PEARL JAM’S MONTANA SHOW COULD LEAD TO MORE VOTES, CAMPAIGN MONEY FOR TESTER

Tonight, Pearl Jam played a rare show at the Adams Center in Missoula, MT, not too far from Jeff Ament’s hometown of Big Sandy. This wasn’t an ordinary gig though. A handful of tickets were sold through Senator Jon Tester’s website; according to this article, those who paid $250 for a ticket got an evening reception with Pearl Jam, and those that parted with $500 were able to eat pizza with the band, Tester, and anyone else who shelled out that cash.

Once again though, Pearl Jam flexed its political muscle, its appearance there in part garnered to get younger people interested in voting, particularly in the race between Tester and candidate Danny Rehberg, which is getting close.

“I can’t tell you how important it is to vote,” Ament said. “I think that particular campaign really made me realize how empowering it is to vote and what a difference one person can make.”

The fact that Eddie Vedder managed to raise over a million dollars during a recent Obama rally certainly isn’t lost on Tester, and it’s likely he’s hoping that something similar could happen for him.

“It’s no surprise that after raising $1.7 million for President Obama, Pearl Jam would come to the aid of Sen. Tester, who supports Obama 95 percent of the time in Washington,” said Rehberg spokesman Chris Bond about the concert.

 

DAVE GROHL ON FOO FIGHTERS’ FUTURE: “I DON’T KNOW WHEN WE’RE GONNA DO IT AGAIN”

Here is an update to our Foo Fighters’ taking a break from live shows story.  Dave Grohl said the following at the Global Festival last night regarding Foo Fighters’ future, according to KROQ:

”Without making a big deal out of it, we don’t have any shows after this… honestly, I don’t know when we’re gonna do it again.”

BILLY CORGAN SAYS HE ALMOST KILLED HIMSELF ‘THREE OR FOUR TIMES IN MY LIFE’

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan was on Last Call with Carson Daly on Wednesday and discussed contemplating suicide in the past. During the new interview with Daly, Corgan revealed that he almost killed himself three or four separate times in his life. He also said he planned what he would leave behind and what he would write. He said realizing God had always been with him is something that helped save him, and make him no longer feel like a victim.

MATT CAMERON FIGHTS BACK AGAINST BILLY CORGAN’S ALLEGATIONS ABOUT SOUNDGARDEN

Not too long ago, Billy Corgan made the comment that Soundgarden was simply reuniting for the money, and although it may have taken some time, Matt Cameron is fighting back. When asked about Corgan’s remarks on a radio interview for Pittsburgh, PA’s WXDX-FM, Cameron remarked:

“I watched a couple of interviews that he did, kind of recently, where he was just talking about the current music scene, and I kind of agree with him on a lot of stuff,” he said. “I think Billy’s a super-smart guy. I personally would never, sort of, begrudge another musician for having a gig. Because that’s kind of what we do this for. Ultimately, we do it for ourselves as artists, but when you can connect with an audience, small or large, that’s kind of what keeps you going.”

Cameron also stated: “I mean, I certainly understand why people would question bands that reunite… So, I’ll just leave it at that.” Source

CORE 20TH ANNIVERSARY: RETROSPECTIVE ON STONE TEMPLE PILOTS’ EARLY DAYS

Photo of Stone Temple Pilots in 1992.  Core was released 20 years ago today.  This article is a GrungeReport.net exclusive and features a new interview (read the full interview here) I conducted with former Stone Temple Pilots manager Steve Stewart.

Stone Temple Pilots’ beginnings can be traced back to the mid 1980’s.  Scott Richard Kline was born on October 27, 1967 in Santa Cruz, California to parents Kent and Sharon Kline.  His parents divorced when he was two, and his mother quickly remarried Dave Weiland, who adopted Scott and gave him his surname Weiland.  Scott mainly grew up in Chagrin Falls, Ohio and spent his summers in California with his biological father, the back and forth took its toll on him emotionally. After Scott’s stepbrother Craig was hit by a car and died in California, his biological father became detached from him, and the summer visits became less frequent.  Weiland and his family later moved to Huntington Beach, California when he was 14 years old and he began attending Edison High School.  During his time at Edison he initially played a lot of sports but he was a hard partier and never quite felt like he fit in, his partying eventually led his parents to put him in a psych ward for three months and have him carted off from school.

