See How Much Money Alice In Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, Marilyn Manson & Faith No More Make

Billboard Boxscore (via Metal Injunction) has reported recent gross sales for Alice In Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, Marilyn Manson, Faith No More, and Melvins concerts. You can see the numbers below!

Artist: Alice In Chains
Venue: Oakland, CA – The Fox Theater
Date: Jul. 24th, 2015
Gross Sales: $138,600
Attendance/Capacity: 2,800 / 2,800
Ticket Prices: $49.50

Artist: Alice In Chains
Venue: Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium
Date: Aug. 07th-08th, 2015
Gross Sales: $265,077
Attendance/Capacity: 4,506 / 4,506
Ticket Prices: $59.50, $49.50

Artist: The Smashing Pumpkins & Marilyn Manson
Venue: Las Vegas, NV – The Joint
Date: Jul. 10th, 2015
Gross Sales: $313,578
Attendance/Capacity: 4,136 / 4,136
Ticket Prices: $200, $135, $75, $59.50

Artist: Faith No More & Napalm Death
Venue: Austin, TX – Austin Music Hall
Date: Jul. 26th, 2015
Gross Sales: $165,937
Attendance/Capacity: 3,250 / 3,250
Ticket Prices: $52.50, $49.50

Artist: Melvins & Le Butcherettes
Venue: Chicago, IL – Double Door
Date: Jul. 08th, 2015
Gross Sales: $13,750
Attendance/Capacity: 550 / 550
Ticket Prices: $25

Alternative Nation attended a Smashing Pumpkins and Marilyn Manson concert last month. Read our review below!

Smashing Pumpkins and Marilyn Manson performed at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine, CA last night for their second End Times tour show, and Alternative Nation was in attendance to review and photograph the concert.

Marilyn Manson went on at 8PM sharp, kicking off with “Deep Six.” Manson was very talkative during his hour long set, at one point explaining that his coat ‘cost him a blowjob.’ He also gave a shout out to his father, and then he started talking about a doctor who said he was crazy, but that crazy is good. He later talked about being a sinner, and said if he couldn’t be the devil he would join him by sin. He said he did not get beaten up by the devil, and that he also could not reach up and punch God. He then said, “If you want to say fuck Jesus, make it personal.” This led right into a cover of Depeche Mode’s “Personal Jesus.” He wore an American flag on his head during the “Personal Jesus” cover. He also thanked god for doing good and bad.

He also proclaimed, “People thought I was sarcastic when I said it, but rock ain’t fucking dead” leading into “Rock is Dead.” I read through all of these notes on Manson’s on stage banter to a couple of fans and to Alternative Nation reporter Elias Fulmer, and they seemed impressed that I managed to write all of this down in my iPhone notepad. Apologies for any inaccuracies.

Manson’s voice was strong for his heavy rockers like “Disposable Teens” and his scream sounded strong as ever. His voice was hit and miss during some more melodic verses with some mumbling, but his unique (and bizarre) rock and roll swagger made up for it. “The Dope Show” was definitely the highlight of his set.

In between Manson and The Smashing Pumpkins I picked up some food and saw a rogue bunny running around the venue. There was also a cute kitty cat on my Smashing Pumpkins photo pass that I hope to get signed someday by Billy Corgan’s cat Mr. Thom. Or maybe Diamond Baby? Or Angel Face? Tough choice. I need to make the puuuuurfect pick. Our reporter Elias then gave a letter he wrote to Billy Corgan to a security guard, who claimed Billy got it. We’re fully expecting a response letter to publish on Alternative Nation.

The Pumpkins, with Jimmy Chamberlin back in the fold, went on at just after 9:30. I had previously seen The Smashing Pumpkins 4 times (September 2007 on the Zeitgeist tour, December 2008 on the 20th anniversary tour, and October 2012 on the Oceania tour), and with all due respect to Mike Byrne, the Pumpkins did not have the same sense of power the time I saw them in 2012 without Jimmy Chamberlin. While the Pumpkins’ 2008 show I saw (one of their last with Chamberlin at the time) featured some ridiculous stuff like a 20 minute Pink Floyd cover and a kazoo encore, Corgan and Chamberlin’s chemistry somehow made it work (except for the fans in the audience who just wanted to hear “The World Is A Vampire” on repeat).

The set kicked off with three hits: “Cherub Rock,” “Bullet With Butterfly Wings,” and “Tonight, Tonight.” Corgan thanked the audience and said, “As you know the more I talk, the worse it gets, so I’m just going to play music tonight.” The setlist featured many hits from the band’s career mixed in with new songs, and this was a very smart move. Corgan has challenged audiences in the past by playing 30 minute jams (“Gossamer”) and debuting a new album live front to back (Oceania), and while those were brave endeavors, it seems like the Pumpkins found the right mix setlist wise with this show to please an amphitheater/arena audience, while avoiding becoming a nostalgia act like most non-Pearl Jam Grunge bands have become. Corgan played several seminal hits while also working in the best new songs from Monuments to an Elegy. The mix really worked when “Run2Me” and “1979” were played back to back. The songs compliment each other, and surrounding newer songs with hits that are in the same sonic range really seemed to help the newer songs fit seamlessly into the set. “One and All” also had a lot of passion, with Jimmy Chamberlin really pushing Corgan. Corgan’s vocals in general were on point the entire show, even moreso than the other times I’ve seen.

Jeff Schroeder ripped during the “Ava Adore” solo. Schroeder has really grown into becoming a key part of the band, so much so that I don’t see why anybody would want James Iha to return to replace him. James was a key part of the original lineup’s chemistry, but Jeff Schroeder is the best guitar player The Smashing Pumpkins can have in 2015. His chemistry he has built with Corgan in the last 8 plus years was apparent during the acoustic “Landslide” cover, and the track was one of the highlights of the show.

