, we were born and raised here and I never left. I love it here. So how was it? Yeah it was good I guess, I don’t have any complaints.

What’s your take on the sudden fascination with the DIY movement?  Does it seem a bit odd that people are suddenly taking up a cause for which you’ve been an advocate for years as if it were something new?

I think that your question presupposes that the fascination is something new but it’s not. It’s been going on for years, and people have been interested in this stuff, and there’s always been a minority of course, because the majority our respective nations don’t give a fuckin’ rat’s ass about DIY. But I think the thing is, is that although I may have been one of the early sort-of practitioners of what was called DIY – the truth is that I was not one of the first DIY people, the hippies were the DIY people in the late 60’s and before them were the beatnik poets of the 50’s. DIY is nothing new, it’s just a different name for the underground. And as long as there’s been a mainstream there’s been an underground. So you know, you have the overground and the underground. In terms of expression and culture: Jazz, blues, punk, Rock and Roll, all these things, they’re all coming from the same place and at some point in time they are the voice of a counter-culture and an underground and I don’t see what you refer to as the “current fascination” as being anything new. I see it as what it is; there will always be an underground as long as there’s an overground. In terms of my role within it and how I feel about it, I think that in my life I decided long ago that I was interested in being a Pilot light and it may not always be “hot,” but I’d like to be part of the mechanism that might reignite something. I feel that I was deeply fortunate to come upon the underground and this counter-cultural world, like through music and punk, whatever you want to call it. I feel like I am indebted to it and I like to maintain a pilot light so other people will come across it. You don’t necessarily have to do what I do, but hopefully it’ll be a way for them to learn about it, the same way I learned about it through other peoples work.

Do you have any memories of the first couple of shows you played?

Of course, I remember all of the shows I’ve played. The first show I played, I played bass in a band called The Slinkees. We performed in a garage on Macarthur Blvd in August of 1979, we with a band called The Zones, which was the first show I ever played. The next band I played with was a band called the Teen Idles. From there, it was Minor Threat and then Fugazi. Now my wife and I have our own band called “The Evens.”

Regarding America and its history with gun control, what do you see needs to be done for a more peaceful, controlled nation?

I think guns and all bullets should be destroyed, that’s what I think. But I don’t think that’s going to happen. I don’t like guns, and I’m not interested in guns, nor am I interested in the right to own guns or the right to bear arms; I think that’s just ridiculous. Like a lot of other things, there’s a huge corporate influence that has made everybody go crazy and it’s sort of like – guns kill a lot of people in this country; so do drunk drivers. Drunk drivers aren’t drunk on air, they’re drunk on alcohol. There’s some level where you have to wonder like: What is going on in our culture where alcohol is so ubiquitous where you can’t.. people talk about alcohol like ‘oh look, a new bar opened,’ and they review beer and it’s like an ongoing thing and at some point you have to wonder why/ how this is so pervasive in our societies and you realize it’s because there is a huge amount of money involved. It’s not that I think or feel somebody can’t go buy a drink or own a gun for that matter and I don’t believe that but I do think that there’s a certain point where you have to think what kind of world we’re in when the sort of sheer profit mode ends up influencing society in a way that ends up in so much carnage.

Same with the health care system. The health care situation here in the United States is appalling [with] the damage it does to people. The fact that it’s so expensive that it influences people to be resistant about taking care of themselves. You know, scare people away from the doctor and then they’ve have problems which multiply because they go unchecked and eventually the great irony of this of course is by the time a poor person, whatever their health issue is, [gets the] healthcare they need, their medical situation has fully blown up.  At this point they have to go into the hospital to pay for it, with either Medicare or Medicade. So at that point, the government is paying for it, so essentially it is universal healthcare. The great irony of it is that these three things, that’s ultimately the reason that this country cannot get its mind around something as clear as taking care of each other is because the profit involved is too great. When President Obama reformed healthcare, the people who wrote that reform were working for the insurance companies… So what does that tell you?

But what would I do about guns? If it was me, I would just make them disappear! That’s just me but I can’t do that. I don’t like guns, I don’t have guns, and I don’t need ’em.

It is well-known that you’re best friends with Henry Rollins, since you two grew up together in downtown Washington.  Could you describe to me what it was like first meeting him, and how besides similar musical interests, that you’ve kept that interesting relationship with him all these years?