During Weiland’s formative years his musical influences were very diverse, he was a chameleon from the start.  His first musical influence as a child was country music, listening to Hank Williams with his father in his car.  He often credits his father for teaching him how to sing.  In middle school John Lennon and David Bowie became two of his major influences along with R.E.M.  At Edison High Scott met Corey Hickok while playing football, who turned him on to records by The Jam, Echo and the Bunnymen, Stiff Little Fingers, and The Buzzcocks.  Scott also began to attend local Orange County punk rock shows seeing bands like Social Distortion during his teen years.  Corey played guitar, and he and Scott quickly formed a postpunk band called Awkward Positions. The two eventually formed Soi-Distant.  Soi-Distant featured Weiland, Corey Hickok on guitar, bassist Dave Stokes (Scott Tubbs at one point), keyboardist Britt Willits, and drummer Lonnie Tubbs.  Weiland stated in a July 1987 interview with Gig Magazine, “A lot of bands are writing about social problems, we write on a more personal level.”  Weiland and the band’s look and sound were influenced by Duran Duran’s first album, The Cure, and U2 with a punk edge.  Soi-Distant played all around Orange County in Huntington Beach, at clubs in Newport Beach like Déjà Vu, and at a frat house at UCI in Irvine.  After high school Weiland attended Orange Coast College but quit to focus on his music career, he had a high GPA but later stated they didn’t teach classes on being a successful recording artist.

While Scott Weiland was working on his musical chops, bassist Robert DeLeo was in Point Pleasant, New Jersey playing with his older brother Dean, five years his senior.  Dean’s band played in bars, but Robert was so talented the band let him in and snuck him in to play shows.  One day Robert decided to pick up and leave New Jersey and move to California.  He lived out of his car initially in the Long Beach area with no music gear, but he eventually got an apartment and a home eight track studio after inheriting some money.  DeLeo, whose biggest influences were James Jamerson and Led Zeppelin, met Scott Weiland at one of Soi-Distant’s gigs in Orange County, joining the band to perform a song.  Weiland was blown away by DeLeo’s talent, but it took awhile before he could finally get him to form a band with him.  Sometime in late 1987/early 1988, Soi-Distant dissolved and morphed into Swing, the first incarnation of Stone Temple Pilots.  Guitarist Corey Hickok and keyboardist Britt Willits initially remained from Soi-Distant, and the lineup was rounded out by ¾ of the STP lineup we have come to know: Scott Weiland, Robert DeLeo, and drummer Eric Kretz.  There was also a drummer named David Allin, a high school friend of Scott’s, who played drums before Kretz. The details surrounding his time in the band are vague. Scott and Robert had seen Kretz performing with another band, and were impressed and immediately asked him to join their band.  Kretz was from San Jose, California and attended Willow Glen High School. DeLeo eventually decided that they didn’t need a keyboardist, and they became a four piece.  The band were based in Hollywood but played in Los Angeles and Orange County.  Swing had more of a funk and hard edged alternative rock sound than Soi-Distant, one of their early songs was called “Drop the Funk.”  Dean, Robert’s older brother, moved to San Diego in the mid 80’s and became a successful businessman.  He had given up the guitar, but helped out the early version of STP get some gigs down in San Diego.

By 1990, Robert told Scott that Corey Hikock had to go and they needed a new guitarist.  While Scott was hesitant to fire his close friend from the band, deep down he knew they needed a different guitarist.  Corey cried when told the news, but he understood why they had to do it.  The guys convinced Robert’s brother Dean to join them, and in their first ever jam session with him they wrote the 8-minute epic “Where The River Goes,” which later ended up on the band’s debut album Core.  By 1990, the band’s name was Mighty Joe Young.  They began recording demos in mid 1990, with the initial demos leaning more on the band’s funk influences from their previous incarnation as Swing.  Steve Stewart, who managed STP from their early days up until 2000, remembers, “I shopped that tape for the first record deal. It’s true, the band’s sound was much more ‘LA funk’ than what came out on Core in 1992. Except for Where The River Goes. The demo version of that track (which is on the cassette) is one of my favorite STP songs. Thick and tasty – I think it sounds better than the album version on Core, but it’s pretty much unchanged.”  By late 1990/early 1991 STP began to form the signature sound they would later have on Core, recording demos of Wicked Garden, Naked Sunday, Piece of Pie, and Only Dying.  Crackerman was also written during this time period.  The full demo tape featured these songs along with some of STP’s funkier numbers like “Dirty Dog” and “Scary Area.”  During the band’s early days, they relentlessly played the club scene, Steve Stewart says they played “pretty much every club in southern California. Raji’s, The Shamrock, the Golden Bear – all the Hollywood and O.C. venues.” They also opened for bands like the Rollins Band, Ice T, and Soul Asylum.