The new, somewhat poppier version of “The Everlasting Gaze” was another highlight, it really breathed new life into a 15 year old song, and made it work in a way where Corgan didn’t have to try and scream constantly pretending like he was still 30. The chemistry of the band’s new lineup (Corgan, Schroeder, Chamberlin, and bassist Jack Bates) really blossomed during “Thru the Eyes of Ruby.” “United States” closed the main set, and it was further proof that Jimmy Chamberlin is still the greatest drummer in the world. It might have been the loudest song I’ve ever heard at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine.

The band then returned for the encore, and Billy Corgan introduced his bandmates. He joked that after “1979” was performed, the Laker fans left (the Los Angeles Lakers are an NBA basketball team for readers who don’t follow sports). He then clarified that he meant ‘the third quarter Laker fans,’ and not all Laker fans. Corgan then said he was going to make a Deandre Jordan joke (Jordan is a Los Angeles Clippers player), but he was deciding against it. He then joked that Jordan had signed with his hometown Chicago Bulls, in reference to Jordan recently backing out of a deal with the Dallas Mavericks. Corgan then said Marilyn Manson isn’t a sports fan, followed by praising his ‘brother.’ The Pumpkins then closed their show with a visceral performance of “Geek USA,” followed by a jovial Corgan greeting fans before he left.

Jimmy Chamberlin’s drumming is the balls of The Smashing Pumpkins, and even with the core of the band (Corgan, Chamberlin, and Schroeder) all being over 40, the Pumpkins are still capable of rocking harder than most bands half their age. I was very hesitant to see the Pumpkins without Chamberlin during his 6 and a half years away (which is why I only saw them once), and this show was further proof that Billy Corgan and Jimmy Chamberlin need to stick together for good this time. With Jeff Schroeder in tow, that trio can make The Smashing Pumpkins a live act to be reckoned with even as they near 30 years into their career.

Overall The End Times show was very enjoyable, and it felt a lot more vital than other tours featuring other 90’s bands touring together. Manson and the Pumpkins seemed to have a big cross section audience (unfortunately full of aging Gen X’ers, Billy is going to need to write his own “American Idiot” to get some ladies besides the cougars coming out) so the audience loved the show. Our reporter Elias told me after the Pumpkins’ set, “That was straight spiritual, and I don’t even like using that word.” Rock ain’t fucking dead.

Noel Gallagher Has A Stalker: ‘She Isn’t Attractive’

Noel Gallagher recently discussed Oasis performing at Manchester’s Maine Road in 1996.

Speaking about the occasion to TalkSport, Gallagher said: “I was thinking: ‘I definitely want a chimp after this, and a top hat and a mirror Rolls-Royce and a couple of stalkers.'”

He then went on to reveal how he has actually experienced trouble with stalkers in the past. “I have had a stalker, yes,” he said, adding: “She’s German, actually.”

Noel continued: “She’s a proper lunatic. Breaking into hotels and stuff, shouting underneath the door, as I’m calling my security guard saying, ‘Get this head case out of here!’ and she’s like, ‘I know you’re in there!'”

The former Oasis guitarist continued to describe the individual as “not the most attractive woman” but that it “wouldn’t change anything” if she was.

Noel Gallagher was asked about the chances of an Oasis reunion during a recent interview with the Irish Examiner.

“On a scale of 1 to 10, what would it be? 1 being the lowest? I don’t know, that’s it, that’s it. I am fully aware that the NME have made a big deal about that, because they have fuck all else to write about. What can I say?”

When asked if he’ll seccumb to the pressure of his brother Liam and Paul McCartney trying to get him to reunite Oasis, Noel didn’t seem to care what McCartney thought.

“I don’t give a fuck about what anybody called Paul has to say about anything,” quips Gallagher, adding that he’s really tired of the question.

Chris Cornell On Soundgarden: ‘There’s No Need To Make The Statement Of Broken Up’

Chris Cornell discussed Soundgarden’s 1997 break up, what he learned from it, and the current status of the band in a new interview with Zane Lowe’s on Beats 1, as transcribed by Alternative Nation.

Lowe asked Cornell if it feels like there’s an open door when it comes to Soundgarden, and if they can come back whenever they want, and if they’ve already crossed that bridge.

“Yeah, we’re already doing that. I guess this is where I started with this conversation was the fact that I can do an album like Higher Truth, and these acoustic tours to support it, and the songwriting that is on it. There’s no confusion between that, and what we do in Soundgarden, and how I write with those guys, or by myself for Soundgarden, there’s no confusion between the two. You can be a fan of one and not the other, or the other and not the one, or both, and it’s OK.”

“Mostly good things came out of the hiatus, but I did learn a lesson, which is there is no need to make the statement of broken up.”

He added, “There’s no point in it. The thing about a solo career, and solo album, ongoing solo projects, is that can’t break up.”

Cornell also discussed the ups and downs of Soundgarden’s live show. “There’s an element to Soundgarden that I maybe didn’t even really understand until we had 12 years off and got back together, it was like the first day in a rehearsal room, suddenly I remembered, that there was this sort of swirling chaotic quality that ends up just starting to happen in the room. It reminded me of shows in the past where if there was too much of it, it was bad, and if there wasn’t any of it, that was even worse, really. Because then all of a sudden it is just sort of these clean rock songs, and there’s nothing special. Then live, we sort of push it even further, where I won’t start singing when I’m supposed to, then the rest of the band takes that as a cue to sort of go off and do whatever, and then we all kind of don’t really worry about how it comes back. When you do that in front of people, when you are completely lost in front of an audience, and they see that, and they see you kind of come back, they are sort of part of it.

Dave Grohl ‘Didn’t Want To Pollute’ Nirvana’s Songwriting Process

Dave Grohl recently discussed Nirvana and the formation of Foo Fighters in an interview with Deadline.