When I first met Henry Rollins, I thought he was a pretty cool kid with a snake, a BB gun and a bunch of cool records.  I don’t really know how we’ve been friends for all these years. We have a really shared experience with one another. In 1978 Henry and I took a Greyhound bus together, I was sixteen and he was 17. We took a Greyhound bus to California to go skateboarding together, and then we took the bus all the way back. That was about 7-8 days on a fuckin’ bus and we just rolled. It’s not like we always got along. We certainly had some tough patches over the years you know, but at the end of the day we sort of signed onto one another as family.

When the Riot Grrrl Movement that started happening in the early to mid-nineties,  what were your thoughts on it, and what are your thoughts on such a movement happening now?

I knew the people in the beginning of the movement.  I knew the woman who coined the phrase, Kathleen Hanna, she’s a really intelligent woman and I was around for that and I thought it was fascinating and pretty exciting. Like a lot of things though, it got complicated.

You’re known as an avid collector, or shall we say, a preserver, so what are your thoughts on digitizing media, that in the not so distant future could be extinct, in physical form?

I don’t really care about the music industry (laughs).  What I care about is music and I prefer vinyl records, but that’s what I cut my teeth on. I like listening to records, I have a relationship with listening to music on records.  But with that said, I also listen to music on cassette, CD, and computer. If you ask me, I prefer to listen to music on records, that’s just what I’m used to. Music defies formats. Music is beyond formats. Formats are a part of the industry, the music industry, again, something that has enjoyed a monopoly for more than a hundred years so whatever happened in terms of format, it didn’t make much of a difference to me. As I own a record label, it could possibly knock me out of commission because of people not wanting to buy records anymore. Conversely with people and all these digital downloads, it’s weird you know, our bank accounts go up because iTunes wired money into it. We don’t do anything at all. At least when you own a record label you make records; you get them manufactured, you get them housed, you count them, pack them, and ship them.  You do all that stuff and there’s work and you have a tactile relationship with what you’re doing. But with the digital thing, it’s like: you do it one time, and then for you know, in theory at least, from now on. Every time someone downloads something, the numbers in our bank account and website go up. They just go up and we don’t do anything. There’s no way to count them. iTunes could be putting four cents or four million dollars into our accounts and we have no way of proving how many records we’ve sold one way or the other. How do you count a download? How do you hold one? You don’t.

As far as formats go; some people listen to music on cassettes, while others on records. To me, I don’t really care. I’m not really a formatist. It’s just what people want. I assume it will take another form when it’s all said and done.

What are your thoughts in regards to the education system today, as opposed to when you were attending school?

It seems to me, I have a five-year old son, and he’s in Kindergarten. So I’ve been engaging in school for the first time in…I don’t know I haven’t been in school since I was 18. I graduated and never went back to school, so I haven’t dealt with schools until now. So I’m in kindergarten and I’m really seeing how the public school system in Washington works and I’m really stunned to see how much of the privatization of it has occurred with the financial district.

In terms of what they’re being taught, it’s a concern but ultimately for me, is that children have an opportunity to spend time with, who they wouldn’t have spent time with, ever again, if it weren’t for this sort of structure with public schools. The thing with public schools is that, with private schools, you’ve got a commonality; a Christian or Jewish school, or Quaker school, or you’re just rich you know?

Basically, private schools reinforce a bias.  But in public schools, you’ve got a diverse group of people; both rich and poor, black and white, people that would never spend time together forever, and never will again really. But they’re a certain age and they live in a certain area and I think there is something really beautiful about that and something super instructional. It helps people understand what it’s like to be alive, because that’s life! We live in a world. Think of our world as a school: Rich and the poor, and the blacks and the whites, and every other diverse group and we all have to live together and I think that’s good training. I’m not exactly knocked out by all the weird, voodoo-y educational scheme, but I think it’s great that my son is attending school and he’s engaging with all these other little kids.”

What would some advice you would give to an aspiring writer, musician, or journalist starting off in this era of creativity?

As a journalist, I would encourage you to not ask questions about how things feel. Those questions are really difficult to answer and I think that they ultimately usually provoke clichés, so my advice to you would be to really think about questions that are really coming from a fresh perspective. Ask fewer questions about people’s feelings and more about what they’re thinking. People often ask: how does it feel to be the Godfather of Hardcore music? And I’m like “I don’t fuckin’ know, ya know? I don’t know. Or they’ll ask: How does it feel to wake up and be you? I just wake up and be me, I don’t know. My advice to a journalist is to think hard of questions that don’t inspire cliché answers, because we’ve all read those before.