The band had jobs to make ends meet.  Weiland chauffeured models (including his future wife Mary, who was 16 at the time) and got a graphics job by pretending to be a student at the Otis School of Art and Design.  He drove a 1986 Nissan pickup at the time.  For a time Robert worked occasionally as a counter clerk in soda fountains, he later worked at a record store.  Weiland and Dean DeLeo lived together for a time in a flat in Los Angeles, which they believed to be haunted.  The band was thirsty to get outside of Southern California, and when the Seattle Grunge scene broke out in late 1991 and record labels began seeking out alternative rock acts, STP would finally get their shot.  Steve Stewart recalls the band getting signed by Atlantic Records in April 1992, “The band was signed off the Mighty Joe Young cassette, when a very hard-working A&R guy at Atlantic named Tom Carolan came to see them after hearing from his best friend Don Muller, to whom I had given a demo tape and invited to a show. Don became their first booking agent and is one of the top music agents in town today. Tom’s immediate boss was Jason Flom, who also believed very much in the band. Danny was being brought in to run Atlantic on the west coast at that time and was also there for the signing.”

The band all quit their day jobs and began working on Core.  They chose Brendan O’Brien to produce their first album. O’Brien helped the band hone their sound and stay focused on their angsty alternative rock sound that was featured on their Wicked Garden, Where The River Goes, Naked Sunday, and Only Dying demos.  Steve Stewart recalls, “Yes – the best rock producer of that era, Brendan O’Brien, had a lot to do with that. Robert asked me to find him and inquire about producing Core. At that point, the LA scene was dominated by bands like the Chili Peppers and Fishbone, etc., while Seattle was starting to come into its own with a post-punk, stripped-down version of rock.”  O’Brien would go on to produce STP’s first five albums.  Scott Weiland was obsessed with The Doors while recording Core, with Jim Morrison being his main influence.  As the band were finishing the album and deciding on artwork, their lawyer told them that an old blues singer named Mighty Joe Young was making a comeback, so they had to change their name.  Weiland always liked the initials STP from the motor oil logo, and the band initially joked around about the idea of renaming the band Shirley Temple’s Pussy.  They eventually decided on Stone Temple Pilots.

Core was released on September 29, 1992 with the lead single “Sex Type Thing.”  Sex Type Thing was an anti-rape song, with Weiland singing from the perspective of a macho rapist.  In a September 1993 interview with SPIN magazine Scott Weiland recalled the creation of Sex Type Thing, “Dean was out in the front yard of his house in San Diego, washing his car or something, and he was, like, listening to some old Zeppelin song [In the Light].”  Dean described his memory of coming up with the guitar riff and being influenced by the Led Zeppelin song, “’Duh bug ngaow, buh-neh-neh-nah- neh-neh-nao-nhe’ except because the music was inside and I was outside, it sounded different. You know how you can hear music sometimes in a different way? I heard it ‘buh-neh-buh-neh-buh-neh,’ which is like the riff idea to ‘Sex Type Thing,’ and ran in and hit it out on the classical guitar.”  Weiland’s first impression of the riff was, “The first time he played it for me over the phone, it reminded me of an old-style Sonic Youth-ish kind of riff. And when he told me how he got the thing, I was tweaked. Hey, I write songs that way, too.”  Dead and Bloated’s guitar riff was based on an idea Scott Weiland hummed to the band, while the lyrics to “Plush” were written by Weiland and Eric Kretz while they were in a hot tub.  The song was about a woman who had been murdered.  Two of STP’s first shows from the Core era were performing two shows on a side stage at Lollapalooza 1992, Scott Weiland said his voice was hoarse and it was two of the worst shows the band ever played.  At the shows Robert DeLeo introduced himself to Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder and Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell, both ignored him and shunned him, angering DeLeo.  Core exploded by early 1993 when the Grammy winning “Plush” became a mega hit, and with STP’s new found fame the tensions with their contemporaries up in Seattle increased.  Eddie Vedder told Rolling Stone in 1993, “Beth (Vedder’s first wife) and I were part of the scene in San Diego. We knew what was going on, which was not a lot. Those guys are supposedly from there? I have never heard of them.”  Vedder’s remarks were off the mark, since the full STP lineup featuring Dean DeLeo did not start playing live shows until August 1990, a month before Vedder moved to Seattle.  The band were also based in Los Angeles contrary to media reports, while also playing shows in San Diego and Orange County.  Vedder also claimed Weiland was “coppin his trip.”