“Because I was in a band with Kurt Cobain, who was the greatest songwriter of our generation. I didn’t want to pollute that process. To me, music … one thing I discovered, which we touched on in that episode is, you have hobbyists and careerists and what happens is, the hobbyists are more likely to go out on a limb and take chances because they are doing it solely for the passion of experience. Careerists might have some other motive that could create some kind of boundary or barrier—the idea that I don’t want to do that because it might not be good for my career. My entire life … when I was a kid growing up in Springfield, VA, there wasn’t really any career opportunity in music. I was either going to become a drywaller or work at the furniture warehouse, where I worked for years. I’m a high school dropout, so I didn’t imagine I was on some fast track to stardom, in my bedroom in Springfield, VA. So everything I’ve done is really just for the sake of having fun, experiencing music. The whole time I was in Nirvana, I was recording stuff in my basement. But I didn’t let anyone hear it, because I didn’t need to. Because I heard it. I didn’t feel like I was keeping this incredible secret; it was just stuff I did in my basement. That was the beginning of the Foo Fighters. It was like a coming out, like, ‘OK, I also do this.’ The Foo Fighters is a band that was born out of … just survival.”

“These were all musicians who’d been in bands that ended prematurely, and we weren’t done yet. There was some really heartbreaking history behind us, but we had a lot to look forward to. And so that was really our greatest motivation. It wasn’t that we wanted to become the biggest band in the world. We just wanted to continue playing music. We maybe told a bit of that story in the Seattle episode, but in that one and the one in Washington, where you see where I grew up, those were really personal episodes. I had to temper that personal, emotional side and not let that get in the way of telling all those other beautiful stories. I had to let Seattle be Seattle. Seattle is not me; I just have a little bit of history there. In order to make those episodes connect, I had to tie that emotional string to it.”

Watch Alice In Chains Play With The Real Rooster, Jerry Cantrell’s Dad

Earlier this month, Alice In Chains performed “Rooster” with an introduction from the the real life Rooster himself, Jerry Cantrell’s Dad, Jerry Cantrell Sr. Cantrell Sr. was the inspiration behind Alice In Chains’ 1992 classic “Rooster.”

Jerry Cantrell said, “I’m going to play this next song for my pop. Want to come up and say hi Dad?” He added, “Jerry Cantrell, ladies and gentlemen.”

Jerry’s Dad came up and said, “Oh dang, how you doing? They got a lot of people out there, and a lot of cold beer.” He added,”I remember last year I rolled my horse over here. This year, I rode a big, bad, Harley.” Cantrell then praised the crowd and said, “Let’s hear it for Alice In Chains!”

Mark Pellington discussed directing the 1993 “Rooster” music video in a 2014 retrospective with Alternative Nation.

“So I heard the song, and I spoke to Jerry, and he told me what the lyrics were about. I was like, ‘Oh, fuck yeah.’ Then again it just kind of poured out of me, and it was a companion piece to ‘Jeremy,’ I look at it as very much a cousin to ‘Jeremy.’ I wanted to get the real deal with the ‘Rooster’ video. I said, ‘Let’s shoot it where your Dad is, let’s make him part of the process.’ It was not dissimilar to Matt Shultz’s wife in Cage The Elephant’s ‘Cigarette Daydreams’ video. You’re kind of personalizing it, because the story is the most authentic if it’s the most personal.

We recreated the Vietnam shit, which was really cool. It was kind of a documentary portrait of Jerry’s father who had alienated him and kind of had PTSD. The video has multiple elements: Jerry’s personal involvement in it, band performance, which is a good little thread, and then the recreation stuff. So you have four elements interweaving, and a big ambitious 6 minute song that can hold that kind of weight. They were certainly a very weighty band. They were big, and heavy, and strong. They could hold it, and the song could hold it, this was a big piece and statement, sonically and emotionally. It was a great experience making that.”

Foo Fighters Fan Was Crying Because He Just Buried His Mother

NME reports that Anthony, the fan who cried during “My Hero” at a recent Foo Fighters show and was invited onstage by Dave Grohl, called into KBCO to explain why he cried.

Explaining how he was feeling at the gig, Anthony said: “My mum died about six months ago and I just got back from Europe putting her in her crypt. “He (Grohl) started singing it and I felt all emo.”

Unafraid to admit he was crying, Anthony was however keen to establish the fact that he was not drunk on the night; though he may have been stoned. “I was dead sober,” he said. “I don’t drink. I might have had a little Colorado green but I’m not a drinker.”

“I was crying, I’m not afraid to cry,” Anthony added. “I started getting all teared up. I was trying to hide from him.”

Alternative Nation reported earlier this week that Foo Fighters were performing “My Hero” acoustic in Greenwood Village, Colorado, and Dave Grohl spotted a fan crying in the crowd. See our transcription below!

“Don’t cry motherfucker, I know you’re drunk, don’t cry. Are you crying right now? You’re fucking crying aren’t you? (Laughs) I love you man, look at you, holy shit. You know what, fuck that speech I was just going to make, I’m singing this shit to you right now. I’m gonna sing this fucking song right in your face, man to man, prison style, I’m going man to man. Me and you, I want some real tears, you better sing it with me. (Laughs) Don’t make me cry, because I promised I wouldn’t do this.”

“Get closer, get front row! Where are you going motherfucker? Get back here! No you get here, front row. I’m going to sing this to your crying grown man ass right now. Front row, against the rail, right here, get in here motherfucker, you drunk emotional mess!”

At first Grohl hesitated to bring him on stage, but then he invited him. The fan identified himself as Anthony. Grohl then serenaded Anthony, singing “My Hero” to him and making him continue to cry. Anthony also sang part of the song with Grohl. Grohl joked that nobody should let Anthony drive home, and he also hugged him multiple times.

Axl Rose’s Reason For Being Late: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

UPDATE: Big Rig, the DJ in question, contacted Alternative Nation and said that while the story about Axl being late because he was watching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is true, the fan who heard the radio show got the date, promoter and venue wrong, confusing the information on the venue with another story.

A member of the community reports that a DJ of a Tampa Bay radio station recently told a hilarious Axl Rose story. Axl has a reputation for being late to concerts, and the reason he reportedly was late for a show in the Tampa area on December 28, 1991 was that he was watching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

The DJ was an assistant to the owner of the venue, and needless to say the owner was getting pissed. When the owner asked why Axl was being late for the thousandth time, he said: “Axl’s management said he was watching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze, and that Axl’s attention was 100% on the movie and couldn’t be bothered.”