In terms of what advice I’d give to anybody, whether it be a journalist, musician or anybody else is, my suggestion to them is general, but it’s worth considering.  [The suggestion] is: whatever a person decides to do, I would think that he or she should really love it and love the time they spend doing it, because that way if there comes a time in their field where they feel as if they haven’t achieved whatever they think is success then at least they would’ve spent their time doing something they loved, which most people I think don’t do that. Most people are speculating. They’re doing things they don’t want to do and thinking that if they continue that job, that they will get somewhere successful, wherever that is, and then all the while doing this, they’re unhappy. Life is fleeting, so you might as well fucking love what it is that you’re doing.”

What are some bands that you’re listening to at the moment, and do you have any questions for me?

I don’t have any questions for you, but my grandmother, she was a journalist in the late ’60’s and early ’70’s and she would counsel married couples going through a marriage crisis and I’ve been finding these boxes of tapes and trying to organizing them. I’ve been recently listening to these people talk about their lives; it’s been pretty damn interesting!

Thank you so much for your time Ian; it was wonderful talking with you.

Thank you. Good luck my friend, have fun transcribing it!

 

AlternativeNation.net Interview With Henry Rollins, Former Black Flag Frontman

Interview conducted by Osty Gale on November 30, 2013

Henry Rollins is the legendary singer of the Rollins Band and Black Flag, as well as a popular spoken-word artist, author, poet, actor, activist and all-around alternative rock icon. He grew up in Washington, D.C along with his fellow best-friend, Ian MacKaye of Fugazi and Minor Threat fame.

In this interview we discuss everything from friends, to finances, music and writing, as well as the education and gun control systems within the United States. It’s true with what they say – you get what you give. He is a man where his work speaks for himself. You’re all waiting to hear what he has to say so without further ado, Henry Rollins everybody:

First off, with all of these career choices that you ultimately defined yourself with, from working as a manager at a Hagen-Dazs ice cream store to numerous bands, to reporting and covering journalism, what would you call yourself and how would you define yourself?

I am a journeyman worker. I work. That’s what I do. That’s what important to me. I have interesting jobs but I do them all for the same reason. I do them to do them well, complete them and do something else. I am not an artist. I am an Americanist. I survive the day-to-day brutality of America by working hard and smart as I can.

What’s your take on the sudden fascination with the DIY movement? Does it seem a bit odd that people are suddenly taking up a cause for which you’ve been an advocate for years as if it were something new?

It might be something new to someone who is new to it and that’s OK. Perhaps that allows something good to happen. I am not interested in “being there first” or any of that. I think a lot of young people are perhaps encouraged by the latitude afforded by the internet and the communication and efficiency of it.

Your partner-in-crime best-friend Ian MacKaye is a guy you’ve looked up to ever since you’ve been friends with him growing up in downtown Washington. Ian has often described the first time meeting you, could you describe to me your first encounters with him? What, besides musical choices and the fact that he had “his own mind” made you attracted to him and throughout the years, what was it that made this friendship last?

Ian thought differently. He thought for himself, he was a leader. I was not. I learned a lot from him and still do. He was a guy in the neighborhood. We rode bikes and skateboards together and listened to a lot of music. Then Ian started making music and that’s when he really started to define himself. He is a very funny and interesting person. He’s getting better with age. It is perhaps the best thing that ever happened to me, being his friend.

Talk about your interest in gay rights and same-sex marriage. Do you think as an American society, that more people still have to come to terms with the acceptance of it?

To me, it’s a simple constitutional issue, covered by the First, Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments. The way this issue has been tied to religion, blurring the lines between church and state is outrageous and cowardly. I can’t not defend this. I think Americans are more and more coming to terms with it. Sadly for the haters, it’s generational and their Clint Eastwood aged asses are going to be gone soon and we will be moving forward very quickly.

When I think of emotions, they are just that: emotions. They are neither happy nor sad emotions, but the people around us can make our emotions either positive or negative, depending on the circumstance and situation. What do you think of your emotions as a factor of contributing to American society, as well as how you’re perceived now by people when you contribute things like journalistic opinions, music, and spoken word events and/or pieces? Does this affect you in any way?