These ripoff accusations infuriated STP, who had spent years formulating their sound and paying their dues playing clubs.  Weiland told Metal Hammer Germany in 1994, “I think he burnt his mouth on that one. It’s funny. Dean, my guitarist, has been living in San Diego for ten years. Neither he nor his friends have heard a whole lot about Vedder. As a matter of principle I find it arrogant for a musician to talk down about others. But I have nothing against him, I don’t even know him. His band plays this classic rock that’s too boring for me anyway.”  Weiland was more diplomatic about Vedder in a 1993 interview with Rolling Stone, “I have a lot of respect for Eddie Vedder and the ideals and things he stands for.  As an artist, he’s very valid. But I never really thought that if you put us next to each other, we looked like Siamese twins or anything.  I mean, visually, onstage, I kind of liken myself to a disco-dancing Frank Sinatra – a cross between Perry Como and John Travolta.”  Robert DeLeo also added, regarding the comparisons of STP to Seattle bands, “People get so shallow, thinking that you grabbed your influences from the bands that are out now.  Wouldn’t anybody stop to think that we’re all the same age and we all grew up on the same kind of music?”  Dean DeLeo joked in a May 1993 Metal Hammer Germany interview, “We’re planning to go on tour with Pearl Jam and Alice In Chains, so people can compare us immediately.”

With a hit record, by summer 1993 it was time for STP to plan their first big tour.  The band were offered a chance to open for Aerosmith on an arena tour, but turned it down.  They wanted to play smaller venues that held 2,000-5,000 fans with cheaper ticket prices.  So they put together a festival like tour, titled the Bar-B-Q-Mitz-vah tour with the Butthole Surfers, Flaming Lips, Basehead, and Firehose.  The band had hoped to be part of the 1993 Lollapalooza tour, but weren’t asked.  In a September 1993 interview with Guitar School Dean DeLeo stated, “We didn’t even get asked! We were really let down, because we would have loved to do that gig. So now we’re on the ‘God-I’m-a-loosa’ tour. [laughs] I’m only kidding.”  Despite missing out on Lollapalooza, STP’s summer 1993 tour was one of the most explosive of the summer, and they established themselves as one of the premier live bands in rock.  The band even came out dressed as Kiss at the Roseland Ballroom in New York on August 3, 1993.  That night was also the first time Scott Weiland ever tried heroin, which led to tensions in the band that lasted for a decade.

Later in 1993 STP performed on MTV’s Unplugged.  The acoustic version of “Plush” was a hit, having already being performed earlier in 1993 on MTV.  Atlantic Records wanted the band to record an EP based around an acoustic version of Plush, but the band shot this down, telling the label they didn’t want to be known as the Plush band.  STP debuted “Big Empty” during their Unplugged performance, which ended up appearing on The Crow film soundtrack and Purple.  STP had originally planned on contributing a new version of their 1990 demo “Only Dying” to the soundtrack, but lead star Brandon Lee’s death on set made the band decide to use another song.  Steve Stewart recalls, “I don’t recall a new version of Only Dyin’ actually being recorded, but it might have been. Whatever the case, it is true that we decided to scrap it for The Crow in deference to Brandon Lee’s passing. We negotiated for Big Empty to be in all the trailers for The Crow, which got more attention on TV, than the song got at radio, and the coup was coordinating it to lead the off the record as the first single, while the song was so hot on TV, resulting in a #1 debut for Purple (very narrowly beating out a release by Warren G) in June of 1994. Much of this was pure circumstance, but there was quite a bit of jockeying going on behind the scenes.”  After the Unplugged performance and after the recording of Big Empty, the band headed into the studio to record their second album Purple, marking the end of the Core era.  As of 2012, Core has been certified 8x Platinum in the United States, making it one of the most popular albums of the 90’s alternative rock era.  The album was released 20 years ago today, but songs from Core are still played in heavy rotation today on rock radio.  STP fans continue to debate which of STP’s six albums is their best, but Core will always be remembered as what started it all. While it is enjoyable to look back at Core, let’s hope the ride isn’t over yet and that STP come roaring back with a seventh studio album next year.