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Rose was infamous for being late during the Use Your Illusions tour, while his bandmates were also struggling with drug addiction at the time. According to Wikipedia, The Riverport Riot was a riot which took place on July 2, 1991 at the Riverport Amphitheater (now named Hollywood Casino Amphitheater) in Maryland Heights, Missouri (near St. Louis) during a concert by the American hard rock band Guns N’ Roses. It is also known as the “Rocket Queen Riot.”

During the band’s performance of “Rocket Queen”, the 15th song in the set (counting drum and guitar solos), lead singer Axl Rose, in the middle of the chorus, pointed out a fan who was taking still pictures of the show, saying “…Hey, take that! Take that! Now, get that guy and take that!” When security was unable to deal with the person, Rose decided to confiscate the camera himself, saying “I’ll take it, god damn it!” and then jumped into the audience and tackled the person. After taking the camera, striking members of the audience and the security team, and being pulled out of the audience by crew members, Rose grabbed his microphone and said “Well, thanks to the lame-ass security, I’m going home!”, slammed his microphone on the stage and left.

The sound the microphone made sounded to some fans like a gunshot. After Rose left, lead guitarist Slash quickly told the audience, “He just smashed the microphone. We’re out of here.” This infuriated the audience, setting off a riot in which dozens of people were injured. The footage was captured by Robert John, who was documenting the entire tour for the band. Rose was charged with having incited the riot, but police were unable to arrest him until almost a year later, as the band went overseas to continue the tour. Charges were filed against Rose but a judge ruled that he did not directly incite the riot.

Rose later stated that the Guns N’ Roses security team had made four separate requests to the venue’s security staff to remove the camera, each of which were ignored, that other members of the band had reported being hit by bottles from the audience and that the venue’s security had not been very strict, allowing weapons into the arena and refusing to enforce a drinking limit. Consequently, Use Your Illusion I and II’s artwork featured a message amidst the Thank You section of the album insert: “Fuck You, St. Louis!”

Courtney Love & Gerard Way’s Adorable Birthday Messages For Frances Bean Cobain

Frances Bean Cobain celebrated her 23rd birthday earlier this week, and she had some adorable Twitter interactions with former My Chemical Romance frontman Gerard Way and her mother Courtney Love to mark the occasion. Courtney sent Frances a heartfelt message: “Happy birthday my sweetest baby girl, I’m so proud of you.” Frances responded, “Thanks for letting me utilize your human form to act as my alien incubation pod for 9 months. Love you mum XX.” Love also tweeted a photo of a baby Frances with her and Kurt Cobain, saying she misses Kurt. See the tweets below!

Director Brett Morgen discussed Frances Bean Cobain and Kurt Cobain’s mother Wendy O’Connor’s feelings on the drug use depicted in the new documentary Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck in a new Deadline interview.

“When Kurt’s mother voiced some concerns about the way she was depicted, and the way Kurt was seen in the latter stages of his life, it was Frances who called and said, ‘Mom, Grandma, this is not your film. This is Kurt’s film, and how you experience things is quite different than the way Kurt experienced things.’ I think the point was if we allow our mothers to dictate the content of our biographies they would be pretty nice. I mean of course the mother doesn’t want to show her child in any light that’s less than favorable, but it was Frances’s desire to not hide the truth, and I think that both Frances and I arrived at the same point, which was we were not trying to tear Kurt or put Kurt down, nor were we trying to put him on a pedestal. We were simply trying to look him in the eye, to empathize, to find a point of entry in which we can understand how he experienced life.”

Morgen also discussed Frances’ feelings on her father after watching the film.

“This is considered an authorized documentary, and by that it suggests that we received access to the primary source material, but as you and I both know, ‘authorized’ has a negative connotation. It generally means watered-down or censored. We live in an era in which brands and the state have a tremendous monetary value, and so there is a great need by the rights-holders to protect that investment. At our first meeting, after we shook hands, I sat down at a table with Frances and before I could pitch her the film I wanted to make, she proceeded to tell me that she thought that whatever film was constructed it should lean heavily on Kurt’s art, and if nothing else, it needed to be honest. What she went on to say is that during her travels through life, people are constantly coming up to her talking about Kurt as if he was some sort of mythical character, like a unicorn or a Santa Claus, and she said, ‘You know, the best way we can pay tribute to Kurt is to create a film that is honest. That is what Kurt was about, honesty and integrity, and so don’t shy from the truth.’ Upon seeing the film for the first time, Frances looked at me and said, ‘do not touch a frame.’ You know, before she said that, she said, ‘Thank you for giving me a couple hours with my father that I never thought I would have.'”

Listen To Clip Of New Kurt Cobain Punk Song

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck director Brett Morgen recently uncovered a previously unreleased Kurt Cobain punk song, and he released a clip of the song on his Twitter account.

LiveNirvana.com asked Morgen on Twitter: ‘When do u suppose it was recorded? Can u tell us anything abt the tape it was sourced from/any known songs compiled w/ it?’

Morgen responded, ‘are you geeking out? Had you heard it b4? I just came across it yesterday. Wait until you hear the demo we added to the film!’

A previously unreleased Kurt Cobain track was added to the new theatrical cut of Brett Morgen’s documentary Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck. While the track does not have an official title, the only clearly decipherable lyrics are ‘I’m a bad man,’ so we have used that as a tentative title for this story. Another lyric Alternative Nation was able to make out is: ‘What’s the cause for my seed?’ The track features Cobain screaming in a falsetto, and sounds like the Pixies more than any Nirvana song. The song also features the “Jerry Garcia” riff.

The track features the classic Nirvana ‘loud/quiet/loud’ song structure, with the distortion turned up for the chorus. There is a poppier vibe to the song though than most of Nirvana’s material, especially with Cobain’s falsetto.