Emotions don’t matter much to me when trying to make a point. That’s for the tea party. They are emotional. They are angry. At what, they don’t seem to be able to gather the stones to really say what’s on their minds. I think they don’t want to be quoted using the word nigger. As to people’s emotions regarding anything I have said, that’s for them to deal with. I don’t say anything radical or controversial. Literacy, equality, education for all—this is radical? I think not.

With Barack Obama in his second term of presidency, Obamacare is being criticized. Do you think people are not using Obamacare to their full advantage for any specific reason or do you think it’s being doubted because of all the questions that haven’t been answered regarding it yet?

ACA will be fine. That’s why the Republicans are so twisted up about it. If it was going to fail, they would let it. But it’s not and so they are in a tizzy. If more of the states would do their share of the work, there would not be such a strain on the Federal website. This too will be overcome. Republicans fear equality. It will disturb their cash flow and great advantage. It’s coming to an end and they are not happy. Oh well.

What do you think of the American economy, as opposed to other economies that you’ve seen first-hand – South Africa, Darfur, and Iran? Would you say that, as predicted by Wang Jisi, that China will become the next super power because of the debt that America is in with that country (China)? Or do you think that the American government will pull through with their debt?

America is full of money. There are a few people that are really rich and they don’t do anything with their money. Billions of dollars sit still. Everyone else is told to suck it up and work harder and harder. Hey, have at it; keep voting for those who want to abolish the minimum wage. We’ll see how that treats you. People often vote for the politicians whose policies disadvantage them. Again, if that’s what you want, then go for it. There are some people who will have a hard time and there are others who will never be affected. The American government is the people; it’s not some alien body like the tea party wants you to think. It’s not the enemy, it’s us. If it “sucks” then you suck, so improve it or be happy that you suck. Many Americans need to grow up and put their shoulder into it.

Do you feel that, especially in today’s age of an ever-growing technological boom, full of computers and gadgets, the next generation (my generation) won’t be able to look after the environment and that it will go to shit unless we get off our asses and do something, because of this trend of being “slackers” and sheltering ourselves from physically active living more so than in yesteryears?

You will do or not do the right thing. You will have the opportunity to pass or fail. You have all the smarts, tools and energy. We’ll see what you do with the information and the opportunities you have. I don’t know what else to say to an adult. They’re adults, at some point; you take your hands off the wheel and wish them the best of luck.

As a high school graduate, who successfully has had such a vast career with music, journalism, publishing and activism, what are your thoughts in regard to the education system today, as opposed to when you were attending school? Would you consider the work-load too lenient with students or do you think it depends on the school board within their own jurisdiction?

I think America is investing in crime and war. Teach to the test, don’t allow young people to learn to use their minds and you will quickly have millions of people who will fight for shitty jobs, be eager to go to war and haul their asses into new mega prisons. You want a country that is impervious to invasion and destruction from outside, you make it strong on the inside. Read Lincoln’s speech from January 1838, the Speech to the Young Men’s Lyceum. Tells you all you need to know:http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/lyceum.htm. How do you do that, you educate your people. If they are stupid, they will do stupid things. You might want to think about what kind of country you want to live in. It starts with you.

Regarding Black Flag, could you tell me an interesting story, be it funny, serious, or a mix of both tones, regarding a time you were on tour with that band? How did this story affect your life, both positively and negatively regarding the outcome?

Too tired.

What current bands are you listening to at the moment?

Marnie Stern, Thee Oh Sees, Ty Segall, Fuzz, My Cat Is An Alien, High on Fire, Savages. Those are good bands.

Your aggression and abrasive nature are well known and oftentimes completely misinterpreted by members of the press and fans alike, yet there’s an emotional honesty and self-awareness that you seem to exude. How do you approach the misguided critic and/or fan? I know the easy answer is to say “Fuck them,” but there has to be some response you have to those who have these misconceptions about you and what you do and create.

It is up to me to be as clear as I can. If something is not understood, that was my fault and I have to get it better next time. As to critics, I don’t pay any attention to what anyone writes about me. Perhaps if there was something slanderous, like if someone said I had assaulted someone or whatever, sure, but if someone didn’t like my show and wanted to write about it, the First Amendment green lights that and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Based on your experiences, you’re a man of tenacity, a hard working ethic, and dedication. You’ve gotten those skills from working with Black Flag, as well as being an ambitious person, knowing you had to strive to make it. What skills, besides those, have you learned from being on the road, from the 80’s Hard-core Punk scene, up to present day as you’re still touring doing tours with your spoken word performances?