Stone Temple Pilots on MTV Unplugged (November 1993)


Wicked Garden (1990 Demo)


Where The River Goes (1990 Demo)


Wicked Garden (September 1993 Live on David Letterman)


Naked Sunday (August 1993 Live at Reading Festival)


Plush (June 1993 Live at MTV Movie Awards)


Naked Sunday (1990 Demo)


Only Dying (1990 Demo)

AlternativeNation.net Interview With Steve Stewart, Former Stone Temple Pilots Manager

Stone Temple Pilots’ debut album Core was released 20 years ago today. We have a retrospective up on the band’s early days and Core, that features quotes from former Stone Temple Pilots manager Steve Stewart. This is the full interview I conducted with him. Stewart managed the band from their early pre-major label days up until August 2000. At the time of this interview I was under the impression that he managed the band up until their first breakup in 2003, so a couple of questions I asked about 2000’s era STP will go unanswered until STP finally decide to reveal what happened to the Shangri LA DEE DA documentary!

When and how did you meet the band?  Was the lineup Scott/Robert/Dean/Eric at that point, or was Corey Hickok still playing with Scott/Robert/Eric?  Do you know the timeline of events as to when Scott and Robert started playing, then Eric joined them, then eventually Dean?  Details surrounding all of this are very vague, so I was curious if you might know.

My band gigged with Soi Disant (1983-84?) which I believe featured Scott, Corey and the Tubbs brothers (Scott and Lonnie) – Robert and Eric came in somewhere between Soi Disant and Mighty Joe Young, I believe. I don’t remember the exact timeline. Dean was last.

Do you remember exactly when the Mighty Joe Young demos were recorded?  I’ve seen a picture a cassette featuring the band’s funkier songs like Love Machine, Dirty Dog, and the early Piece of Pie and then another demo with Wicked Garden, Where The River Goes, Naked Sunday, and Piece of Pie.  Then there is also the 11 track demo tape that features Only Dying and other songs like the ones I’ve mentioned as well, which is available online.  Do you remember when these were recorded?  I’ve heard talk of 1989-1990.

It was definitely before 1991. as I shopped that tape for the first record deal. It’s true, the band’s sound was much more “LA funk” than what came out on Core in 1992. Except for “Where The River Goes.” The demo version of that track (which is on the cassette) is one of my favorite STP songs. Thick and tasty – I think it sounds better than the album version on Core, but it’s pretty much unchanged. “Only Dyin'” was also going to be in “The Crow,” before Brandon Lee was killed.

Did you notice a progression of the band during their early years, from playing some funk songs to focusing more on hard rock stuff like Wicked Garden?  You can tell there are two different sides to the band on the early Mighty Joe Young demos, and they obviously went more in the hard rock direction on Core.

Yes – the best rock producer of that era, Brendan O’Brien, had a lot to do with that. Robert asked me to find him and inquire about producing Core. At that point, the LA scene was dominated by bands like the Chili Peppers and Fishbone, etc., while Seattle was starting to come into its own with a post-punk, stripped-down version of rock.

What venues did the band play in their early days?  Where were they?  Predominately in Los Angeles, Orange County, or San Diego?  Or a mix?

As Mighty Joe Young, pretty much every club in southern California. Raji’s, The Shamrock, the Golden Bear – all the Hollywood and OC venues. As STP, not so much, as the band changed names right before the first record came out and then was off to tour the states surrounding the record release in Sept. 1992. By the time they came back to LA, in early 1993, the album was already Platinum and it was time to look at larger venues. There was no indie album, there was no list of various players – it was like starting from scratch in many ways.

Do you remember when some of the Core hits like Plush and Sex Type Thing were written and first performed live?  I’ve read [in the 1995 STP mini book written by Mick Wall and Malcolm Dome] that you gave Danny Goldberg a demo tape featuring Plush, Sex Type Thing, and Dead and Bloated and that’s what got the band signed.  When was this demo tape recorded, and will it ever see the light of day?

That’s not true – the band was signed off the Mighty Joe Young cassette (mentioned above), when a very hard-working A&R guy at Atlantic named Tom Carolan came to see them after hearing from his best friend Don Muller, to whom I had given a demo tape and invited to a show. Don became their first booking agent and is one of the top music agents in town today. Tom’s immediate boss was Jason Flom, who also believed very much in the band. Danny was being brought in to run Atlantic on the west coast at that time and was also there for the signing. I believe Plush, Sex Type Thing and Dead and Bloated were all completed after the signing, although parts may have existed before. They were never on any Mighty Joe Young demo – although some parts of those demo songs did make it onto the first record in different songs.