Major Update On New Alice In Chains Album

Bassist Mike Inez revealed that Alice In Chains are working on riffs for their next album, the followup to 2013’s The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here. Inez told Rock 103 (as transcribed by Alternative Nation):

“We’ve been throwing around riffs for a new record, we’re taking it nice and slow, and we just wanted to get out of the house this summer, and just play. It’s funny, we’re still like brothers to this day. I met Alice In Chains when they opened up for us when I was in the Ozzy [Osbourne] Band in 1992. The album had just come out, their old bass player quit, so I was over mixing the double live Ozzy album with Ozzy, we were in the studio trying to get that done, then I get a call from these guys. They said, ‘Hey meet us in London, fill in for Mike [Starr].’ At the time, we thought he was just going to go home for a short period. So I flew over to London, I learned like 18 songs, we did I think 28 gigs, 32 days, in 16 countries. That was my jump into the fire [scenario].”

The Press of Atlantic City reports that the new album is expected to be released in late 2015.

Billy Corgan On Covering Miley Cyrus With Marilyn Manson: ‘We Could Make It Dark & Cool’

Smashing Pumpkins’ Billy Corgan discussed almost covering Miley Cyrus’ hit “Wrecking Ball” with Marilyn Manson during a recent VIP Q&A, as transcribed by Alternative Nation.

“Actually, he might get mad at me for saying this, but we were gonna do two songs: ‘Girls Just Wanna Have Fun’ and ‘Wrecking Ball.’ (Laughs) Swear to god. It was just one of those things like, rehearsal, he’s over here, we’re over there. When it came down to it, we just didn’t find the time to do it right. I certainly didn’t want to go out there and half ass it, because I knew his set was going to be good. He felt the same way too, I knew his set was going to be tight, our set was going to be tight, and then to end on kind of a messy karaoke, it would only work if we had the time and the fortitude to dial in and get it just right. His version of ‘Sweet Dreams’ is amazing, his version of ‘Personal Jesus,’ he makes it his own, just like we make ‘Landslide’ our own or something.

If we weren’t gonna get there in the time that we had, because I wanted it to actually be cool and respectful, and not they’re just pissing on these songs. It’s like misogyny equals whatever, they’re making fun of Miley, it was actually the opposite, we were going to celebrate these songs, because we thought, in our hands, we could actually make them vicious, dark, and cool.”

Filter frontman Richard Patrick also recently discussed Miley Cyrus in a tweet responding to an Uproxx article. Patrick tweeted: “I know I married but I’m not dead.. Is Miley going to let us see those beautiful boobies?”

Dave Grohl Reveals He Suffers From Social Anxiety

Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl recently revealed during an interview with GoldDerby that he suffers from social anxiety. He discussed the issue when talking about attending the Emmys.

“It’s just going to be such a crazy night, I just can’t imagine. I think I’ll feel like that kid who is the new kid at school, the first day at school. I’ll probably just sit down, with my back up against the wall, just nervous, and waiting to see who is going to want to talk to me. I have a little bit of social anxiety. It might seem hard to imagine, but in rooms like that, I kind of clam up. I mean put me at the fucking Grammys, and I know everybody there, and I’ve got a bottle of whiskey in my hands the whole time, but we’ll see what happens.”

Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways, the HBO series, has been nominated for 4 Emmys.

Dave Grohl recently told GoldDerby that he had dinner with the surviving members of The Beatles, and that Ringo Starr told Grohl that he was a fan of the Washington DC episode of Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways on HBO.

“It was an exciting episode for a few different reasons. One, because that’s my home town, and I grew up with all of these incredible musicians. My biggest influences, and my real heroes, are all musicians from Washington DC that most people don’t know about. So, not only did I get the opportunity to tell the story of this amazing city, with these amazing people, and the amazing music that was made there, but I also got to sort of shed light on a city that most people wouldn’t consider a musical city. You go to Chicago, you know that you’re going for the blues, you go to New Orleans, you know you’re going to get jazz, you go to Detroit you’re going to get soul, R&B, and Motown. But DC, people are like what the fuck, whatever happened in DC? So that was really exciting, to be able to tell people about Go-go music.

Not longer after that episode came out, I went out to dinner with Paul [McCartney] and Ringo Starr. Ringo was like, ‘Man, I watched the DC episode, I love Go-go!’ I was like, oh my god, I just turned Ringo Starr onto Go-go music!”

Watch Jane’s Addiction & Metallica Members’ Surprise Lollapalooza Performance

Perry Farrell (Jane’s Addiction/Porno for Pyros), Robert Trujillo (Metallica), and Peter DiStefano (Porno for Pyros) performed with the School of Rock All Stars at Lollapalooza 2015, and video has now surfaced of the performance. Watch “Ocean Size” and “Mountain Song” below.

Perry Farrell gave advice to young musicians during a new interview with SPIN. Farrell said, “Play music. Go play clubs, go play parties, play a hot dog stand. If sounds like it would be fun and it will bring you around more people, then that’s a good place for you. If you want to make a career out of [music], then you have to be very crafty but stay honest and decent.”

“Don’t be in such a hurry. If you slow down and you’re good company, then you’re fine. Life is great. You don’t have to rush. You don’t have to step on anybody’s head. Don’t worry about your position in life if you look around and see you’re in good company.”

“Major labels don’t respect the group. They don’t look at them on the level of art and say, ‘I respect you so much, I want to do this for you, I’m good at it.’ They look at you as if you’re a slave, working for them. They’re your master, and if you don’t do a good job, and if you don’t bring in money right away, they throw you away. You can’t trust a major label. It’s tough out there.”

Interview: Mark Tremonti Says Alter Bridge Will Record In 2016, Talks Creed’s Future & Cauterize

How many times have you seen an artist successfully pioneer three different legitimate bands over the course of their career? (Maybe just Chris Cornell?) As most know, Mark Tremonti, the lead guitar player and songwriter from Alter Bridge and Creed, also has a solo project he simply calls Tremonti. Their first record, entitled All I Was, came out in 2012 and was supported by months of touring. Upon completing the last Alter Bridge cycle, Tremonti was back to work on his next solo effort, Cauterize – released in this past June. The record’s third single, “Radical Change” hit airwaves this week. There was so much solid material during the recording sessions, that it actually spawned solo album number two and three, with Dust slated for release in early 2016.