I don’t have any skill really. I have tenacity and a lot of anger. I am an angry person. I don’t want to hit anyone or anything. I want to do things. I want to go. I want to know. I want to do something all the way, finish it and then run at something else and do it and go from there. It’s not about money or fame, it’s about kicking ass and getting onto the next thing. That’s it.

What would some advice you would give to an aspiring writer, musician, or journalist starting off in this era of creativity?

Don’t ask for advice. Just do your thing. I never asked advice. I never asked if I should be in a band and what would happen if it didn’t work out. I went for it. The idea that things were not going to work out was impossible for me to believe. I was ready to die for it. If you have to ask, perhaps you shouldn’t go. For myself, I was not going to be stopped by anything; it never once crossed my mind.

What lies ahead in the future for you, in regards to your life, your hopes, your dreams and your future works; whether it be books, films, or any form or artist media?

I keep things open. We’ll see. I have a lot of things lined up, television, books, film, travel, etc. Hopefully something else will come up to keep things interesting.

Thanks for your time Henry.

It was my pleasure.

AlternativeNation.net Interview With Kim Shattuck, Former Pixies Bassist

This interview was conducted by Osty Gale on January 7, 2014.

Recently I had the privilege to interview Kim Shattuck; who lays down the gut-wrenching, hard-hitting guitar riffs in her L.A punk rock band The Muffs and played bass for the Pixies last year.

In this exclusive interview she discusses The Muffs’ upcoming album, the drama surrounding her firing from the Pixies, Phil Everly and The Everly Brothers, her influences, and she dispels comments made by Pixies drummer David Lovering during our recent interview with him.

What is the biggest misconception about yourself and The Muffs?

People think it’s easy to play our songs. That is until they try to play them. We are more complex than we sound.

On the forthcoming album (untitled as of yet) with a speculated release date of February 14, 2014, would it be plausible to suspect a lot of references to the love/ hate aesthetic that your other songs on previous albums share?

First let me say that the release date for our album is in April or May 2014. The songs are about like and dislike; random thoughts and goofy things.

What was the biggest fear you had when first forming your band in 1991?

I am fearless usually. The way I go through life is pretty carefree and fun. At the time the Muffs started I was pretty sure I was the only person writing good songs at the time. It was 1991 so it may have been true. My only worry was that I needed to get amps that didn’t blow up constantly. That gets old after a while.

What is your biggest fear with your band now, in 2014?

I have no fear.

With over twenty years on with The Muffs, as well as touring previously with The Pandoras from 1985 – 1990, what are some valuable lessons you’ve learned along the way, from finding your own self as well as about the music industry?

We had to learn about managing ourselves. I learned how to produce and engineer our records which saves us a grip of cash. And I no longer have to fight with producers about the sound of our records. We are truly Do-It-Yourself.

As The Muffs will be touring in support of the new album, do you and the band have any supporting acts you would like to share the stage with this year on your tour?

There are lots of great bands out there. I’m very fond of a Los Angeles band called Honeychain.

How did you and your husband, Kevin, meet?

We had mutual friends and met at a barbeque. Then we left the party to go to Bob Odenkirk’s illegal home casino he was doing that night. Kevin won $200 playing craps and then the police came over and scared us all off.

I read an interview you did with John Everson of PopMatters circa ’95, and he described your sound as “Joan Jett singing Everly Brothers tunes with a backing band of The Ramones.” This could accurately describe your style of that years album (Blonder and Blonder), but with the recent passing of Phil Everly, will we see any covers of their tunes on this upcoming tour from the Muffs or a solo song by you?

If I was going to cover the Everly’s I would do it with my sister, Kristen.

Related to The Everly Brothers, have you heard the “Foreverly” album by punk rocker Billy Joe Armstrong & Norah Jones? What is your take on it?

I haven’t heard it yet but I love both of their voices.

As you have a loyal following with the underground punk scene, over the years, have you seen the destruction of other bands (besides Kurt Cobain and Nirvana) and what has that made you think? Are you comfortable with where you’re at with The Muffs right now, or would you eventually want to be bigger than say Nirvana?

My goals are more about song writing and not about popularity at all. We like to do our thing and that’s all I care about doing.

Do you feel that the concept of buying albums physically has died out (whether it is vinyl, cassette, or CD) because of the internet (iTunes, YouTube)? I still frequent used record shops and flea markets because I prefer the sound of original vinyl not made by digital pressings of songs. What is your opinion on it and how do you feel about it?