Is there any video footage of the band from the Mighty Joe Young days?  There was a brief clip of an early club show on STP’s 1996 Rockumentary.  Why is there so little documentation of the band’s early days?

You’re probably not old enough to remember the days when not everyone walked around with a 20 megapixel 1080p video camera in their pocket! This was before email – well at least the mass-consumer version you’re accustomed to today. The only cameras that were affordable to the common person were either 8 or 16mm film or bulky, multi-piece video decks that weighed 30 lbs. and cost $1200! No Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube – you actually had to call your friends on a wired telephone (remember those?!)

There has been talk that STP recorded a studio version of ‘Only Dying’ for The Crow soundtrack, but that they decided to scrap that and go with Big Empty after star Brandon Lee died on set.  Is there really an unreleased studio recording of Only Dying out there somewhere?

That’s mostly true. I don’t recall a new version of Only Dyin’ actually being recorded, but it might have been. Whatever the case, it is true that we decided to scrap it for The Crow in deference to Brandon Lee’s passing. We negotiated for Big Empty to be in all the trailers for The Crow, which got more attention on TV, than the song got at radio, and the coup was coordinating it to lead the off the record as the first single, while the song was so hot on TV, resulting in a #1 debut for Purple (very narrowly beating out a release by Warren G) in June of 1994. Much of this was pure circumstance, but there was quite a bit of jockeying going on behind the scenes.

Did it get frustrating when the band had to postpone and cancel tours in the mid to late 90’s?  How much money do you imagine was lost in 1996 because of this.  Is it true that the band made Scott pay them for any money lost on canceled dates?

It was very frustrating. It’s hard to figure what lost opportunity costs, but human beings can only do so much. The band worked as much as it could. It’s easy to play Monday morning quarterback, but when you’re immersed in the trenches, it’s a much different view. I do recall Scott having to make good on some canceled shows.

Is it true that the band were offered 1 million dollars to record a song for the Godzilla soundtrack in 1998 while they were on hiatus?

I don’t recall the figure, but that’s within the realm of song licensing circa 1998!

STP had a documentary filmed by Chapman Bahler while they were recording Shangri LA DEE DA.  Why wasn’t this documentary released, was it ever completed?  Will it ever be released?

I have no idea – I wasn’t managing them by that point.

How did you get along with the band?  Were there guys you liked to deal with, and others you found more difficult over the years?

I think we did pretty well at times, and not so well at others. They are all very talented and creative individuals (each one with a different personality), and I was the “business” guy. I didn’t party. I didn’t socialize with them at that level and I think that was always somewhat of a barrier. But it was also a necessary point of delineation from my perspective, as there are many examples of managers and “assistants” getting caught up in the mix and losing the ability to relate to the artist on a business level. At times, I would relate it to a marriage – you love the person, and you know them and they know you, but outside circumstances can wreak havoc. It’s unbelievable how many ways you can be pulled on a daily basis when things are on fire. There are many sources of pressure, with different agendas and most of them at odds with each other. 300 phone calls a day. A good part of my job was to shield the band from this tornado and give them the space to do what they do best – write and perform.

Why haven’t you been managing the band since they reunited in 2008?  I remember hearing some talk that you were co-managing the band when they reunited.  If so is it true that Coachella initially offered them a bunch of money to reunite?  Are you still in touch with any of the members of the band?

We parted ways in August of 2000. At that time, they were on tour with the Chili Peppers and the Chili Peppers’ managers (who are highly respected music managers) started managing them at that point. I think that lasted about a year. Then they went to The Firm (also a highly respected management company), and that went for a few years. I’m not sure what they were searching for, but I don’t think they found it during those years as far as management went. I was asked by the band to help put together the greatest hits album Thank You in 2003, while Scott was incarcerated (which made things slightly difficult!), and then asked to help put together a tour a couple of years later. That never materialized, and I believe the band had separate managers at that point. I don’t have any knowledge about Coachella. I haven’t spoken to the band in years, but I do hope they are happy, healthy and enjoying all the best life has to offer.They were very fortunate to have caught the last bit of the glory days of the major label artist. I don’t think there will be anything like those days again, and so many talented, young artists today will never achieve the notoriety and fortune that the music industry made possible over the last 50 years.