Although Tremonti has always stuck to his roots and deep love of metal, the difference in his solo work is that he has shuffled about five yards to his right and taken over as the lead singer for the first time in his career. Calling in from his hometown of Orlando, Alternative Nation had the chance to catch up with Mark a few weeks prior to kicking off his fall North American tour. As part of the upcoming show experience, he is giving fans a once in lifetime opportunity to not only watch his jaw dropping shredding skills, but also shred alongside him through a special pre-show lesson offering.
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You’ve basically started a successful band 3 times over, all within a similar genre of music. That’s pretty rare.

It’s kind of a life cycle for me. It just seems normal. You start from the bottom and work your way up. It’s a thrill for me to be the underdog. I try to make the projects as different as I can with the tools I’m given. I think the biggest help for me, is having a different rhythm section. And the fact that, with the solo stuff, I get to throw in a little more metal.

My biggest challenge was making Alter Bridge sound different than Creed. That was the first time that I really had to reinvent myself as a songwriter. The first step was having a singer who sounded like the polar opposite of Scott Stapp.

What was it like going from playing large sold-out stadiums to small clubs again?

I enjoyed it. There’s something about playing clubs that’s just fun and exciting. Playing amphitheaters is amazing, playing arenas and stadiums is great too, they are all fun in their own way. It would be a shame not to enjoy them all. Even if all three bands were at an arena level, I would still throw club dates into the mix though.

How different is it for you being a lead singer as opposed to the lead guitar player?

It’s a whole new skill set. It’s not something you can practice at home. You get experience by practicing live in front of people. I always have my eyes and ears open to watch how others entertain a crowd. I’m not really like that when it comes to guitar playing. It’s a new thing for me to be a frontman. I never used to pay attention to what singers do, and now, I have to think of something different to do every night. Slowly but surely, it’s getting better for me, but when I first started it was like “oh no, what do I say in between songs?” I never got into this to be an entertainer. I’m the farthest thing from a David Lee Roth or a Scott Stapp. Myles Kennedy has turned into such a good frontman. I’ve seen him develop and that’s what I hope to do as well.

With your Tremonti band, was the plan always for you to be the frontman or were you initially looking for someone else to sing?

I was definitely planning on singing it. I’ve been a songwriter since I was a little kid. I’ve always loved writing vocal parts; it’s always been my favorite thing to do. One of my biggest griefs as a songwriter is that people always think it’s the singer who wrote the vocal melodies when I’ve written so many of them. People just think you’re playing the guitar so you just wrote the guitar parts. When the guitar solos and the riffs aren’t really what get me excited about writing the songs, it’s the vocal parts that I now get to sing myself.

Had you ever been a singer before?

I’ve always just been the backup and harmony guy. On the third Alter Bridge record, I took a lead in a song called “Words Darker Than Their Wings,” where Myles and I would go back and forth, singing the verse. On the newest Alter Bridge record, I sing a lead on a song as well. Then three records now, I take on the lead vocals with the Tremonti stuff.

As a songwriter, how are you able to determine which song is better suited for Alter Bridge and which you keep for your solo material?

Unless it’s a real deep metal sound, it’s all up for grabs. Whatever is up next at the moment, I usually put the song towards. Once I figured out if it’s an Alter Bridge or Tremonti song, then I adapt more towards that band. Usually if it’s an Alter Bridge idea, it’s easier to take more of an atmospheric type of approach because Myles will deliver a certain vocal part. When it’s fast, up-tempo, double-kick riff stuff, that tends to go towards the Tremonti band.

What’s the writing process in Alter Bridge? Do you write the music and Myles writes the lyrics?

We both write the same way. I’ll sit and write parts. I’ll have a verse with filler lyrics and a melody in place. Myles will do the same thing. I may bring in a verse and chords, and then he’ll have a bridge that matches that. I’ve gotten to a point where I’ve gotten good at organizing my ideas. I’ll give it a name, I’ll give a beats-per-minute, a dynamic based around the tuning it’s in and the time signature. If I then need a part, I know how to shuffle through my ideas, let’s say if I need a verse that is specifically 110 beats per minute. Myles and I will never write whole songs and present them to one another. Almost every album, we’ve contributed to every song and had our own parts in.

You wrote all of the first Alter Bridge record – One Day Remains correct?

That’s the only one that is different. I was kind of under the gun to write a record for when Creed was breaking up and Alter Bridge was getting together. Myles was coming in and four or five of the songs where completely written, then the second half of the record we worked together. Then with Blackbird, he picked up the guitar and that was our secret weapon going forward, adding him on the guitar.

When you started Alter Bridge, was it that you Scott Phillips and Brian Marshall were forming a new band, looking for a singer and Myles Kennedy was the “winner?” Or was it more that you wanted to form a band with Myles?

When all the signs were showing that Creed was coming to an end, I just started racking my brain. My best friend had a Mayfield Four CD and reminded me of how good a signer Myles is. We had only done a handful of shows with them. So this was years later, my buddy played me the song “Summer Girl” and I was just blown away. He was definitely our first choice for singers to go after. I had also reached out to a talent agent who had a recommendation as well. He said this was a “top guy” and would fly down. It ended up being my cousin’s husband’s brother. (laughs) He sounded awesome. Kind of like a Bon Scott, he had this big voice, but Myles was just a tough a guy to beat. He was the choice no matter how good anybody was.

What’s next for Alter Bridge?

I’m touring with Tremonti through the end of the year, and then the plan is to do an Alter Bridge record the first three months of next year. It always takes a few months to put out an album, mix and master it. That’s when we’ll split off again and Myles and I will go off and do our touring with Slash and Tremonti, and then come back together for a couple weeks of press before the Alter Bridge tour kicks off.

Have you spoken to Scott Stapp recently?

We actually just ran into him. Scott Phillips and I were at the Hard Rock hotel for my wife’s birthday, and just by strange coincidence, Stapp was up here during a vacation and was staying at the Hard Rock. We were walking out to the pool and he saw us. We ended up talking for an hour and half. He was clean and sober and doing well. He was happy. His family seemed happy. We’ve had a few texts since then. I think there’s talk about Wind-up Records maybe putting out a box set, so I’m sure we’ll communicate to make sure that turns out well.