I buy most of my music digitally but I love vinyl. I like that there are a million different ways to hear music.

Are selecting the right album covers important to you? For you, do you feel as if the album cover may be a sometimes crucial aspect of a consumer buying that album, or do you prefer to use a rather laid back approach like The Ramones (Name of band + image of band) on the front/ back cover?

I am super picky about the way our albums look. I’m picky about every aspect of everything, always.

When deciding on the tracklist order, how do you and The Muffs approach it? Is it a collaborative process or, as mostly the main writer of the songs, do you just say “Here Ronnie and Roy, this is what the track list will be like”?

We all come up with different album orders and then we talk about it. It takes us a long time to figure that out because there’s an art to it and it needs to flow a certain way.

You’ve stated in countless interviews that your sound is influenced by the punk of the Ramones as well as other acts like the Pixies, Kinks, etc., but are there any modern bands that inspire you now?

I’m still inspired by the Kinks and the Beatles.

I interviewed the Pixies drummer, David Lovering, right around the time I was trying to get in touch with you for an interview (last month) and I asked him about those then recently stated comments towards the manager firing you. As you’re still a fan of the band, could you ever see yourself working with them again or was that it for you after Charles said that “The change wasn’t that big of a deal” [in an interview]? – Which ironically, this foreshadowed the events previously when you performed with the Pixies in 2009 because of Kim Deal being ill with the flu.

I just saw the article you are talking about. David says I was unprofessional for saying that I might have been fired for being overly enthusiastic. That’s pretty funny. I didn’t ever say that. That was an online mutation of my original statement. I was asked if I could point to something that in retrospect could have been a turning point in my relationship with the Pixies and I told them about the manager yelling at me after jumping into the crowd at the Mayan in Los Angeles. Since the Pixies had their manager fire me over the phone and no reason was given for firing me, I had to speculate. What would actually be unprofessional is if I told everyone what really went on behind the scenes but I won’t. I know they wouldn’t appreciate their mystique being compromised.

Could you tell me about the first concert you attended, and how did it influence your decision to ultimately want to play in a band?

My first concert was The Go Go’s at the Irvine Meadows in 1982. It was a great show. My friends and I rented a limo and we were only sitting in the lawn seats. It was kind of grandiose. Then somebody who was sitting behind me passed me a cup full of barf. I passed it on to the person in front of me.

What would your advice be to any females, or anyone for that matter, that would want to start a band and make music?

Be true to yourself and learn the business side of things. There are a lot of sharks out there waiting to supposedly help you when they’re really helping themselves to your hard earned money. And don’t chase trends.

How do you feel about the legalization of marijuana in Colorado, and also what are your thoughts on Edward Snowden?

Questions about pot, feminism and Ed Snowden are outside my range of knowledge. I do like Edward Snowden though.

Lastly, what is the best thing about performing in Canada, and do you think The Muffs will ever come to Halifax, Nova Scotia?

I love Canada. I really hope we get to do some shows there. The people are cool. They’re totally funny and creative.

Thank you for the interview Kim.

Hope I gave you enough answers!! Thanks so much!!!

AlternativeNation.net Interview With David Lovering, Pixies Drummer

Photographed left to right: Black Francis (vocals, guitar), David Lovering, (drums) and Joey Santiago (lead guitar) of the Pixies.  Interview conducted by new AlternativeNation.net writer Osty Gale on December 12, 2013.

Recently, before the holiday break, I had the chance to engage in a conversation with David Lovering, drummer of the alternative rock band the Pixies. With a career history spanning more than 20 years, the Boston-formed Pixies have been acclaimed as the most influential pioneering band of the late 80s Alt-Rock movement.

In the interview we discussed new songs, touring, new bassist Paz Lenchantin, and the departures of ex-bassists Kim Deal and Kim Shattuck.

What was it like for you growing in Massachusetts?

It was wonderful growing up there. It’s the only place I really ever knew growing up. It was quite annoying and cold in the winters and everything but you know; it was great. What was an amazing thing to me was that cold in the winters and stuff and when I was old enough to realize that people lived north of me up in Canada, I was like: ‘Are you kidding me?!’ (Laughs) That made me a huge Canada fan. I’ve been a huge Canada fan ever since.

Do you remember your first concert you went to? What was that experience like?