Former Stone Temple Pilots manager Steve Stewart 

MATT CAMERON TALKS THE POSSIBILITY OF A PEARL JAM & SOUNDGARDEN TOUR

WAAF interviewed Soundgarden/Pearl Jam drummer Matt Cameron yesterday and when asked about the possibility of a Pearl Jam/Soundgarden/Temple of the Dog tour, he had this to say:

“After I play like, I don’t know, 2 hours with Soundgarden, my day is done. I think when we did the PJ20 show Chris came out to that and we played some Temple of the Dog stuff and it was awesome. Maybe there might be a one off where that could happen, but I’m not 25 anymore.”

There was recently an article online about how this guy wanted a Pearl Jam/Soundgarden tour to happen, and it was misconstrued by radio DJ’s and other news sites as rumors.

PEARL JAM TO FINISH NEW ALBUM EARLY NEXT YEAR

Thanks to Ben Chapman for letting me know about this.

The new issue of Rolling Stone has a blurb about Pearl Jam’s next album with some quotes from Jeff Ament. The band plan to finish the new album in early 2013, Ament had this to say about the sound of the album compared to Backspacer, “Hopefully the next thing is something more out there. I think we’re about due for some songs that are way outside of where our comfort level is.”

CHRIS CORNELL DISCUSSES WRITING NEW SOUNDGARDEN SONG ‘BEEN AWAY TOO LONG’

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell talked about Soundgarden’s new album King Animal and its lead single “Been Away Too Long” in a new interview with Live 105.  Here are two quotes from the interview from Chris.

“This new album King Animal, it has a lot of layers to it. It’s something that it will take time for people to kind of digest and it’s not something that I could describe to you right now or that you will understand based on listening to the first single for example. When Live to Rise came out, I did some interviews where a lot of people were asking ‘is this kind of indicative of the feel of the new album?’ And the answer was, no it’s not really. If you take any song from the new album, and take it out of context of the new album, that’s not either. There’s a lot going on, but it’s definitely [indicative] on some level of where we are now.”

“When we started talking about making a new album, this was almost two years ago, I was sitting around and one night having trouble sleeping. I was thinking of new Soundgarden songs and the music in my head was some sort of uptempo kind of Soundgarden version of a punk rock song, but not Been Away Too Long. And that line sort of flashed across as I was just kind of listening to what I call brain radio, and I thought wow that would be a great new Soundgarden song. Then I forgot it, completely. The music was something else that I had written and demoed in a fairly compact form without a bridge really it was like verse chorus solo with no lyrics no vocals nothing and played it for the band and they really liked it. We worked on it as a band arranging it, Ben came up with kind of a jammy bridge section that was really cool and we recorded it like that and it was done but I had still never wrote anything. Towards the end when we were almost to mixing and we were finished with the album I was having trouble sleeping one night and I remembered that line and thought, this would be really great for like a first Soundgarden single. But as I started to write the lyrics then it became more autobiographical and it became real. I don’t think I would write lyrics to a Soundgarden album that would be like Eminem writing lyrics to a new Eminem song, which is essentially telling the story of the making of the album and where he feels he exists in pop culture and that kind of thing. So it’s not really that, it’s more autobiographical and more of a look back at history in sort of a strange atmospheric way, the way that I write. But the initial spark of the idea did feel like it would be right in the narrative of, yes we’ve been out and we’ve been gone for 15 years and now we’re back. It’s about time, and we still have something to say about rock music that no one else is saying and I feel confident about saying that.”

MATT CAMERON TALKS NEW SOUNDGARDEN SONGS ‘BY CROOKED STEPS’ AND ‘BLACK SATURDAY’

WAAF interviewed Soundgarden drummer Matt Cameron yesterday and he had this to say about his work on Soundgarden’s new album King Animal, “I wrote two songs on the new record, and one was a collaboration called Crooked Steps that is one of my favorites. It has all the elements that I guess we’re known for it’s not in 4-4 and it’s got a really awesome vocal part. The drumming is kind of all over the place, there’s a lot of percussion. There’s a song called Black Saturday that I’m really proud of. I really feel good about the album as a whole, I think it will be a nice addition to our catalog and our legacy.”

Cameron also talked about the benefits of the internet for music when it comes to gauging fan reactions, but he added that he can’t delve too deep into it, ““It can get a little weird, with all the trolls out there.” Stay away from the comments section here Matt!