Do you foresee any potential to reunite Creed again?

My life is just so busy right now it would be hard for me to do anything else. There were some songs we worked on before things went south. On the last tour, we didn’t see eye to eye to say the least, and then we put a halt on any new music. We had already gotten about nine or ten songs ready to go. It just doesn’t make sense for me though, having two new Tremonti records, a new Alter Bridge record and Myles will have a new Slash record. A new Creed record would be just too much stress.

On your upcoming tour, you have a very unique offering where fans can get a one hour guitar session with you before the show? Will you be doing that before all 32 shows?

Yeah, I do it at every show date. We say it’s an hour but it really goes almost two hours. There will be a room set up where I have two amps and everyone comes in and gathers around. I’ll ask what people want to go through and want to learn if it’s a smaller group. If it’s a larger group, I’ll go through alternate tuning techniques, vibrato techniques, picking techniques and how to go through sonic ideas. We work slowly because there are all kinds of different skill levels. I’ve had beginners and I’ve had Berklee students. Everything from jazz players to metals players. It’s funny, you see so many people who are nervous to plug in their amp, but then when they do they’re great. We also go up on stage and I walk them through my rig. We’ll end by doing photos standing up on stage. It’s always a good time, I’m glad I started doing it.

There’s a second record from your Cauterize recording sessions, entitled Dust, waiting in the wings. When will that be released?

It’s going to be a time early next year. After we record the Alter Bridge record and we have that three or four month gap, I’ll be looking to tour on it to support it. We’ll probably hit the States and Europe before we get going heavily with Alter Bridge. Even still, there will be gaps in that schedule that will allow me to tour on Tremonti as much as we can.

What was the process in deciding which songs go to Cauterize and which go to Dust?

I wanted to make sure both albums flowed dynamically. If there were two slow moody songs, I’d put one on each album, same thing if there were two really heavy aggressive songs, I’d split them up evenly. There’s isn’t a specific theme to one or the other. Each record is mixed.

The song “Arm Yourself” on Cauterize, it’s remarkable how melodic the chorus is over such a heavy riff.

That song was developed around that chorus. I had that idea around for a few years. I remember playing it for Myles and he loved it. That’s why it’s good to also have a solo band. There are so many ideas that get passed over and never get on a record, that are just sitting there and perfectly good enough to make it on a record, but there just isn’t enough time in a day to finish them all. So that was one of the first ideas I brought back when working on this album. When we did pre-production, that was our producer’s least favorite song. We all looked at each other like “you’re crazy, that’s one of our favorites.” By the end of the recording process when it was time for me to cut my vocals, he was like, “this is fun one, I think everyone’s going to be excited about it.” And I said “I told you! You just needed to give it time.” Now it’s one of the fan favorites and one of the five tracks we’ve already started playing live.

Looking into your entire catalog, what songs jump out at you as some of your personal favorites?

I’d say “Blackbird” is probably the number one song for me. I think for everybody in the Alter Bridge camp, that’s their favorite song. Even looking at both Tremonti and Alter Bridge, I still think “Blackbird” is the best of them all. On the Tremonti records, “Wish You Well” is definitely the most fun to perform live. We end the set almost every night with that song, so it’s one of my favorites as well.

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Manager Said ‘Layne Staley Is Alice In Chains’ When Replacement Was Suggested

David de Sola’s new book Alice In Chains: The Untold Story gives new details on the Nancy McCallum v. Alice in Chains Partnership et al. lawsuit, which was filed in King County Superior Court on May 2, 2013. According to de Sola’s book, Nancy Layne McCallum alleged in a lawsuit that at one point in the mid-1990’s, Layne Staley told her he was “contemplating withdrawing from the band to address his health issues, but that Susan Silver, the band’s manager, was pushing back by reminding him that there were 40 people on the payroll counting on him to write and perform.”

She further alleged in the lawsuit that “during an ‘intervention’ with Mr. Staley, Ms. McCallum questioned the need for her son to continue to write, perform and tour with the band: ‘Why couldn’t the band audition for a replacement lead singer?’ In response, Ms. Silver told Ms. McCallum, ‘Nancy, you don’t understand; Layne IS Alice in Chains.”

Dave Grohl Has Dinner With The Beatles

Dave Grohl recently told GoldDerby that he had dinner with the surviving members of The Beatles, and that Ringo Starr told Grohl that he was a fan of the Washington DC episode of Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways on HBO.

“It was an exciting episode for a few different reasons. One, because that’s my home town, and I grew up with all of these incredible musicians. My biggest influences, and my real heroes, are all musicians from Washington DC that most people don’t know about. So, not only did I get the opportunity to tell the story of this amazing city, with these amazing people, and the amazing music that was made there, but I also got to sort of shed light on a city that most people wouldn’t consider a musical city. You go to Chicago, you know that you’re going for the blues, you go to New Orleans, you know you’re going to get jazz, you go to Detroit you’re going to get soul, R&B, and Motown. But DC, people are like what the fuck, whatever happened in DC? So that was really exciting, to be able to tell people about Go-go music.

Not longer after that episode came out, I went out to dinner with Paul [McCartney] and Ringo Starr. Ringo was like, ‘Man, I watched the DC episode, I love Go-go!’ I was like, oh my god, I just turned Ringo Starr onto Go-go music!”

Kurt Cobain’s Mom & Frances Bean Clashed Over Drug Use In ‘Montage of Heck’

Director Brett Morgen discussed Frances Bean Cobain and Kurt Cobain’s mother Wendy O’Connor’s feelings on the drug use depicted in the new documentary Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck in a new Deadline interview.