The first concert I went to was Jethro Tull, and that might’ve been in 1979, in Boston. That was my first real concert in an arena and it was amazing. It was fantastic, because I was a huge Jethro Tull fan as well and that’s why it stands out to me so much, and I’ll never forget it.

Who were some of your influences on your drumming technique?

For me, it would be any drummer from Steely Dan, because they’re all session drummers; so any Steely Dan drummer, John Bonham from Led Zeppelin, and Neil Peart from RUSH.

Do you think 2013 [was] a a good year for music, overall?

Oh gosh! I’m not the best person to ask this question. I don’t really listen to a lot of music, the only music that I get to listen to really is music when I’m driving my car, listening to XM Satellite radio. I’m listening to a lot of Haim, an indie pop band from Los Angeles, at the moment. They’re really good and I really like them.

What was the inspiration for the new video “Another Toe in the Ocean”? How did that come about?

What we did was, for every video we did for every song that we’re releasing we hired a different video director to do the video interpretations. We have no say whatsoever in the videos and just let the different directors do their thing. So for every video that has come out so far, has been their own interpretation. As for the video, I really like it. I really like the cartoon character in it; it looks like Charles (Pixies lead singer) in the video.

As far as setlists for the North American Tour go, will we be seeing any new songs that will be released in the future?

Yes we do! What we’ve been doing so far for the past 2 months on the European tour, we’re doing EP-1 and we’ve been doing other songs as well. So we’ll be playing new songs that people might not be familiar with, even when EP-2 comes out sometime soon [the band released it last week]. So there will be new songs as well.

What are your feelings towards working with all these different bassists since the departure of Kim Deal (Founding Pixies member, left in June 2013)?

Oh it’s wonderful! Of course, no one will replace Kim, it’s impossible to do that. But we hired Kim Shattuck (The Muffs), she was hired to do the European tour, and now we’ve got Paz Lenchantin (A Perfect Circle) who’s going to work with us straight into the new year of 2014 coming up. It’s been fantastic. It’s a fun experience and it makes it interesting! It’s different for me, because I’ve played for… oh gosh… a number of years with Kim, so it’s interesting to perform with new bass players. It keeps me on my toes I’ll say that. (Laughs)

As a band, what factors led you to choosing Paz Lenchantin as a replacement for bassist Kim Shattuck?

She’s fantastic! She has got the chops and she’s a wonderful woman so she’s got it all going for her. She’s actually really, really good. It’s one of those “Top Bassist’s in the World”- types of things, and she’s even getting me to perform better.

What do you think she will bring to the band in regards to studio releases?

We actually just talked about that when we were in rehearsal; Joey Santiago (lead guitarist), Paz (bassist), Charles (vocalist) and I. We were talking and said: “Wow you should bring in your violin.” There’s an old song we performed for many years called “In Heaven” that we recorded on our demo tape back in March of ‘87. We were just thinking like “wow, this would be a good song for Paz (bassist) to play violin on.” So we’re just throwing the idea around of her performing violin on that. That would be tough to do, because a lot of the Pixies songs are bass-driven and it would be tough for her to get away from that performing on another instrument. So a song like “Heaven”, we’re doing it in an instrumental type of way, where she can do it with her violin. I don’t know if this will ever come to fruition but we’re talking about it right now.

What is your view on the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame nominees this year? Who do you predict will get the award?

Oh God… This is a tough one, I just don’t know. Well RUSH finally got in and I’m really happy they did. Cheap Trick, I don’t know if they got in, I hope they did. Cheap Trick is one of my favorite bands. I think they might’ve been inducted, I don’t know. I know Nirvana might be inducted this year, I don’t know when we’ll be inducted. I’d like to see that happen someday. It would be nice.

Regarding Kim Shattuck’s comments about being fired for being “over enthusiastic”, what are your feelings towards her comments and what did you think when you first heard this statement?

As a gentleman, I’ll say it was unprofessional. It was coming from a different place.

Well, that’s all the questions I have, thank you for your time David. Happy Holidays and I’ll be attending your North American kick-off show in Toronto on January 15th.

Perfect Osty, thank you so much! As for the tour we’ll be really up to speed with Paz. Happy Holidays in the coming year. It was a pleasure speaking with you and Happy Holidays until we see you in Toronto.

You can download the Pixies’ new EP’s on PixiesMusic.com.  The Pixies kick off their North American tour in support of EP-1 & EP-2 on January 15th at Massey Hall in Toronto.  Interview conducted by Osty Gale.