“When Kurt’s mother voiced some concerns about the way she was depicted, and the way Kurt was seen in the latter stages of his life, it was Frances who called and said, ‘Mom, Grandma, this is not your film. This is Kurt’s film, and how you experience things is quite different than the way Kurt experienced things.’ I think the point was if we allow our mothers to dictate the content of our biographies they would be pretty nice. I mean of course the mother doesn’t want to show her child in any light that’s less than favorable, but it was Frances’s desire to not hide the truth, and I think that both Frances and I arrived at the same point, which was we were not trying to tear Kurt or put Kurt down, nor were we trying to put him on a pedestal. We were simply trying to look him in the eye, to empathize, to find a point of entry in which we can understand how he experienced life.”

Morgen also discussed Frances’ feelings on her father after watching the film.

“This is considered an authorized documentary, and by that it suggests that we received access to the primary source material, but as you and I both know, ‘authorized’ has a negative connotation. It generally means watered-down or censored. We live in an era in which brands and the state have a tremendous monetary value, and so there is a great need by the rights-holders to protect that investment. At our first meeting, after we shook hands, I sat down at a table with Frances and before I could pitch her the film I wanted to make, she proceeded to tell me that she thought that whatever film was constructed it should lean heavily on Kurt’s art, and if nothing else, it needed to be honest. What she went on to say is that during her travels through life, people are constantly coming up to her talking about Kurt as if he was some sort of mythical character, like a unicorn or a Santa Claus, and she said, ‘You know, the best way we can pay tribute to Kurt is to create a film that is honest. That is what Kurt was about, honesty and integrity, and so don’t shy from the truth.’ Upon seeing the film for the first time, Frances looked at me and said, ‘do not touch a frame.’ You know, before she said that, she said, ‘Thank you for giving me a couple hours with my father that I never thought I would have.'”

Listen To New Kurt Cobain Song “I’m A Bad Man”

A previously unreleased Kurt Cobain track was added to the new theatrical cut of Brett Morgen’s documentary Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck. While the track does not have an official title, the only clearly decipherable lyrics are ‘I’m a bad man,’ so we have used that as a tentative title for this story. Another lyric Alternative Nation was able to make out is: ‘What’s the cause for my seed?’ The track features Cobain screaming in a falsetto, and sounds like the Pixies more than any Nirvana song. The song also features the “Jerry Garcia” riff.

The track features the classic Nirvana ‘loud/quiet/loud’ song structure, with the distortion turned up for the chorus. There is a poppier vibe to the song though than most of Nirvana’s material, especially with Cobain’s falsetto.

After reports of a tentative September release, Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck director Brett Morgen has revealed to Deadline that the new Kurt Cobain solo album will be released on the same day as the DVD of the film

“It will come out November 6th, the same day as the DVD release.”

While digging into Cobain’s archives, Morgen expected to find some undiscovered gems, but not only did he discover spoken word audio of Kurt recounting his own teenage suicide attempt, but “hours upon hours of never before heard Cobain music.”

How did it feel to hold the objects of such worldwide fanatical interest in his hands? “I could not possibly understand how this existed and nobody had encountered it before,” Morgen said.

Billboard recently reported that a previously unreleased Kurt Cobain demo would be added to the August 7th theatrical release of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck. Director Brett Morgen refused to reveal when in the film the track would appear due to fear of fans filming it with their cell phones, but he did reveal that Cobain sings in a Beach Boysesque falsetto. The song doesn’t have a name, but was likely recorded in 1991 because it appears on a tape “on which he was also working on ‘Old Age,'” which was written during the Nevermind sessions and later rewritten and recorded by Courtney Love and her band Hole.

The lyrics in the track are unclear but it sounds like Cobain sings “Wonder how I breathe” and “I’m a bad man.” There are 30 to 50 demos from 107 cassette tapes featuring 200 hours of audio that Morgen had to work with.

“Kurt played around with sound collage, particularly with panning effects,” in which the record appears to move from one speaker to another, Morgen says. “And it’s a sensory experience that really envelops you.”

Dave Grohl Sees Foo Fighters Fan Crying, Invites Him To Sing “My Hero”

Foo Fighters were performing “My Hero” acoustic in Greenwood Village, Colorado last night, and Dave Grohl spotted a fan crying in the crowd. See Alternative Nation’s transcription below!

“Don’t cry motherfucker, I know you’re drunk, don’t cry. Are you crying right now? You’re fucking crying aren’t you? (Laughs) I love you man, look at you, holy shit. You know what, fuck that speech I was just going to make, I’m singing this shit to you right now. I’m gonna sing this fucking song right in your face, man to man, prison style, I’m going man to man. Me and you, I want some real tears, you better sing it with me. (Laughs) Don’t make me cry, because I promised I wouldn’t do this.”

“Get closer, get front row! Where are you going motherfucker? Get back here! No you get here, front row. I’m going to sing this to your crying grown man ass right now. Front row, against the rail, right here, get in here motherfucker, you drunk emotional mess!”

At first Grohl hesitated to bring him on stage, but then he invited him. The fan identified himself as Anthony. Grohl then serenaded Anthony, singing “My Hero” to him and making him continue to cry. Anthony also sang part of the song with Grohl. Grohl joked that nobody should let Anthony drive home, and he also hugged him multiple times.

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Alice In Chains’ William DuVall: “I Am Not Layne Staley”

William DuVall discussed replacing Layne Staley in Alice In Chains in a new MCall interview.

“It’s all about doing justice to the material,” DuVall says. “I try to get to the root of the song and make it work. I love those older songs just as much as the fans do. I always respected Alice in Chains. I’m in a unique situation but there have been other musicians, who admired bands and somehow ended up in the group.”

“There was no one like Layne,” DuVall says. “I’m not Layne, but I’m playing the music of Alice in Chains to the best of my ability and I can’t think of anything I would rather do. We’ve worked very hard together to get to that next level. The bottom line for me in this band is to just be myself. I can’t be anybody else. Fortunately the fans have been good about that. They understand and we appreciate their support.”

“Alice in Chains is far from a one-note band,” DuVall later said. “There’s a lot of different moods in the songs. I love singing the old ones and I’m having a blast with the new ones.”

“We’re having a great time together,” DuVall says. “We’re on the same page and we want to continue to create and tour. Why stop now?”